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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
"Paradise," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 159 pages. $24. If ever an opening paragraph were guaranteed to snag readers prone to wanderlust, it would seem to be this one from Larry McMurtry: "I am in Punaauia, Tahiti, in a thatched bungalow with a twenty-foot ceiling. My bungalow sits at the end of a clattery wooden walkway, built over Punaauia's perfect blue lagoon. The South Pacific, here in its gentlest mode, laps a few feet below my bed. In effect I sleep on the most soothing of water beds, one whose blue waters slap and sigh, untrapped."
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Baltimore Ravens strong safety James Ihedigbo harbors no fears, especially when it comes to going face to face with his opponents. Ihedigbo's teammates get a kick out of his focus and intensity. Ihedigbo was so deeply immersed "in the zone" after forcing a near-interception (it was later called back) against the Miami Dolphins, he completely missed coach John Harbaugh's congratulatory chest bump - cameras caught him trotting past his leaping coach. But Ihedigbo clearly likes to celebrate.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
There's still time to take off for Tahiti, and it's hardly any trouble at all. Tickets are still available for the Baltimore Opera Guild's annual fund-raiser Saturday night.This year it's called "Trouble in Tahiti" and takes place at a private residence in Baltimore County. The event, whose theme is taken from an opera by Leonard Bernstein, benefits the Baltimore Opera Company.There will be dining, dancing and casino-style games of chance, as well as a silent auction of vintage wines and a dinner party for 50 from Truffles . . . the Catering Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
The Way to Paradise, by Mario Vargas Llosa. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 384 pages. $25. Mario Vargas Llosa's historical novel, The Way to Paradise, takes its title from a children's game, much like hide and seek, in which one child asks the other players, "Is this the way to Paradise?" The response is always "try the next corner;" but as the child runs to the next corner, the others reconfigure themselves so that "paradise" can never be found. In this fluid melding of Vargas Llosa's usual biting socio-political commentary with actual history, he metaphorizes the concept of an elusive Paradise through the novel's main characters, French social reformer and feminist Flora Tristan and her grandson, painter Paul Gauguin.
FEATURES
By Eric Malnic and Eric Malnic,Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1995
Actor Marlon Brando's daughter Cheyenne -- the troubled, onetime model whose half-brother killed her lover in the movie star's sprawling Hollywood Hills home -- has committed suicide in Tahiti, officials said yesterday.Cheyenne Brando, who had been in seclusion for months, hanged herself at her home on the South Pacific island, authorities said. Friends said she had suffered from depression since Christian Brando fatally shot Dag Drollet in a 1990 case that made news around the world. The 25-year-old actor's daughter reportedly had attempted suicide at least twice.
FEATURES
By Susan Kaye Laura Barnhardt of The Sun staff contributed to this story | October 16, 1994
Tahiti is seven hours' flying time southwest of Los Angeles, across the equator and then some. Add in nearly six hours for the transcontinental hop from Baltimore and that's a long way to travel for a beach vacation.Even so, visits to French Polynesia's islands by Maryland residents were up 54 percent in 1993 from the year before, with a total of 602 Marylanders visiting last year."One Tahiti booking was from a woman whose requirements were to go far away and get away from it all," said Donna Davis, assistant manager at Cruises Only Inc., a Baltimore travel agency.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Polynesia, still idyllic By Sunny and Walter Rudolph SPECIAL TO THE SUN My husband is an 84-year-old retired graphic artist, and he drew this Tahiti scene (right) for our personalized Christmas card. We have prepared our own cards for 48 years using scenes from trips along with religious and family themes. One of our most memorable vacations was our two-week cruise to French Polynesia. We visited four ports in the Hawaiian Islands, then made our way south to Christmas Island, Bora Bora, Moorea and Papeete, Tahiti.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
The Way to Paradise, by Mario Vargas Llosa. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 384 pages. $25. Mario Vargas Llosa's historical novel, The Way to Paradise, takes its title from a children's game, much like hide and seek, in which one child asks the other players, "Is this the way to Paradise?" The response is always "try the next corner;" but as the child runs to the next corner, the others reconfigure themselves so that "paradise" can never be found. In this fluid melding of Vargas Llosa's usual biting socio-political commentary with actual history, he metaphorizes the concept of an elusive Paradise through the novel's main characters, French social reformer and feminist Flora Tristan and her grandson, painter Paul Gauguin.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Baltimore Ravens strong safety James Ihedigbo harbors no fears, especially when it comes to going face to face with his opponents. Ihedigbo's teammates get a kick out of his focus and intensity. Ihedigbo was so deeply immersed "in the zone" after forcing a near-interception (it was later called back) against the Miami Dolphins, he completely missed coach John Harbaugh's congratulatory chest bump - cameras caught him trotting past his leaping coach. But Ihedigbo clearly likes to celebrate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Lewis | October 26, 2003
