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Tadeusz Mazowiecki

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NEWS
October 29, 1991
The most devastating result in Poland's first free parliamentary election in 44 years was the massive indifference of the public. Only 40 percent of eligible Poles bothered to vote. So much for the freedom to choose, the freedom for which so many Poles suffered and died under totalitarian dictatorship.What the 40 percent wanted, or what the other 60 percent scorned, is unclear. Solidarity was weakened, shattered into fragments so that each of its off-shoot parties got less than one-tenth of the vote.
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NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | August 18, 1995
In August 1992, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, Poland's first non-communist prime minister after the Cold War, was appointed the U.N.'s special rapporteur on human rights violations in former Yugoslavia.Two weeks ago, after the fall of the ''safe havens'' of Srebrenica and Zepa, Mr. Mazowiecki resigned to protest U.N. ''hypocrisy'' in ''claiming to defend [Bosnia] but in fact abandoning it.''The Geneva-based U.N. Human Rights Subcommission expressed support for Mr. Mazowiecki's ''moral and courageous stand and his resignation in protest of the perpetuation of gross violations in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
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NEWS
By William Pfaff | December 9, 1990
Paris.--THE POLLS still say that Lech Walesa will win Poland's run-off presidential election today, but it is no sure thing. Given the frightening turn Poland's affairs have taken, it is essential that he do so. It also proves to have been essential that he and not Tadeusz Mazowiecki won the first round November 25.One's deepest sympathy was with Mr. Mazowiecki, a self-effacing intellectual attempting to carry out a rational reconstruction of Poland's ruined...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 2, 1992
OSWIECIM, Poland -- Beyond the Death Wall and the prisoners' barracks, past the ruined gas chambers and crematoriums, at the edge of the Auschwitz death camp, is a row of 19 concrete memorials.The memorials are dedicated to the victims of the Nazi killing machine that operated here with such horrific efficiency. But gone now from the memorials are the 19 inscriptions that said in 19 languages that 4 million people died here.The memorials are blank because they were wrong.Jewish and Polish scholars of the Holocaust now agree that the Auschwitz death toll was less than half the 4 million cited here for four decades.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | August 18, 1995
In August 1992, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, Poland's first non-communist prime minister after the Cold War, was appointed the U.N.'s special rapporteur on human rights violations in former Yugoslavia.Two weeks ago, after the fall of the ''safe havens'' of Srebrenica and Zepa, Mr. Mazowiecki resigned to protest U.N. ''hypocrisy'' in ''claiming to defend [Bosnia] but in fact abandoning it.''The Geneva-based U.N. Human Rights Subcommission expressed support for Mr. Mazowiecki's ''moral and courageous stand and his resignation in protest of the perpetuation of gross violations in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 2, 1992
OSWIECIM, Poland -- Beyond the Death Wall and the prisoners' barracks, past the ruined gas chambers and crematoriums, at the edge of the Auschwitz death camp, is a row of 19 concrete memorials.The memorials are dedicated to the victims of the Nazi killing machine that operated here with such horrific efficiency. But gone now from the memorials are the 19 inscriptions that said in 19 languages that 4 million people died here.The memorials are blank because they were wrong.Jewish and Polish scholars of the Holocaust now agree that the Auschwitz death toll was less than half the 4 million cited here for four decades.
NEWS
December 6, 1990
IT'S A BAD thing that reason, political realism and patience in Poland should have lost out against populism, impatience and ++ the idea that a society can change from one day to the next.The Poles will find out that the leader of their choice will disappoint their faith in charisma and intution. Poland's democracy is still a tiny seedling that has to be nurtured the way Prince Minister [Tadeusz] Mazowiecki did. It is not served by a dictatorial and unpredictable leader.Lech Walesa -- currently still very popular -- will soon encounter harsh, everyday reality.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
Over the past few days there has been a marked increase in cease-fire violations in SARAJEVO and elsewhere. The United Nations reopened the city's airport, which was closed last week after U.N. planes were hit by ground fire, but relief flights remained suspended. French and Ukrainian anti-sniping patrols were to deploy around the airport.Despite the threat of NATO air strikes, Bosnian Serbs fired an anti-aircraft gun on field hands near GORAZDE, killing a woman and wounding a man, U.N. officials said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- President Lech Walesa nominated yesterday Jan Krzysztof Bielecki, a little-known 39-year-old economist with a background in private business, for the post of prime minister.The selection underscored Mr. Walesa's commitment to Poland's ambitious program for fostering a free-market economy.Mr. Bielecki, a member of Parliament who once worked in the Solidarity underground, is said by associates to support the fastest possible privatization of the country's businesses and industries.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Germany and Poland formally ratified yesterday a treaty recognizing their existing border as valid and permanent.They thus ended a controversy that has erupted periodically since World War II and to which Germany's recent reunification added urgency.At a ceremony at Warsaw's Palace of the Council of Ministers, Foreign Ministers Hans-Dietrich Genscher and Krzysztof Skubiszewski signed and exchanged copies of the treaty.Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, who won final agreement to the treaty from German Chancellor Helmut Kohl last week, watched the ceremony.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
The most devastating result in Poland's first free parliamentary election in 44 years was the massive indifference of the public. Only 40 percent of eligible Poles bothered to vote. So much for the freedom to choose, the freedom for which so many Poles suffered and died under totalitarian dictatorship.What the 40 percent wanted, or what the other 60 percent scorned, is unclear. Solidarity was weakened, shattered into fragments so that each of its off-shoot parties got less than one-tenth of the vote.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | December 9, 1990
Paris.--THE POLLS still say that Lech Walesa will win Poland's run-off presidential election today, but it is no sure thing. Given the frightening turn Poland's affairs have taken, it is essential that he do so. It also proves to have been essential that he and not Tadeusz Mazowiecki won the first round November 25.One's deepest sympathy was with Mr. Mazowiecki, a self-effacing intellectual attempting to carry out a rational reconstruction of Poland's ruined...
NEWS
November 27, 1990
Poles may not have much practice in democracy but they know about negative campaigning. It was a dismal campaign on all sides that saw the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and charismatic Solidarity union founder, Lech Walesa, win a commanding lead going into the Dec. 9 run-off.The principal loser, Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, deserved better from Poles. He has thoughtfully tried to translate slogans into reforms. He is paying the price of resentments by people who lost their guaranteed place, however inadequate, in the Communist state.
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