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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 26, 1991
Perdue Farms Inc. in Salisbury is offering a free recipe booklet for use with its "Perdue Done It!" line of barbecued and oven-roasted half chickens, breasts, thighs and drumsticks.The booklet is available by writing "Perdue Easy Does It!" P.O. box 2417 E, Salisbury, Md. 21802.7+ Here are some recipes from the booklet:Creole Dip2/3 cup bottled chili sauce1 tablespoon prepared horseradish, optional1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley1 tablespoon minced scallion1 tablespoon minced celeryIn small bowl, combine all ingredients.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Florence Martin , originally from Paris and now residing in Baltimore, was looking for a recipe for making a traditional American Jewish-style beef brisket. Dolores Keene from Baltimore sent in her favorite brisket recipe, which comes from "Mama Cooks California Style, New Twists on Jewish Classics," a 1997 cookbook put out by the Jewish Home for the Aging of Los Angeles. I decided to test this recipe out on my family for Rosh Hashanah dinner this year. It received rave reviews.
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NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Newsday | March 25, 2007
Flank steak is lean, flavorful, and fast and easy to cook. Because it is lean, it should be cooked with care: It is at its most moist and flavorful served medium rare. Regardless of how you cook it, flank steak should be cut across the grain into very thin strips before serving. While the ingredients list for this recipe may be long, the time it takes to prepare this dish is very short. PAN-SEARED FLANK STEAK WITH THAI DRESSING Serves 4 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons water 1/8 teaspoon Asian chile paste (or to taste)
HEALTH
By Ellen Loreck, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Ellen Loreck weighs in on sodium. According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, people should consume between 1,500 and 2,300 mgs of sodium per day. That's equal to about 2/3 to 1 teaspoon of salt, which isn't much. Most of the sodium comes from processed foods, so eating out becomes a challenge.
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine | August 26, 1998
It's that blessed time of year when dinner is simple and fun - when every night can be a cookout. But let's face it. An endless rotation of plain grilled chicken, fish and meat gets a bit boring. That's why we created an array of marinades guaranteed to keep your summer sizzling with flavor. With a little time - and virtually no effort - you can have chicken imbued with orange and thyme, shrimp with pineapple and chipotle peppers, or eggplant redolent of miso and ginger. To get started, here are marinades to suit any mood, suggestions for how to use each one and a chart of marinating and grilling times.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1992
YOU CAN'T GO wrong serving this nifty cake to hungry Super Bowl fans. The recipe, from Duncan Hines, makes between 12 and 16 servings.Football Cake1 package devil's food cake mix1 16-ounce container chocolate frosting3/4 cup confectioners sugar2 tablespoons shortening1 tablespoon cold water1 tablespoon non-dairy creamer1/4 teaspoon vanilla extractDash saltA5 Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour 10-inch round cake pan. Prepare cake following package directions. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 to 55 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | April 8, 1998
Passover substitutionsHere are some easy substitutions for forbidden foods from Zell Schulman's new book on Passover Sedarim, "Let My People Eat!" (Macmillan, $27.50):* For 1 cup flour: 5/8 cup matzo cake meal or potato starch* For 1 tablespoon vanilla: 2 packets Kosher for Passover vanilla sugar* For confectioners' sugar: 1 cup minus 1/2 tablespoon granulated sugar pulverized in a blender and sifted together with 1 1/2 tablespoons potato starch* For 1 ounce chocolate: 3 tablespoons cocoa and 1 tablespoon shorteningChowing down on seafood chiliIt's Maryland's answer to the popularity of Tex-Mex fare: Gordon's Chesapeake Chili, manufactured by Mid-Atlantic Foods.
FEATURES
By Gail Perrin and Gail Perrin,Boston Globe | March 13, 1991
March is National Nutrition Month and here are some health tips to carry you along.* Choose foods low in fat to cut calories. An ounce of fat has more than twice the calories of carbohydrates or proteins. For instance, by substituting jam for butter or margarine on your morning toast, you save 60 calories per tablespoon.* Eliminate one tablespoon of fat every day for a year and you could lose ten pounds.* Walking one mile per day for one year burns 36,500 calories and can take off ten pounds.
