Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTagatose
IN THE NEWS

Tagatose

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
No firm on Wall Street has an analyst who follows it. Only one firm anyone outside Wall Street junkies ever heard of even trades it. Legg Mason and T. Rowe Price, two of Baltimore's leading securities firms, say they don't own it.So how has Biospherics Inc. of Beltsville seen its roughly 4 million shares gain $75 million of value in the past week, propelling the tiny biotechnology company that made 5 cents a share in the first half of this year to a...
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | March 27, 2008
In the hunt for better treatments for the growing and related epidemics of diabetes and obesity, researchers may have uncovered an unlikely drug: sugar. Tagatose is a natural, low-calorie sugar that has been used to sweeten such things as orange juice and candy in Europe. And, for a short time, it was used in Diet Pepsi Slurpees at 7-Eleven in the United States. But now tagatose is in a yearlong clinical trial to show that it's not just a palate pleaser but a manager for the most common form of diabetes, Type 2. If the trial goes well, it could be a big step in tagatose becoming a medicine, and eventually, an uber-sweet diet aid, according to an article in February's Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
Biospherics Inc. said yesterday that it had completed a licensing deal with a Danish food company for the rights to manufacture and market its D-Tagatose sugar substitute worldwide.Shares of the Beltsville company's stock closed up 87.5 cents at $8 on the news.Under the agreement, which has been in the works for a year, MD Foods Ingredients of Denmark will pay Biospherics an upfront signing payment and another payment before Jan. 7, once legal matters in the agreement are wrapped up, the companies said.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
At a Glen Burnie 7-Eleven, Michael Kropkowski pulled the Diet Pepsi lever of the store's Slurpee-maker and watched as the cola-colored, icy slush climbed the sides of his tall, clear cup and filled the dome-shaped lid. A long straw topped off his creation. It might not be a cure for cancer, but it represented a sweet moment for a small Beltsville biotechnology firm that has spent years developing Tagatose, the low-calorie sugar substitute it contains. After years of struggles, Spherix Inc. is getting its first big shot at market acceptance.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this story | September 5, 1997
Shares in Biospherics Inc. dropped 38 percent yesterday, after gum giant Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. disputed that it is seeking a patent to use a sweetener the Beltsville company developed.More than 2.5 million shares traded hands as the stock dropped $4.593 to close at $7.531.Biospherics President and Chief Executive Officer Gilbert V. Levin reacted angrily to Wrigley's denial of the patent filing, which his company announced in a press release Wednesday. Biospherics share price tripled after the release.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | March 27, 2008
In the hunt for better treatments for the growing and related epidemics of diabetes and obesity, researchers may have uncovered an unlikely drug: sugar. Tagatose is a natural, low-calorie sugar that has been used to sweeten such things as orange juice and candy in Europe. And, for a short time, it was used in Diet Pepsi Slurpees at 7-Eleven in the United States. But now tagatose is in a yearlong clinical trial to show that it's not just a palate pleaser but a manager for the most common form of diabetes, Type 2. If the trial goes well, it could be a big step in tagatose becoming a medicine, and eventually, an uber-sweet diet aid, according to an article in February's Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
Biospherics Inc., a Beltsville-based company that has developed a sugar substitute called D-Tagatose, yesterday filed a $15 million libel lawsuit against Forbes magazine and a reporter.A spokesman in the legal department of Forbes declined comment yesterday.Biospherics contends in the lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, that its stock price declined and that the company had subsequent difficulty raising capital as a result of a column that appeared under the heading Money & Investments in the Jan. 13 issue of the widely read publication.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Shares of Spherix Inc. gained as much as 12 percent yesterday after the company said Kellogg Co. had been issued a patent enabling it to include Spherix's low-calorie sugar substitute in foods such as ready-to-eat cereal. The nation's No. 1 cereal maker wouldn't say yesterday whether it had specific plans to add tagatose to its products, nor would Kellogg say whether it had ordered significant amounts of the sweetener. And Spherix Chief Executive Officer Gilbert V. Levin cautioned that the patent doesn't guarantee that Kellogg will be adding tagatose to anything.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
Biospherics Inc., a Beltsville-based biotechnology company, said yesterday that its patented low-calorie sweetener received approval from an independent panel of qualified experts, a finding that effectively clears the way for its sale in the United States. Biospherics stands to reap royalties from a roughly $2 billion world market for tagatose, a sweetener that "tastes, looks, feels and performs like table sugar," according to a company statement. "The approval was tremendously important," said Dr. Gilbert V. Levin, Biospherics' chief executive officer and chairman.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 17, 1992
