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By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
From Liz Atwood: If your tween doesn't have a smart phone or tablet yet, I'll bet it's on the Christmas wish list. Yet as pervasive as mobile devices are, I was still astounded to see a new study from the Verizon Foundation that shows more than one third of middle school students are doing their homework with the help of a smart phone or tablet. The study found smartphone use crossing income levels and ethnicity. Nearly a third of children from the poorest households said they used smartphones for homework.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
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FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | August 17, 1993
When you exercise in hot weather, you sweat and lose a lot of salt. That doesn't mean that you need to take salt tablets. The use of salt tablets is recommended only if their benefits exceed their side effects.If you lose more salt than you take in, your muscles will start to hurt and cramp. You will feel tired and sick and develop a headache. You can even pass out. Taking salt tablets would replace the lost salt; however, they have side effects. They can irritate your stomach lining and make you throw up, and they can thicken your blood enough to cause clots in your arteries.
MOBILE
July 1, 2014
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FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | April 30, 1991
Consistently warm weather is on its way. Those of you who work hard and sweat profusely under the sun are going to lose salt from your bodies. As a result, some of you may be tempted to take salt tablets in order to put back what your body is missing. Well, don't do it -- unless your physician recommends it.More than 30 years ago, people active in hot weather were given salt tablets. But, rarely do doctors recommend that approach to salt replacement today.Salt tablets can irritate your stomach linings and make you vomit.
NEWS
By William Mullen and William Mullen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 29, 1998
CHICAGO -- Writing, wheeled carts, the 60-minute hour, sailboats and seed plows are among the things a people called the Sumerians invented in the fabled Fertile Crescent about 5,000 years ago. They also left behind evidence of the earliest known wheedling and whining adolescents.That comes down to us because the Sumerians had the good sense to devise a system of writing called "cuneiform." They pressed wedge-shaped indentations into soft clay tablets, drying the tablets in the sun or firing them in ovens.
NEWS
By Elisa Ung and Elisa Ung,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 23, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Kim Bondarenko says her insurance company is making it harder for her to get OxyContin, the drug that annihilated her severe neurological pain and let her go back to work. Orthopedic surgeon Norman A. Johanson has shied away from prescribing it after hearing about the region's recent spike in deaths linked to abuse of the drug. And pain specialists across the country are concerned that increased vigilance in administering OxyContin may be causing people to suffer needlessly.
NEWS
By Benedict Carey and Benedict Carey,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2002
Getting a drug prescription to treat a simple infection isn't always so simple. Drug prices are on the rise, doctor visits can be time-consuming and expensive, and 40 million Americans have no insurance to help pay. For many, it's easier to get drugs for a pet cat or fish -- and take those pills. Animals are prescribed many of the same medications humans are, sometimes for the same conditions, and there are plenty of Internet sites providing advice on drug dosage. "The use of animal antibiotics without prescription is a major issue for us," said Dr. Don Klingborg, associate dean of public programs at the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | February 9, 1993
9 students suspended on LSD-related chargesBEL AIR -- Nine Bel Air High School students were suspended and an 18-year-old Baltimore man was arrested on charges of selling them LSD tablets, police said yesterday.Police did not release the man's name, but called him the students' supplier. When arrested, he had 119 LSD tablets, police said.Assistant Principal David Volrath requested the police investigation Friday.Eight boys and one girl between 14 and 16 years of age were suspended. Seven of the nine suspended students had the hallucinogenic drug in their possession, police said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 13, 1998
County police arrested a Glen Burnie couple Wednesday on drug charges after raiding their home and finding more than 2,000 tablets of drugs prescribed for pain and anxiety with a street value of $7,165.Joann Beck, 39, and Scott A. Risso, 35, of the 500 block of Milton Ave. were charged with drug distribution and drug possession.Police said they had been investigating the couple since August and raided their house about 10: 30 a.m. Police seized tablets of hydrocodone, alprazolam and diazepam, a small amount of marijuana and $3,822.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
