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By GREGORY P. KANE | May 24, 1994
Hulond Humphries has been depicted as a horrible man, a veritable bete noire in the tradition of a Bull Connor or a Jim Clark, two of the notorious lawmen of the segregationist South who did more than their fair share to make life miserable for civil-rights demonstrators.Mr. Humphries is the principal of Randolph County High School in Wedowee, Alabama. Earlier this year he had the effrontery to make the politically incorrect decision to ban interracial couples from the high school prom. Judging from the reaction, you'd have thought he'd advocated drowning the baby Jesus.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 5, 2014
Comedian Joan Rivers once talked about how she came of age in the mid 1960s with Richard Pryor, Bill Cosby, Woody Allen and George Carlin in comedy clubs in Greenwich Village, where Johnny Carson's people would troll for new talent. She recalled that she was the last of the group to make it to "The Tonight Show," the last of the pack "allowed" to break through. "When I started out, a pretty girl did not go into comedy," she said. "I never was one of the guys, I was never asked to go hang out. "Looking back, I think it was because I was a woman, I was the very last one of the group they put on the Carson show.
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NEWS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Seth Ciferri has counseled many zealous teenagers against permanently marking their bodies with tattoos. "How will it affect your career?" asks the Baltimore tattoo parlor owner. Ciferri is especially cautious when fielding requests for large or highly visible pieces such as a dragon on the back of a hand or a boyfriend's name on a neck. "I try to reserve that kind of work for people who are in the tattoo business, are already covered or are independently wealthy and don't need a job," Ciferri said.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
To all the self-righteous folks who are outraged by the Penn State sexual abuse scandal and pontificate about what they would have done in the same situation: It's hard to confront an abuser and it is harder still to report one. Jerry Sandusky was confronted in 1998 by the mother of one of the alleged victims. An investigating police officer from the university eavesdropped on her exchange with Mr. Sandusky. That confrontation reads like a tragicomic tale with the victim's mother trying to worm it out of Mr. Sandusky if his contact with her son in the Penn State locker room showers was sexual in nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Human relations seemed so straightforward and basically workable before Edward Albee started looking into them. In 1961, the playwright dug so deeply beneath the skin to expose gnawing marital complexities in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" that audiences felt as naked and wounded as the characters by the end. Four decades later, Albee peeled away still more layers and, if anything, revealed even more uncomfortable relationships in "The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?" It wouldn't be surprising to see people with dazed looks stumbling out of Howard Community College's Studio Theatre after performances of Rep Stage's first-rate production of the Tony Award-winning "The Goat."
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | January 11, 2002
Given recent events, should we expect a kinder, cuddlier, less-well-attended Sundance Film Festival this year? To date, Sept. 11 has taken its toll on movie gatherings in Toronto, San Sebastian and Mill Valley. Last year's Sundance turnout topped 20,000. This year's event -- which got under way last night in Salt Lake City with the world premiere of The Laramie Project, with Steve Buscemi and Christina Ricci, is already a victim of Hollywood paranoia and belt-tightening. Organizers say there will be more security, and fewer studio reps trudging among the at-times makeshift venues, which include two hotel conference rooms and a library auditorium.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
A letter to the editor from Joan Butler published yesterday should have read, ". . . for the past 30 or more years the subject of intelligence has been taboo for the public at large, but not within the scientific community."The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | November 30, 1990
By margins not all neck-and-necks, ( Returns from the counties made wrecks& Of assorted careers;For instance, this year's Executive starts with an ex- Incumbents, said Quayle with a sneer, & The voters have had "up to here,"` Forgetting no doubtThat he's in, not out, And '92's awfully near. Most nations would urge a taboo On emitting still more CO2;Rising global degreesCould raise seven seas While Bush seeks a further review. # One wonders which we should dread more: ( Onrushing bankruptcy or war;Of course, we'd be loathTo suffer from both But it's hard to predict either/or.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Halfway through the Black Eyed Peas' live show, rapper Taboo hops on a neon-glowing motorcycle and, using suspension wires, rides it out above the crowd — all while singing "Rockin' to the Beat. " "You never expect a flying motorcycle to hover over your head during the show," he said. "It takes the show to a different level. " Inspired by the '80s movie "Tron," the motorcycle is one of the more eyebrow-raising moments in a concert that's loaded with dizzying lights, props and special effects.
