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November 18, 2012
Just in time for the holiday is this decorative dark putty shard tree by MacKenzie-Childs, the furniture and ceramics company based in upstate New York known for its whimsical handcrafted designs. Sold at Neiman Marcus, Saks Fith Avenue, and other boutiques and retailers, fans of MacKenzie-Childs include Kourtney Kardashian and Goldie Hawn. This 20-inch-high tree is handmade by artisans who work with ceramic shards of items like teacups and flower pots to create a one-of-a-kind product.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Shin Chon Garden is popular to the point of overflowing. Even on a drizzly weeknight, the tables at this Ellicott City restaurant are full of diners. A friend, arriving a few minutes before I did, texted: "place smells AMAZING. " When Andrew Zimmern, the host of the long-running Travel Channel show "Bizarre Foods," came to Shin Chon Garden last summer, he told the world, via Twitter, that Shin Chon "is one of top ten Korean BBQ experiences in America. A must for anyone who loves food.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 23, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Sprawled across a tabletop in a Northern Virginia office building are the armies of Saddam Hussein, moving by tens of thousands deep into Saudi Arabia and threatening the left flank of the U.S. Army.What happens next is up to Mark Herman, a war-game designer and strategy consultant who is giving orders for both sides. He launched the whole thing on a huge map marked off in hexagons with small chips of cardboard representing units of opposing forces.Yes, it's a game, one of several U.S.-Iraq war games that will soon be available at hobby shops.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012
Just in time for the holiday is this decorative dark putty shard tree by MacKenzie-Childs, the furniture and ceramics company based in upstate New York known for its whimsical handcrafted designs. Sold at Neiman Marcus, Saks Fith Avenue, and other boutiques and retailers, fans of MacKenzie-Childs include Kourtney Kardashian and Goldie Hawn. This 20-inch-high tree is handmade by artisans who work with ceramic shards of items like teacups and flower pots to create a one-of-a-kind product.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 13, 1998
This time of year, I look at the artfully decorated rooms in magazines, and I want them. Handmade garlands of bittersweet and Russian olive around doorways, kissing balls of boxwood and strung cranberries at the entryway, sprigs of holly in windows held by a dollop of beeswax. I want it all. But the realities of time preclude it. Fortunately, there's tabletop topiary.Topiary, the art of pruning a plant into a geometric or whimsical ornamental shape, has been practiced by horticulturists and amateurs alike since Roman times.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | October 8, 1995
A roundup of new products and servicesTwo cool ideasInstead of cluttering your refrigerator with magnets and junk mail, why not turn it into a decorative display with two new products from Mine Design? Magnetic Fridge Clock comes with individually movable magnetic clock pieces and a quartz crystal movement. Priced at $37.50, the clock is available in 20 designs.Don't need another clock? Use your refrigerator to display your favorite famous work of art. Magnetic Masterpiece Puzzle is a collection of six paintings turned into puzzles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | June 15, 2006
More than 70 local government and organization leaders designed tabletop doors for an exhibit at the Columbia Art Center. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., broadcast journalist Denise Koch, Howard County School Board members, animal rights activists, healthcare professionals and others contributed works to Opening Doors: Making a Difference. The collages, paintings and mixed media applied to the doors share meaningful events in the "artists'" lives that brought them to where they are today. "Some are very cryptic in their symbolism; some very direct," said director Rebecca Bafford.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Shin Chon Garden is popular to the point of overflowing. Even on a drizzly weeknight, the tables at this Ellicott City restaurant are full of diners. A friend, arriving a few minutes before I did, texted: "place smells AMAZING. " When Andrew Zimmern, the host of the long-running Travel Channel show "Bizarre Foods," came to Shin Chon Garden last summer, he told the world, via Twitter, that Shin Chon "is one of top ten Korean BBQ experiences in America. A must for anyone who loves food.
FEATURES
By ANNE FARROW and ANNE FARROW,HARTFORD COURANT | March 4, 2006
Few things are more soothing than the sound of falling water. At the same time that outdoor fountains are popular again -- having been part of the garden landscape for at least 2,000 years -- the indoor fountain has made its way into bedrooms, living rooms and home offices. Garden centers, gift shops and numerous Web sites offer fountains appropriate for the home environment. And whether you're looking for a small, table-size fountain with a bamboo pipe pouring water over stones, or a wall-size unit with water rippling in front of a Renaissance painting, it's out there.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 17, 1995
We recently purchased a 50-year-old home. Its interior architecture is traditional; the foyer includes crown moldings as well as a staircase with a wooden handrail and spindles. This seems to be a good place for a more modern design direction. Do you have some suggestions?Bold colors, unadorned surfaces and simple forms transform a traditional space into a more modern setting. And to illustrate these elements, I've chosen this photo of an entrance hall remodeled by Michael Graves.A designer as well as an architect, Mr. Graves has retained the American look of this foyer while avoiding standard decorative motifs.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2008
Even if you're trying to economize this holiday, you don't have to give up greenery. For as little as $8, you can make a potted topiary plant that will not only enliven your holiday table this year, but in holidays to come. "They're easy to care for and they last for years," says Steven Winterfeldt, a horticulturist at Jackson & Perkins, a nursery in Hodges, S.C. Topiaries are living plants that have been trained into distinctive shapes, an art form that started with the Greeks and Romans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | June 15, 2006
More than 70 local government and organization leaders designed tabletop doors for an exhibit at the Columbia Art Center. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., broadcast journalist Denise Koch, Howard County School Board members, animal rights activists, healthcare professionals and others contributed works to Opening Doors: Making a Difference. The collages, paintings and mixed media applied to the doors share meaningful events in the "artists'" lives that brought them to where they are today. "Some are very cryptic in their symbolism; some very direct," said director Rebecca Bafford.