From sprawling Los Angeles to tiny Talbot County on Maryland's Eastern Shore, educators are experimenting with the next wave of technology in schools: a tablet or laptop in every student's hand. The results have drawn national attention - for both their embarrassing failures and their successes. Now Baltimore County is moving ahead with a five-year, $150 million rollout that will make it the first large school system in the state to plunge into the ambitious and potentially risky initiative.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The igloo-like snow globe in the middle of the Annapolis mall caught the eye of James Soni. The three-year-old darted inside, pulling his mother and father along. The family, told they could dress up and appear in a short, slow-motion video, was filmed in two takes tossing snowballs in the air, to the delight of their son. The gigantic globe, which doubles as a mini production studio, is clearly the centerpiece of Google's new retail venture: Temporary shops set up in six locations nationwide, including Westfield Annapolis mall.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler's proposal to give state prison inmates tablet computers so they can search for jobs and stay in touch with family while incarcerated would be terrific if money were available ( "Gansler proposes tablet computers for inmates," Aug. 5). But I think we might better spend $500 per tablet on providing the devices to our schoolchildren so they can learn basic math and English. Perhaps that way they wouldn't end up as prison inmates in the first place.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler's proposal to supply state prisoners with tablet computers exemplifies just how out of touch he is with the average Marylander (" Gansler proposes tablet computers for inmates," Aug. 5). Mr. Gansler must believe that it is OK to recklessly spend our tax dollars on ill-advised projects such as this one. It is time for us to let Mr. Gansler and other elected officials know that we will not sit idly by and watch them squander away our money.
NEWS
By Jenn Aiosa | July 15, 2013
If there's one thing nearly everybody in the Chesapeake Bay region can agree upon, it's that summer isn't summer without blue crabs. Unfortunately, this regional staple has experienced its share of problems over the past few years, impacting supply, prices and the livelihoods of all those who work in the crabbing industry. Thankfully, recent leadership from Maryland watermen has put this fishery on a course to produce more crabs and more profits. For more than two years, Maryland watermen and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
From Liz Atwood: If your tween doesn't have a smart phone or tablet yet, I'll bet it's on the Christmas wish list. Yet as pervasive as mobile devices are, I was still astounded to see a new study from the Verizon Foundation that shows more than one third of middle school students are doing their homework with the help of a smart phone or tablet. The study found smartphone use crossing income levels and ethnicity. Nearly a third of children from the poorest households said they used smartphones for homework.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | April 25, 1991
Criminal charges were filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against the former vice president and director of research and development for Vitrine Pharmaceuticals Inc. of New York, alleging that he submitted rigged test results to win approval of three generic drugs from the Food and Drug Administration.Steven Colton, 39, now living near Denver, is charged in a criminal information with three counts of making false statements to the FDA on three of Vitarine's products: verapamil hydrochloride sustained-release tablets, for angina; albuterol sulfate extended-release tablets, for asthma; and triamterene hydrochlorothiazide capsules, for hypertension.
NEWS
September 8, 2007
A Catonsville man was sentenced to six months' home detention and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service for distributing vials and tablets of anabolic steroids over the Internet, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore. Michael Schlanger, 48, a former personal trainer for Bally's Total Fitness in Glen Burnie, was arrested last year after federal authorities said they intercepted a package of steroids at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. Prosecutors said Schlanger imported the drugs from foreign sources and had them sent to rented mailboxes reserved in phony names.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
In one Baltimore County school next semester, students will swap notebooks for 1-inch touch screens, textbook passages for online articles, worksheets for apps, and writing utensils for a keyboard, launching the first "paperless classroom" in a county school. The program is a pilot with 70 middle-school students enrolled at the Loch Raven Technical Academy's law and finance magnet program, a distinctive program that teachers say requires students to navigate digital platforms to keep up with the fast-paced fields of study.
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