Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTablecloth
IN THE NEWS

Tablecloth

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 11, 1999
Lynn Patrick, who made a name for himself around here as a manager and part owner of the Milton Inn and then restaurant manager of Hamilton's in the Admiral Fell Inn, has a new restaurant in the works. He and his associates will be opening what he calls "a bistro with white tablecloth capability" in the late summer or early fall.The partners have a location (in the Carlyle Apartments at 500 W. University Parkway where the Dragon Palace used to be), an architect for the renovation (Rebecca Swanston)
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Wedding Date: June 23, 2012 Her story: Christina Schoppert, 30, grew up in Homeland and now lives in Hampden. She is a lawyer with Community Law Center, Inc., which represents organizations working on neighborhood revitalization efforts. Her father, Gary Schoppert, is a retired general dentist. Her mother, Joan Schoppert, is a recently retired assistant professor of English at Notre Dame of Maryland University, although she is still teaching there part-time. His story: Andrew Devereux, 38, grew up in Charlottesville, Va., and now lives in Los Angeles, where he is finishing a post-doctoral fellowship at UCLA.
Advertisement
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
Art fakery has been pandemic since people first began fashioning objects of particular beauty. Greeks, Romans, Medieval and Renaissance man - they all did it. The 20th Century has offered a wild bazaar of the stuff. Even great artists indulged in it: Donatello, possibly Benvenuto Cellini. Raphael? One of the better stories relates to him.Raphael, young and poor, was in a hotel with no money to pay the bill. So he painted a stack of coins on his hotel room table cloth. The glitter of the coins on the table delayed the owner long enough to allow the starving artist to make a getaway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Timothy Dean may have finally found his niche - and it's at the mall. Last month, the chef, best known in Baltimore for his string of restaurants on Eastern Avenue (and his appearance on the seventh season of "Top Chef"), opened Timothy Dean Burger in the Boulevard at the Capital Centre. The vibe is fast food, but the food - burgers, fries and gourmet pizzas - is worthy of white tablecloths. Over the past few years, the celebrity chef has weathered a string of well-publicized setbacks.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Roland Jeannier has hung up his saucepan. The 73-year-old French chef is retiring and has sold Jeannier's, his 100-seat white-tablecloth restaurant known for classic fare, velvety sauces and luscious desserts. Its closing marks the end of what was one of the bastions of French food in Baltimore for the past 20 years. Jeannier's was beloved by many for some of the same reasons that others were put off by it -- a fixed menu and a formal sensibility at a time when much of the restaurant industry was moving toward a lighter, more casual style of dining.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 24, 1992
The tablecloth might be 100 years old, maybe older. Or maybe it's my age. Anyway, I feel old ironing it. But it is still a thing of beauty.With intricate blue cross-stitch on the border, pastel flowers in each corner and a cornucopia centerpiece, it's a masterpiece of needlework.I hate to iron, always have. I will scrub your floor, but don't bring me your ironing. I thought I retired the iron when I retired.As I stand here pressing the large cloth, however, I am thinking that Thanksgiving is a splendid holiday.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | December 4, 1993
HTC Around the house* When making outdoor holiday decorations using fruit, dip apples, pears and citrus into acrylic floor wax. Let dry. This will protect fruit from deterioration. DO NOT EAT.* Use metal cans as cookie cutters. Remove both ends to avoid creating a vacuum. Tomato paste cans are good for smaller cookies like peanut butter; vegetable cans are the right size for sugar cookies.* Make holiday evergreen or floral arrangements. Work in front of a mirror for symmetrical balance. A piece of plastic foam can hold the stems in place.
FEATURES
By Yolanda Garfield | November 4, 1990
Every successful host and hostess knows that when it come to dining, stimulating the imagination is every bit as important as stimulating the appetite. Food needs to look great as well as taste great. One way to do this is to set the stage for the occasion.Whether formal, informal or buffet, any table looks best when set with flair. Interior designer and well-known host Richard Taylor of Taylor/Siegmeister Associates enjoys planning fireside buffets for friends. For this evening after the theater, a window with a view of the city becomes the backdrop for an informally set buffet board.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | December 25, 1996
AFTER CHRISTMAS dinner, my grandmother sings Lithuanian folk songs. The adults, meanwhile, sip ''virytos,'' an amber-colored Lithuanian beverage. One literally sips virytos since in addition to honey, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and nutmeg, virytos contains 190-proof grain alcohol. My grandmother's hands rest lightly on the table; a small glass of virytos is beside them.Her voice is plaintive. The look on her face reminds me of sunlight coming through the living-room window. Her songs tell of ''Lietuva,'' Lithuania, a country on the Baltic sea between Poland, Latvia and Russia.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 19, 2005
You've agreed -- or been elected -- to host Thanksgiving dinner. Now it's only days away and you realize you might not have everything you need. Don't panic: Setting a fine holiday table doesn't have to break the bank. With a little creative thinking, even the most ill-equipped hosts can work with what they have, fill in gaps with low-cost options, and end up with a table they can be proud of. The table: Instead of crowding a too-small table with food for family-style dining, set up a buffet.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 19, 2005
