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NEWS
August 8, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler's proposal to give state prison inmates tablet computers so they can search for jobs and stay in touch with family while incarcerated would be terrific if money were available ( "Gansler proposes tablet computers for inmates," Aug. 5). But I think we might better spend $500 per tablet on providing the devices to our schoolchildren so they can learn basic math and English. Perhaps that way they wouldn't end up as prison inmates in the first place.
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MOBILE
July 1, 2014
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler pushed a novel solution Monday for closing what he called the "revolving door" of ex-offenders returning to prisons. Give inmates tablet computers. As Gansler envisions it, the proposal would help offenders build both education credentials and social support before they leave prison. The gubernatorial hopeful says the wireless devices would replace brick-and-mortar libraries and classrooms in the state's prison system, providing each inmate with an Android tablet that could connect with e-books, the state's library system, law resources and online learning programs.
NEWS
November 11, 2013
The following is compiled from police reports. It is the Baltimore Messenger's policy to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Baltimore City Police Department's Northern District at 410-396-2455. Bellona Avenue 5800 block at 6:25 a.m. Someone tried to gain entry through balcony, but fled when confronted by resident. North Calvert Street 3200 block, between 3 and 3:15 p.m. Nov. 9. Hewlett Packard laptop, recorder, two computer mouses, flash drive, tote bags among items stolen from vehicle.
MOBILE
July 1, 2014
This site automatically adjusts its presentation according to your device. (If you're on a desktop or laptop computer, change the width of your browser window to see what the site looks like at different screen sizes.) Readers visiting our desktop site on smartphones like iPhones and Android phones and on tablet computers like iPads and Kindle Fires are automatically redirected to this smartphone- and tablet-friendly site. They can still access the desktop site by tapping the "Visit our desktop site" link in the footer.
NEWS
November 11, 2013
The following is compiled from police reports. It is the Baltimore Messenger's policy to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Baltimore City Police Department's Northern District at 410-396-2455. Bellona Avenue 5800 block at 6:25 a.m. Someone tried to gain entry through balcony, but fled when confronted by resident. North Calvert Street 3200 block, between 3 and 3:15 p.m. Nov. 9. Hewlett Packard laptop, recorder, two computer mouses, flash drive, tote bags among items stolen from vehicle.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
This fall, the hit course on some college campuses may very well be iPad 101. At the University of Maryland, administrators plan to hand out Apple iPads to about 60 students, part of a new two-year program called Digital Culture and Creativity that immerses students in new technologies and focuses on the potential of the iPad to shake up the campus experience. The iPad has experienced early success in the consumer market, with more than 3 million sold since April, and it's already going back to school.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2013
Timing is everything — in love, comedy, trapeze acts, pastry and politics. Of course, to be successful in any of those ventures, you need keen senses, a super awareness of things, even prescience. But no matter how big your brain, your timing is critical. On this count, a couple of candidates for Maryland governor need work. Anthony Brown, the lieutenant governor, is so eager for a promotion, he declared his candidacy way before anyone cared. The early jump helps him lock up campaign contributions, but he risks peaking too soon.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Maryland transit police are warning travelers to be alert on trains and buses, amid a long-running rash of mobile-device thefts targeting riders who were texting, listening to music or talking on the phone. The Maryland Transit Administration has logged more than 200 such incidents since it began tracking them at the beginning of last year in response to a series of customer complaints. A spike in these crimes followed the 2011 release of Apple's iPhone 4S, and the trend has kept up, with thieves taking music players, e-readers and tablet computers.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
You would be able to play games, read electronic books, listen to music, watch movies and choose from nearly 140,000 smart-phone applications - all while on the go with Apple Inc.'s new iPad. The question is whether you would want or need such a device, and be willing to pay $499 or more for it. After months of hype that culminated in days of water-cooler speculation, Apple unveiled Wednesday the highly anticipated iPad, essentially a personal computer contained in a portable flat-panel touch screen.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler's proposal to give state prison inmates tablet computers so they can search for jobs and stay in touch with family while incarcerated would be terrific if money were available ( "Gansler proposes tablet computers for inmates," Aug. 5). But I think we might better spend $500 per tablet on providing the devices to our schoolchildren so they can learn basic math and English. Perhaps that way they wouldn't end up as prison inmates in the first place.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler's proposal to supply state prisoners with tablet computers exemplifies just how out of touch he is with the average Marylander (" Gansler proposes tablet computers for inmates," Aug. 5). Mr. Gansler must believe that it is OK to recklessly spend our tax dollars on ill-advised projects such as this one. It is time for us to let Mr. Gansler and other elected officials know that we will not sit idly by and watch them squander away our money.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2013
Timing is everything — in love, comedy, trapeze acts, pastry and politics. Of course, to be successful in any of those ventures, you need keen senses, a super awareness of things, even prescience. But no matter how big your brain, your timing is critical. On this count, a couple of candidates for Maryland governor need work. Anthony Brown, the lieutenant governor, is so eager for a promotion, he declared his candidacy way before anyone cared. The early jump helps him lock up campaign contributions, but he risks peaking too soon.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Maryland transit police are warning travelers to be alert on trains and buses, amid a long-running rash of mobile-device thefts targeting riders who were texting, listening to music or talking on the phone. The Maryland Transit Administration has logged more than 200 such incidents since it began tracking them at the beginning of last year in response to a series of customer complaints. A spike in these crimes followed the 2011 release of Apple's iPhone 4S, and the trend has kept up, with thieves taking music players, e-readers and tablet computers.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
This fall, the hit course on some college campuses may very well be iPad 101. At the University of Maryland, administrators plan to hand out Apple iPads to about 60 students, part of a new two-year program called Digital Culture and Creativity that immerses students in new technologies and focuses on the potential of the iPad to shake up the campus experience. The iPad has experienced early success in the consumer market, with more than 3 million sold since April, and it's already going back to school.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
Dave Oberholzer has been tracking his iPad since it left China a couple of days ago on its way to his Maryland home. The wireless industry consultant, who lives in Brookeville, can't wait to try out the new device, but he figures his gadget-loving daughters will monopolize it and that he won't get the most use out of it until traveling for work. "They're going to be all over it," said Oberholzer, 42. "There's no doubt. I'll barely be able to touch the thing." Few companies can get consumers so excited that they'll buy a product they haven't actually touched, yet that's what Apple Inc. has managed to do with its iPad.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
Dave Oberholzer has been tracking his iPad since it left China a couple of days ago on its way to his Maryland home. The wireless industry consultant, who lives in Brookeville, can't wait to try out the new device, but he figures his gadget-loving daughters will monopolize it and that he won't get the most use out of it until traveling for work. "They're going to be all over it," said Oberholzer, 42. "There's no doubt. I'll barely be able to touch the thing." Few companies can get consumers so excited that they'll buy a product they haven't actually touched, yet that's what Apple Inc. has managed to do with its iPad.
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