FEATURES
By Ruth Cousineau and Ruth Cousineau,EATING WELL | October 25, 1998
Canned soup tends to be one of those fine, old-fashioned pantry basics that rarely warrant a second thought: Simply open, heat and eat. Lentil soup, however, which is quite nutritious as well as convenient, can be turned into a distinctly modern meal without a lot of effort.One cup of canned lentil soup has only 140 calories, 2 grams of fat and 7 grams of dietary fiber. At 9 grams per serving, it's a good source of protein as well.Here are some lentil soup quickies.Spicy SizzleIn a saucepan, bring one 19-ounce can lentil soup and 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice to a simmer.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | December 5, 2007
The small fruit of the towering date palm tree grows in large bunches of more than 20 pounds, with up to 1,000 dates per bunch. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, by Alan Davidson, dates are originally from North Africa and the Middle East, but most dates sold in the United States are grown in California, where they flourish in very hot, desert conditions. The fruit is 1 to 2 inches long, thin-skinned, with a soft, yielding, very sweet flesh wrapped around a long, narrow pit. Dates have a high sugar content, making them a good source of energy with no fat. They also provide some fiber, protein and vitamin A, and a good bit of potassium.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | December 5, 2007
The small fruit of the towering date palm tree grows in large bunches of more than 20 pounds, with up to 1,000 dates per bunch. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, by Alan Davidson, dates are originally from North Africa and the Middle East, but most dates sold in the United States are grown in California, where they flourish in very hot, desert conditions. The fruit is 1 to 2 inches long, thin-skinned, with a soft, yielding, very sweet flesh wrapped around a long, narrow pit. Dates have a high sugar content, making them a good source of energy with no fat. They also provide some fiber, protein and vitamin A, and a good bit of potassium.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
It's soft-shell crab season in Maryland. Benjamin Erjavec, executive chef of the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East, has this simple way to dress them up. CORNMEAL-CRUSTED MARYLAND SOFT-SHELL CRABS WITH TARRAGON BEURRE BLANC Serves 6 as an appetizer or 3 as a main course 6 soft-shell crabs, cleaned 2 cups buttermilk 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup white wine 1/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 pound...
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Newsday | March 25, 2007
Flank steak is lean, flavorful, and fast and easy to cook. Because it is lean, it should be cooked with care: It is at its most moist and flavorful served medium rare. Regardless of how you cook it, flank steak should be cut across the grain into very thin strips before serving. While the ingredients list for this recipe may be long, the time it takes to prepare this dish is very short. PAN-SEARED FLANK STEAK WITH THAI DRESSING Serves 4 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons water 1/8 teaspoon Asian chile paste (or to taste)
NEWS
By RUSS PARSONS and RUSS PARSONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
Author David "Mas" Masumoto, a short, square 52-year-old with a quick smile and work-hardened hands, is probably the most famous fruit farmer in America. His peaches, which are almost entirely sold to restaurants and a few select markets, are featured by name on some of the finest menus in the country -- Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., the French Laundry in Napa Valley, Calif., and Per Se in Manhattan. The peaches, grown in California's Central Valley, have been selected for the "Ark of Taste" of fruits and vegetables recognized by the international organization Slow Food.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | May 11, 2005
Some folks may argue with Dana Jacobi's choices of the 12 most beneficial foods, but because chocolate makes the list, I won't be one of them. The goal of the 12 Best Foods Cookbook (Rodale, 2005, $21.95) is to give readers recipes that feature those super foods that scientists tell us have health benefits because of their nutrients and antioxidants. This dynamic dozen includes: blueberries, black beans, broccoli, chocolate, oatmeal, onions, salmon, soy, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and walnuts.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
Mildred E. Rickel of Bridgeville, Pa., requested a recipe for a salmon spread. She wrote: "Years ago, there was a salmon-spread recipe going around and I had a copper fish mold for it and I still do, but I no longer have the recipe. I would appreciate your help." Her response came from Jesse L. Ault of Gibson Island, who called her recipe Festive Salmon Spread. Festive Salmon Spread Makes 2 1/2 cups one 1-pound can salmon 1 tablespoon chopped capers 2 tablespoons bottled horseradish 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley 1/2 cup mayonnaise salt and pepper to taste Carefully remove any bits of bone from salmon and flake it into a big bowl.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
The St. James luxury condominium homes and Baltimore-area celebrities joined forces recently to share summer entertaining secrets while raising money for charity. "A Perfect Setting" which takes place throughout the St. James decorated models, located at 3704 N. Charles St., runs through June 10.The event, open to the public and free of charge, features seasonal tabletops and patio set-ups designed by local celebrities. The St. James will make a donation to the charity of each participating celebrity's choice, such as Animal Rescue, The Baltimore School for the Arts and House of Ruth-Baltimore Inc. For more information call 467-3704.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
It's soft-shell crab season in Maryland. Benjamin Erjavec, executive chef of the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East, has this simple way to dress them up. CORNMEAL-CRUSTED MARYLAND SOFT-SHELL CRABS WITH TARRAGON BEURRE BLANC Serves 6 as an appetizer or 3 as a main course 6 soft-shell crabs, cleaned 2 cups buttermilk 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/2 cup white wine 1/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 pound...
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | June 18, 2000
Now that we've had a stretch of sizzling weather, it's time to sizzle some shrimp -- or, as we say in Baltimore, "shrimps" -- on the grill. Even though you can cook them in almost any season, I prefer to wait until it is "barefoot weather" to start grilling my "shrimps." That is because I associate grilled shrimp with spending a week at the beach; a stretch of time when footwear and most outwear is minimal. I won't be bound for the beach for several weeks, but the recent stretch of hot weather got me thinking about the ocean, kicking off my shoes and grilling some shrimps.
FEATURES
By Emily Green and Emily Green,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 6, 1999
When it comes to the ripest, juiciest and sweetest of plums, the obvious way to eat them is to wrap oneself in a towel and gorge.But we don't live in an ideal world, and plums of that perfection can be hard to find. Fortunately, there's something about plums that makes them good to eat even when they're not at their absolute best. There's that tartness that rescues average plums when peaches, nectarines or berries of similar quality would fail.What is it about plums that gives them their uniquely puckery quality?
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