A Beltsville company that is trying to develop a sugar substitute that can be easily used in baking took a step toward getting the product on the market yesterday by winning a key patent, but the company's chief executive said the product is still years from the market.Biospherics Inc. said it had won a patent for calcium tagatate, a compound it uses in a previously patented process for making D-Tagatose, an artificial sugar derived from whey, a dairy byproduct.The company's chief executive, Gilbert Levin, said the new patent helped intensify the company's talks with potential investors, which are major food companies that would add the sugar substitute to their products.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Shares of Spherix Inc. gained as much as 12 percent yesterday after the company said Kellogg Co. had been issued a patent enabling it to include Spherix's low-calorie sugar substitute in foods such as ready-to-eat cereal. The nation's No. 1 cereal maker wouldn't say yesterday whether it had specific plans to add tagatose to its products, nor would Kellogg say whether it had ordered significant amounts of the sweetener. And Spherix Chief Executive Officer Gilbert V. Levin cautioned that the patent doesn't guarantee that Kellogg will be adding tagatose to anything.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
Spherix Inc. initiated arbitration proceedings yesterday to seek monetary damages from the licensee of its new low-calorie sweetener, claiming the Danish company was taking too long to bring it to market. Arla Foods amba, Europe's largest dairy producer, holds the world rights to produce Tagatose, Spherix's sugar substitute. The Food and Drug Adminstration approved Tagatose for use in food last year. But the Beltsville company claims that Arla is moving too slowly in bringing the sweetener to the world market, where an estimated 130 million tons of sugar will be consumed this year.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Spherix Inc. traces its origins to outer space and its future fortunes, in part, to manure. So it isn't surprising that company President David Affeldt has learned to brace himself for wisecracks. "Are you guys as far up in orbit as Mars?" one smart aleck recently asked him as the two talked business. It doesn't help that its product offerings, while down to earth, can seem a wacky combination. At one end of Spherix's Beltsville headquarters, headset-wearing employees staff a call center, handling everything from questions about drugs for pharmaceutical companies to a state child-support hot line.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
Biospherics Inc., a Beltsville-based biotechnology company, said yesterday that its patented low-calorie sweetener received approval from an independent panel of qualified experts, a finding that effectively clears the way for its sale in the United States. Biospherics stands to reap royalties from a roughly $2 billion world market for tagatose, a sweetener that "tastes, looks, feels and performs like table sugar," according to a company statement. "The approval was tremendously important," said Dr. Gilbert V. Levin, Biospherics' chief executive officer and chairman.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
Biospherics Inc. said yesterday that it could be getting closer to finally making money from production of a sugar substitute it developed a decade ago.The Beltsville company sold licensing rights to the substitute, called D-tagatose, three years ago to MD Foods Ingredients, a Danish dairy producer. MD Foods will produce tagatose, sell it to food manufacturers and pay royalties on the sales to Biospherics.In what Biospherics executives hope is a sign that MD Foods is getting ready to go into high gear on production of tagatose, the Danish company said it is planning to merge with the Swedish dairy-and-food products company Arla.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this story | September 5, 1997
Shares in Biospherics Inc. dropped 38 percent yesterday, after gum giant Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. disputed that it is seeking a patent to use a sweetener the Beltsville company developed.More than 2.5 million shares traded hands as the stock dropped $4.593 to close at $7.531.Biospherics President and Chief Executive Officer Gilbert V. Levin reacted angrily to Wrigley's denial of the patent filing, which his company announced in a press release Wednesday. Biospherics share price tripled after the release.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 18, 1994
Biospherics Inc.'s shares rose 11 percent yesterday after the company said late Monday it will sell its nonfattening sugar, D-tagatose, through distributors in Asia, southeast Asia and the southern Pacific region.The Beltsville company's stock closed trading up 75 cents, at $7.50, on Nasdaq volume of 22,900 shares, compared with the six-month average daily volume of 3,900 shares.The company said it will use initial profits from overseas sales of D-tagatose to pay for tests required for approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
Biospherics Inc., a Beltsville-based company that has developed a sugar substitute called D-Tagatose, yesterday filed a $15 million libel lawsuit against Forbes magazine and a reporter.A spokesman in the legal department of Forbes declined comment yesterday.Biospherics contends in the lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, that its stock price declined and that the company had subsequent difficulty raising capital as a result of a column that appeared under the heading Money & Investments in the Jan. 13 issue of the widely read publication.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
Biospherics Inc. said yesterday that it had completed a licensing deal with a Danish food company for the rights to manufacture and market its D-Tagatose sugar substitute worldwide.Shares of the Beltsville company's stock closed up 87.5 cents at $8 on the news.Under the agreement, which has been in the works for a year, MD Foods Ingredients of Denmark will pay Biospherics an upfront signing payment and another payment before Jan. 7, once legal matters in the agreement are wrapped up, the companies said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.