NEWS
January 31, 1993
Japan is under foreign pressure to contribute more to world security but also to refrain from becoming a threat to its neighbors. It's a contradiction. Japan also is under pressure from its own citizens to exert more influence abroad and to hew scrupulously to constitutional pacifism. Another contradiction. The taboo on military action abroad remains. The taboo on discussing it is shattered.Some politicians in each of the three major parties favor holding a great debate on Article 9 of the 1947 constitution, imposed by U.S. occupation authorities after World War II, which "forever renounces" war and prohibits arming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
What's up this weekend? Some lucky  folks will be going to see Sade launch her first tour in a decade at 1st Mariner Arena, some folks will be gathering with their families on Father's Day, and some folks will be taking in the fun at the Baltimore Pride events around town. Some folks will be doing all of the above. I'm off to Starksboro, Vermont, for a wedding, with a stop in Nyack. Baltimore Pride kicks off tonight with an $85/person dinner at Gertrude's .  There were still tickets for Saturday night's Sade concert when I wrote this up. I gathered up some information about Father's Day promotions here . There really weren't so many of them, which makes sense.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | May 25, 2011
Sex, power, class and race. For all their differences, the scandals encircling French politician Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who is accused of sexually assaulting an African-born maid in New York, and Arnold Schwarzenegger, who has confessed to having a child out of wedlock with a Latina housekeeper, both conjure major taboos. The stories hold our attention not just because they involve powerful men brought down to size (always an American favorite) but because they remind us of the often-hidden history of interracial sex, and its roots in global migration, labor markets and social hierarchies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Halfway through the Black Eyed Peas' live show, rapper Taboo hops on a neon-glowing motorcycle and, using suspension wires, rides it out above the crowd — all while singing "Rockin' to the Beat. " "You never expect a flying motorcycle to hover over your head during the show," he said. "It takes the show to a different level. " Inspired by the '80s movie "Tron," the motorcycle is one of the more eyebrow-raising moments in a concert that's loaded with dizzying lights, props and special effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Human relations seemed so straightforward and basically workable before Edward Albee started looking into them. In 1961, the playwright dug so deeply beneath the skin to expose gnawing marital complexities in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" that audiences felt as naked and wounded as the characters by the end. Four decades later, Albee peeled away still more layers and, if anything, revealed even more uncomfortable relationships in "The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?" It wouldn't be surprising to see people with dazed looks stumbling out of Howard Community College's Studio Theatre after performances of Rep Stage's first-rate production of the Tony Award-winning "The Goat."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | June 24, 2008
He was cool. He was smart. He was dirty. And he was relentlessly funny. Speaking of dead people - the very words the man used in a recent routine on death - George Carlin died Sunday in California. That doesn't sound right or is the least bit funny, but if anyone could riff on death, it was Carlin. No subject was taboo - particularly taboo subjects, such as religion, drugs, sex and death, and sometimes in that order. His trail-brazing social commentary spanned more than four decades, forced a Supreme Court decision on broadcast indecency, and influenced top-shelf comedians such as Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld and Jon Stewart.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | October 22, 2007
When the moon is in the Seventh House and Jupiter aligns with Mars - or this Friday, whichever comes first - Opera Vivente will open its 10th anniversary season by taking a gloriously tuneful 1735 work by Handel and relocating the action and the mindset to the psychedelic, tie-dyed, free-lovin' 1960s. If You Go Alcina will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1 and 3 at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral St. Tickets $30-$50. Call 410-547-7997 or go to operavivente.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 7, 2003
Don't hate 'em. Although their latest album features the platinum-selling, "b-boy" style-appropriating Justin Timberlake, the Black Eyed Peas have not sold out with their third CD, Elephunk. The group simply wanted to expand its sound and its reach. In other words, the critically loved underground hip-hop trio with two commercially overlooked albums under its belt wants to sell records. And there's nothing wrong with that, says group member Taboo. The musical freshness fans have come to expect from BEP still pulsates through Elephunk.
NEWS
By ANDREW BARD SCHMOOKLER | June 23, 1995
Broadway, Virginia -- In our nation's capital, it has become more difficult to get from Capitol Hill to Georgetown. The reason, of course, is the need to take a detour around that anachronism on Pennsylvania Avenue.Why do I call the president's lovely mansion an anachronism? Is it necessarily anachronistic to have a stately country home sitting in the middle of a bustling modern city? That kind of anachronism we call ''charm.''What doesn't fit between this place and our times is the growing difficulty of keeping its occupant -- our head of state -- from being murdered.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | August 8, 2007
Each week, my inbox fills up quickly with surveys that explore some aspect of the workplace, some serious, some light-hearted. Here's a sampling of recent surveys that can be used for watercooler fodder or a good laugh: A survey commissioned by Diet Pepsi Max, a highly caffeinated new soda, found that 50 percent of 1,102 respondents have caught someone asleep on the job, while 28 percent have fallen asleep at work themselves. Apparently, auto mechanics have the highest rate of on-the-job snoozing at 65 percent, followed by government workers at 51 percent.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | June 29, 2007
A new requirement that Anne Arundel County police personnel cover up their tattoos - even if it forces bike patrol or animal control officers to don long sleeves, pants or turtlenecks in scorching heat - has the rank and file hot and bothered. The week-old policy, among the strictest in the state, requires that all personnel, including volunteers, cover up visible tattoos when they are on duty. The aim of the policy shift is "to promote the uniformity of appearance ... to maintain neutrality ... to foster discipline and to encourage public confidence," according to a memo sent a week ago by Col. James E. Teare Sr., the police chief.
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