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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2008
Pam Tabor vividly recalled a day in high school when she asked her Algebra II teacher, "Why is x to the zero power 1 and not zero?" to which the teacher responded, "That's just the way it is, Pam. Just accept it and go on." She decided that math was illogical, and therefore not something to be pursued. But then she had the opportunity to ask a college professor the same question, and he explained it to her with a simple proof. Math became sensible, and her life's passion. "From that point on, I decided that I would do everything within my power to help children make sense of mathematics," she said.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2001
Nearly 125 people were arrested during the weekend as Baltimore police swept through areas recently hit hard by drug-related violence. "Operation ZEBRA" - Zone Enforcement By Rapid Action - on Friday and Saturday included raids on more than a dozen dwellings and was conducted by the drug enforcement units and uniformed officers from each of the city's nine police districts. Lt. Michael Tabor said the initiative targeted areas where three homicides and 12 shootings, all unsolved, had occurred.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
An East Baltimore man was arrested this week just minutes after a female resident of the house where he lives signed for delivery of a golf bag that contained cocaine with an estimated value of $75,000, police said. Lt. Michael Tabor, head of the Central District drug enforcement unit, said police received a tip a few days ago from U.S. Customs agents in Miami that the golf bag was on its way from Jamaica to a house in the 1700 block of E. Lombard St. Tabor said the bag was delivered about 3 p.m. Monday by an undercover officer posing as a courier service employee, and the man was arrested.
NEWS
July 21, 1992
Two men -- including the longtime spokesman for the Maryland comptroller's office -- were injured last night when the roof of a garage they were shoring up in Linthicum Heights collapsed, trapping one of them, officials said.Marvin A. Bond, director of public affairs for the comptroller, was able to free himself from the debris after the roof of the garage behind his home in the 200 block of W. Greenwood Road fell in about 7:13 p.m., officials said.Mr. Bond's brother-in-law, Craig A. Tabor, 31, was trapped for 10 minutes before rescue crews freed him from the debris of the garage, said Anne Arundel Fire Capt.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 30, 1991
Lucille Melinda Tabor is lying motionless in a room at the Deaton Hospital and Medical Center in South Baltimore today. She grimaces at times and, during one recent visit, she looked for all the world like she was crying hard, but there was no sound except for a gurgle from her throat.A pat on the arm and she stopped her heaving motions, closed her mouth, opened her eyes and looked at the visitor.That was it. That is all she will do. She doesn't indicate whether she hears what visitors say or whether she recognizes staff or family.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Of the expected full field of 20 in the Kentucky Derby next Saturday at Churchill Downs, three of the horses will have traveled across the Atlantic - one from Dubai in the Middle East and two from Ireland. The one who has traveled the farthest will probably have the best chance. Essence of Dubai, a son of Pulpit purchased for $2.3 million as a yearling, has won both of his races this year at Nad Al Sheba Race Course in Dubai. Owned by Godolphin Racing, Essence of Dubai is the only Derby contender who has raced on dirt at 1 1/4 miles, the Derby distance.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
City officials and local pawnbrokers apparently have reached an agreement to toughen the law that regulates Baltimore's pawnshops by increasing penalties for unscrupulous owners and halting the spread of the businesses.The proposal would overhaul Baltimore's pawn law for the first time since 1921, said Sgt. Mike Tabor, who oversees the Police Department's pawn unit and is the driving force behind the change.A hearing on the bill yesterday illustrated the broad agreement among the industry, police and city officials.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
Benjamin H. West Sr., 94, Western Electric engineerBenjamin Herndon West Sr., a retired Western Electric Corp. efficiency engineer who entertained senior citizens with travelogues and slide shows, died in his sleep Sunday at Edenwald, a retirement community in Towson. He was 94.The former Stoneleigh resident had resided at Edenwald since 1987.He retired in 1970 from Western Electric Corp.'s Point Breeze plant, where he had been an efficiency engineer for 37 years.His travels with his wife to South America, Europe and Asia became the subjects of one-hour slide shows and travelogues that he took to area senior citizen centers and retirement communities.
NEWS
June 6, 1994
A 38-year-old Washington man was charged with first-degree murder yesterday in the stabbing death of a woman in her Glen Burnie apartment.Police said the victim, 34-year-old Mary Gadson, was found stabbed to death after a struggle in the apartment in the 7800 block of Tall Pines Court that she, at one time, had shared with the suspect, Thomas General Jr. of the 1600 block of N. Capital St.Detective Sgt. Rick Tabor, of the county police, said that the two...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
The riddle of the phone cord is like an Andy Rooney script.ANDY: "Did you ever wonder about those coiled telephone cords? Why do they get all kinked up the way they do?"They all come out of the box pretty well-behaved. But the next thing you know, they've got a kink -- a loop, somewhere in the middle, where the wire's neat coil makes an unruly U-turn. And you can go crazy trying to undo it."Why is that?"Well, it's a bigger question than Rooney might have imagined. And there's a growing band of mathematicians, microbiologists, astrophysicists and materials scientists who are chasing the answers.
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