You've agreed -- or been elected -- to host Thanksgiving dinner. Now it's only days away and you realize you might not have everything you need. Don't panic: Setting a fine holiday table doesn't have to break the bank. With a little creative thinking, even the most ill-equipped hosts can work with what they have, fill in gaps with low-cost options, and end up with a table they can be proud of. The table: Instead of crowding a too-small table with food for family-style dining, set up a buffet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2005
This ain't the Ropewalk of your blurry late-night revelries in Federal Hill. The Bel Air Ropewalk, which opened in February, might be considered the overachieving younger sibling to Federal Hill's fun-times frat boy. Both Ropewalks are owned by brothers Marc and Bill McFaul, but the Bel Air Ropewalk is larger, less smoky, and has a much better menu. It even has white tablecloths. The space, according to manager and brother-in-law Matt Saunders, can hold 400 patrons if they are standing with a drink in hand, or about 85 if they are sitting down for a meal.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Roland Jeannier has hung up his saucepan. The 73-year-old French chef is retiring and has sold Jeannier's, his 100-seat white-tablecloth restaurant known for classic fare, velvety sauces and luscious desserts. Its closing marks the end of what was one of the bastions of French food in Baltimore for the past 20 years. Jeannier's was beloved by many for some of the same reasons that others were put off by it -- a fixed menu and a formal sensibility at a time when much of the restaurant industry was moving toward a lighter, more casual style of dining.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | November 27, 1999
LAST SATURDAY morning I was sitting on a curb, chatting with a friend, at the corner of Barclay and 32nd. I looked up, and there was my father, looking sharp in an emerald green sweater, in search of good baking potatoes at the Waverly Farmers Market.When Thanksgiving week rolls around, it's time to stock the larder with the fall harvest, just one of the gentle rules that govern family holiday observance.Like any good family tradition, these precepts govern the way we behave throughout this weekend.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | May 23, 1999
Recipe for a perfect picnic: Start with a glorious day -- blue sky, maybe a few puffy clouds, not too hot, not too cold, preferably with a gentle breeze. Add charming companionship, friends or family. Season with some of your favorite foods. Relax and enjoy.Of course, it's not that easy to whip up an ideal outdoor dining experience. It takes organization and labor beforehand. To help you execute a perfect picnic, we talked to food and organization experts, and checked out local sources for equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 11, 1999
Lynn Patrick, who made a name for himself around here as a manager and part owner of the Milton Inn and then restaurant manager of Hamilton's in the Admiral Fell Inn, has a new restaurant in the works. He and his associates will be opening what he calls "a bistro with white tablecloth capability" in the late summer or early fall.The partners have a location (in the Carlyle Apartments at 500 W. University Parkway where the Dragon Palace used to be), an architect for the renovation (Rebecca Swanston)
TRAVEL
February 28, 1999
MY BEST SHOTA 'tablecloth' on a mountainBy Claire Smith, BaltimoreTable Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, is one of the most photographed natural objects in South Africa. While preparing for my trip, I had read about the "tablecloth" that hovers over Table Mountain. On my last morning in Cape Town, I awoke to this view. The clouds draped over the top of the mountain, just like a "tablecloth." A view of the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront adds to the scenery.MY FAVORITE PLACEA giant among parrotfishMary Jane MitchellSpecial to the SunHovering over a forest of elkhorn coral, watching the interplay of shadows and sunlight, and the choreographed movements of a large school of blue tangs, I suddenly spotted the largest midnight parrotfish I had ever seen.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 4, 1992
New York -- In the grand and glorious Matisse show at the Museum of Modern Art, many works are more famous than the painting "Still Life with Blue Tablecloth" of 1909, but there may well be none that better exemplifies the artist's stance with respect to his time.It is a painting of a bowl of fruit, a coffee pot and a small carafeon a tablecloth covered with a large-scale swirling decorative pattern that serves as the principal subject of almost all of the picture.Because the tablecloth descends from the top of the picture behind the objects, and they also sit on it, we have some sense that it fulfills both a vertical and a horizontal function.
TRAVEL
February 28, 1999
MY BEST SHOTA 'tablecloth' on a mountainBy Claire Smith, BaltimoreTable Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, is one of the most photographed natural objects in South Africa. While preparing for my trip, I had read about the "tablecloth" that hovers over Table Mountain. On my last morning in Cape Town, I awoke to this view. The clouds draped over the top of the mountain, just like a "tablecloth." A view of the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront adds to the scenery.MY FAVORITE PLACEA giant among parrotfishMary Jane MitchellSpecial to the SunHovering over a forest of elkhorn coral, watching the interplay of shadows and sunlight, and the choreographed movements of a large school of blue tangs, I suddenly spotted the largest midnight parrotfish I had ever seen.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
At T. G. I. Friday's in White Marsh, it's hard to miss the perky, red-and white-clad servers breaking into rounds of "Happy Birthday" or the crew racing boat hanging from the wall.But most people probably never notice the way the spotlights cast a glow toward the bar or the precise direction of the tablecloth stripes. That's Gretchen Tolmer's department.As she drives into the parking lot in the morning, the manager's eyes automatically sweep the property, checking the health of the pansies, the cleanliness of the awnings and looking for litter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.