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By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1998
SANTA CLAUS IS coming to town. Actually, he rode through town last week atop one of Mount Airy's fire engines instead of on a sleigh, thanks to the efforts of Mount Airy Fire Prevention Committee.Keeping up with its annual tradition, Mount Airy Volunteer Fire Company drove Santa through the town and surrounding neighborhoods the week of Dec. 14, ending Sunday.Lt. Jerry Abel of Mount Airy fire company drove the fire engine Sunday. "It's a lot of fun to do this for the kids," he said. "They have a great time seeing Santa, and they get candy canes.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 4, 1991
Alexei Sultanov was mugged on the way to becoming famous. The then-19-year-old Soviet pianist wasn't actually assaulted, of course -- with his Popeye-sized forearms and third-degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do, the diminutive Sultanov would unpleasantly surprise any criminal. But two years ago he was a favorite whipping boy of many American critics after he won first prize in Fort Worth, Texas' Van Cliburn Competition."Critics generally like boring pianists," says Sultanov, who will give a recital tonight at the University of Maryland in College Park.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Some jog, some swim and some pump iron.But when Speaker of the House Thomas S. Foley wants to exercise, he puts on a white cotton uniform called a dobok, heads to the Rayburn building members' gym and breaks wooden boards.With his hands.And his elbows."In today's political world, using your head sometimes isn't enough," the speaker says. "You also have to learn to use your elbows."Don't believe it? Then just come out tomorrow night to the Grand Ballroom of the Omni Shoreham Hotel.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2001
ON THEIR way toward a dream of representing the United States in the Olympics, 10 dedicated students from South Carroll's Tae Kwon Do Academy recently competed in a national competition. The students, ages 7 to 15, attended the U.S. Tae Kwon Do Junior Olympic Championships in Tampa, Fla., their first such competition. They qualified for the event in the Maryland State Tae Kwon Do Competition in April. Master Bun Huor, coach and owner of the academy at Carrolltown Center in Eldersburg, took 21 students to the Maryland competition.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 1, 2000
Kids, teens and adults were kicking, punching and breaking boards Saturday at Howard High School as spectators cheered them on. But it wasn't a schoolyard free-for-all. Instead, competitors had gathered in the gym to show off their martial arts skills and to vie for trophies in three events at the ninth U.S. Masters' Cup Tae Kwon Do Championships. The tournament attracted male and female competitors of all ages and skill levels from the Maryland and Washington areas. This was the first year in which tae kwon do was counted as an Olympic sport.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2003
Ponytailed Youngshin Jennifer Chang packs a back kick that would make Charlie's Angels slink away in shame. It's a kick that helped Chang snag the gold in the 2003 Junior Pan American Tae Kwon Do Games last month - a sweet ending to the Edgewood High School senior's junior competition career. It's her signature kick - a spin and backward kick to a challenger's face - that might land her a spot on the 2008 United States Olympic tae kwon do team. Chang, 17, is being scouted to train on the national team that feeds into the Olympics.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2003
Ponytailed Youngshin Jennifer Chang packs a back kick that would make Charlie's Angels slink away in shame. It's a kick that helped Chang snag the gold in the 2003 Junior Pan American Tae Kwon Do Games last month -- a sweet ending to the Edgewood High School senior's junior competition career. It's her signature kick -- a spin and backward kick to a challenger's face -- that might land her a spot on the 2008 United States Olympic tae kwon do team. Chang, 17, is being scouted to train on the national team that feeds into the Olympics.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Warner Lai is a rangy eighth-grader who rips through cinder blocks with his bare hand in gym class. He's almost a black belt. Today, he and three other eighth-graders at Midtown Academy, where two mandatory tae kwon do classes each week fulfill the state's physical education requirement, will take tests needed to graduate from danbo, or black belt-in-training, to full-fledged black belt. "I'm calm, I'm ready for this," Warner, 14, said this week, after his last class before the trials.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
They line up in rows of five as neatly as kindergartners are capable of lining up - 20 of them, dressed in whites and proudly displaying newly acquired white belts. They bow to the American flag and then to their "master" and begin a half-hour of tae kwon do, a Korean martial art that fulfills the state physical education requirement at Midtown Academy in Bolton Hill. Twice a week, every child in Midtown's kindergarten through seventh grade squares off in the basement multipurpose room for 30 minutes of punching, kicking, dancing, stretching, aerobics and meditation, sometimes to the recorded accompaniment of monks' chants or New Age music.
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