The Bounty: The True Story of the Mutiny on the Bounty, by Caroline Alexander. Viking Press. 416 pages. $27.95. The rehabilitation of William Bligh is one of those quixotic projects that pit history against mythology, with predictable results. Remembered as a villain, the Bounty's captain was something closer to a hero: a humane commander who spared the lash, a brilliant navigator who guided an open boat full of castaways halfway across the Pacific to safety. He entered that boat at the point of a bayonet wielded by his erstwhile protege Fletcher Christian, who betrayed him and set him adrift in mid-ocean to face what looked like certain death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
"Paradise," by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 159 pages. $24. If ever an opening paragraph were guaranteed to snag readers prone to wanderlust, it would seem to be this one from Larry McMurtry: "I am in Punaauia, Tahiti, in a thatched bungalow with a twenty-foot ceiling. My bungalow sits at the end of a clattery wooden walkway, built over Punaauia's perfect blue lagoon. The South Pacific, here in its gentlest mode, laps a few feet below my bed. In effect I sleep on the most soothing of water beds, one whose blue waters slap and sigh, untrapped."
TRAVEL
April 15, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Polynesia, still idyllic By Sunny and Walter Rudolph SPECIAL TO THE SUN My husband is an 84-year-old retired graphic artist, and he drew this Tahiti scene (right) for our personalized Christmas card. We have prepared our own cards for 48 years using scenes from trips along with religious and family themes. One of our most memorable vacations was our two-week cruise to French Polynesia. We visited four ports in the Hawaiian Islands, then made our way south to Christmas Island, Bora Bora, Moorea and Papeete, Tahiti.
FEATURES
By Eric Malnic and Eric Malnic,Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1995
Actor Marlon Brando's daughter Cheyenne -- the troubled, onetime model whose half-brother killed her lover in the movie star's sprawling Hollywood Hills home -- has committed suicide in Tahiti, officials said yesterday.Cheyenne Brando, who had been in seclusion for months, hanged herself at her home on the South Pacific island, authorities said. Friends said she had suffered from depression since Christian Brando fatally shot Dag Drollet in a 1990 case that made news around the world. The 25-year-old actor's daughter reportedly had attempted suicide at least twice.
FEATURES
By Susan Kaye Laura Barnhardt of The Sun staff contributed to this story | October 16, 1994
Tahiti is seven hours' flying time southwest of Los Angeles, across the equator and then some. Add in nearly six hours for the transcontinental hop from Baltimore and that's a long way to travel for a beach vacation.Even so, visits to French Polynesia's islands by Maryland residents were up 54 percent in 1993 from the year before, with a total of 602 Marylanders visiting last year."One Tahiti booking was from a woman whose requirements were to go far away and get away from it all," said Donna Davis, assistant manager at Cruises Only Inc., a Baltimore travel agency.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
There's still time to take off for Tahiti, and it's hardly any trouble at all. Tickets are still available for the Baltimore Opera Guild's annual fund-raiser Saturday night.This year it's called "Trouble in Tahiti" and takes place at a private residence in Baltimore County. The event, whose theme is taken from an opera by Leonard Bernstein, benefits the Baltimore Opera Company.There will be dining, dancing and casino-style games of chance, as well as a silent auction of vintage wines and a dinner party for 50 from Truffles . . . the Catering Company.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | July 7, 1991
TUCUME, Peru -- A giant sting ray haunts the sacred mountain, and witch doctors high on hallucinogens reign.Spirits move as shadows in the night. A curse is cast; a deadrooster is hung from a pole, and a dog is slaughtered.Buzzards circle overhead. The heat is punishing. The place is called El Purgatorio, and it's just outside this impoverished village of dirt streets and adobe shacks.Thor Heyerdahl has come to unlock its secrets. Tanned, fit, white hair neatly combed and blue eyes clear and direct, the Norwegian explorer, 76,, who was made famous by his Kon-Tiki voyage 44 years ago, has calmed the spirits and befriended the witch doctors in an effort to excavate the largest complex of pyramids in the Americas.
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