FEATURES
By ANNE FARROW and ANNE FARROW,HARTFORD COURANT | March 4, 2006
Few things are more soothing than the sound of falling water. At the same time that outdoor fountains are popular again -- having been part of the garden landscape for at least 2,000 years -- the indoor fountain has made its way into bedrooms, living rooms and home offices. Garden centers, gift shops and numerous Web sites offer fountains appropriate for the home environment. And whether you're looking for a small, table-size fountain with a bamboo pipe pouring water over stones, or a wall-size unit with water rippling in front of a Renaissance painting, it's out there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crayton Harrison and Crayton Harrison,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 30, 2004
The desktop PC, an icon of American computing, is fading into the background. While the traditional desktop still accounts for about 70 percent of shipments, computer buyers increasingly see it as just one of many options. Even as manufacturers ship out millions of traditional box-plus-monitor setups, their market dominance is being challenged as never before. Laptop shipments are growing at double the rate of that of desktops, and could grab the lead as soon as 2007. Prices for laptops are closer than ever to their tethered cousins, so more and more of them are ending up in the hands of personal users, not just corporate road warriors.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | April 25, 2004
YOU SOCCER nuts may find this startling because there's been no publicity buildup, whatsoever. But an international soccer tournament is on the agenda for an Ellicott City middle school's gym next weekend. This tournament's to have 30 or so entrants, several of them local - demonstrating yet again there's simply no lack of interest in any aspect of the sport in Howard County. Competitors from Europe - not to mention one of Sri Lankan heritage and a reputation for wickedly speedy play - will be flying or driving in to compete at Patapsco Middle School on Saturday and next Sunday.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | October 19, 2003
Kenneth Jay Lane has long been known as jeweler to the stars, having designed pieces for Jackie O, Elizabeth Taylor and Audrey Hepburn. Now he's venturing into new territory, creating his own Home Gift Collection of jewelry-inspired frames, napkin rings, votive candle holders, place-card holders and boxes, all available to the public. Pictured above, center, is the Elaborate Pave Frame With Carved Stone, which fits a 3 1/2 -by-5-inch photo and retails for $300. Animals and other critters feature prominently in his jewelry as well as in this collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 5, 2000
The trains were only some of the sights on display at the B&O Railroad Museum's "Second Annual Halloween Midnight Masquerade and Costume Ball." How about that geisha who greeted you at the door, the Hunchback of Notre Dame hobbling about, or the ghoulish waiter offering you "finger food"(as in severed fingers) on a silver tray? And they were only the hired help. This was a shindig in which 250 costumed guests went all out in raising $6,000 for the museum. Take Linda Sherman. The WQSR morning show personality came with a lampshade on her head.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | September 7, 1992
Half a million soldiers are fighting a historic battle at Fort Meade this holiday weekend.The troops are strictly 19th-century cavalry and artillery men from France and Russia, but their commanders come from places like Baltimore, Columbia, Silver Spring, Georgia and even England.War game strategists gathered Saturday at Fort Meade and are still joined today in a tabletop war with miniatures -- on the anniversary of the Battle of Borodino, a major fight in Napoleon's drive on Moscow 180 years ago.The outcome this time doesn't appear to be much different from what it was on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | June 19, 2003
Got game? If so, make your way to the Baltimore Convention Center tomorrow and Saturday. The annual Games Day, sponsored by Games Workshop, a producer of tabletop battle games, features gaming events for everyone from beginners to experts. Participants (or "gamers") can take part in registered games, open gaming, the Games Day tournaments and the Golden Demon Painting Competition. Or visitors can watch Sabertooth Games demonstrations, meet guests from the Games Workshop design studio and attend gaming seminars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 5, 2000
The trains were only some of the sights on display at the B&O Railroad Museum's "Second Annual Halloween Midnight Masquerade and Costume Ball." How about that geisha who greeted you at the door, the Hunchback of Notre Dame hobbling about, or the ghoulish waiter offering you "finger food"(as in severed fingers) on a silver tray? And they were only the hired help. This was a shindig in which 250 costumed guests went all out in raising $6,000 for the museum. Take Linda Sherman. The WQSR morning show personality came with a lampshade on her head.
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