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Tabasco Sauce

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By ROB KASPER | February 7, 1993
It has made soldiers weep for joy. It has made other folks just plain cry. Its zealots claim it can bring life to seafood, zest to beef, and personality to scrambled eggs. The not-so-swept away simply complain that it burns their lips. Everyone agrees that it opens sinuses.It is Tabasco sauce, the fiery stuff made from red capsicum peppers by the McIlhenny family of Avery Island, La. This year the sauce is 125 years old. And to mark the occasion, Paul McIlhenny and Barbara Hunter have written "The Tabasco Cookbook" (Clarkson Potter, $14)
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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | April 19, 2012
Pat's Pizzeria has made its mark on Harford Countywith its sought after slices and its family-friendly atmosphere. Originally the brainchild of three cousins from New Jersey, Tony, John and Joe, the franchise grew to over 50 locations in New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. And today, every Pat's franchise is owned by a relative of the founding cousins. So in the spirit of keeping it all in the family, nephews of the founding partners, Christos and his brother, Stathis Kotanidis, own the Havre de Grace, Bel Air, and Edgewood locations of Pat's Pizzeria.
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NEWS
April 24, 1995
PICKY eaters make life difficult. Everything put before them must be prepared a certain way, with certain ingredients, or else.That "or else" depends on the eater in question.Children may simply refuse to eat or they may throw themselves kicking and screaming onto the floor. Adults are seldom as physical in their disappointment, but they can be just as vocal.The worst nightmare a restaurant cook can face is picky eaters. They complain, send their food back, and refuse to pay their bills.In New Hampshire, they have the cook jailed.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
It's supposedly good for you to eat pork or cabbage or black-eyed peas at New Year's, and for my last post of the year I offer you this recipe for “caviar” made with black-eyed peas. It's a variant of a recipe for the 1970s in a Time-Life book that The Sun published in 2000. It has been quite serviceable for the holiday in our house. Here are a couple of things to consider. Dried black-eyed peas are better than canned, because you can have more control over whether they get mushy.
FEATURES
By From "Cuisine Rapide", by Pierre Franey & Bryan Miller, Times Books | November 6, 1991
1 1/4 pounds skinless, boneless salmon1 1/4 cups fine fresh bread crumbsSalt and freshly ground pepper to taste1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg1/4 teaspoon ground cumin1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce1/3 cup milk1/3 cup sour cream1/4 cup chopped fresh coriander1 tablespoon corn or vegetable oil4 tablespoons butter1 tablespoon lemon juiceChop the salmon coarsely with a very heavy sharp knife or with a food processorPlace salmon in a mixing bowl and add 1/2...
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
Along with goggles and gas masks, U.S. soldiers in Iraq are carrying another item into battle - mini bottles of Tabasco sauce, packed in their food rations. The fiery pepper sauce, produced since 1868 by the McIlhenny Co. on Avery Island in Louisiana, has spiced up military meals for more than a century. "One of my distant cousins sent a case of Tabasco to Ulysses S. Grant when he was president," says Paul McIlhenny, company president. That still counts, because Grant was a Civil War general, he says.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
It's supposedly good for you to eat pork or cabbage or black-eyed peas at New Year's, and for my last post of the year I offer you this recipe for “caviar” made with black-eyed peas. It's a variant of a recipe for the 1970s in a Time-Life book that The Sun published in 2000. It has been quite serviceable for the holiday in our house. Here are a couple of things to consider. Dried black-eyed peas are better than canned, because you can have more control over whether they get mushy.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | April 19, 2012
Pat's Pizzeria has made its mark on Harford Countywith its sought after slices and its family-friendly atmosphere. Originally the brainchild of three cousins from New Jersey, Tony, John and Joe, the franchise grew to over 50 locations in New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. And today, every Pat's franchise is owned by a relative of the founding cousins. So in the spirit of keeping it all in the family, nephews of the founding partners, Christos and his brother, Stathis Kotanidis, own the Havre de Grace, Bel Air, and Edgewood locations of Pat's Pizzeria.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | November 14, 1992
Around the house* Keep kitty out of trouble. Leave open containers of strong-smelling liquids -- such as diluted white vinegar, lemon juice and Tabasco sauce -- in areas that you don't want your cat to inhabit. The odors will discourage cats from off-limits places.* Brighten soiled canvas tennis shoes. Brush shoes clean with toothpaste and an old toothbrush; rinse in a bucket of clear water, and let dry in the sun or the dryer.* Keep a pair of kitchen shears handy. They can be used to cut up chicken, slice pizza, snip fresh herbs or mince meat for toddlers.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | November 6, 1993
Around the house* Spray freshly polished brass accessories with extra-hold hair spray. This will prolong shine and can be washed off easily with soap and water when items need repolishing.* Fluff and soften air-dried clothes. Set dryer on "air" setting and spin with a fabric softener sheet for about five minutes.* Soak heavily soiled oven racks in tub with hot water. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of automatic dishwasher detergent over rack. Let sit until grease spots dissolve.* Pour 1 cup baking soda into sink drain to avoid clogging.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2005
Clarification An article in the Dec. 28 issue of Taste featuring the best recipes of 2005 listed Stay-a-bed Stew as one that had appeared in Recipe Finder. The recipe is from The I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken. Throughout the year we try to bring our readers a wide variety of recipe and food ideas. As 2005 comes to an end, we take a look back through these pages to find our 12 favorite recipes of the year. The recipes we have selected made the cut for a variety of reasons. Perhaps it's the news that the slow cooker has had a rebirth or that a local chef has a new twist on chowder that highlights the bounty of the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 1, 2003
One of Ellicott City's most intriguing restaurants is located on the edge of a busy highway among the strip malls, not in the historic district where it belongs, given its cozy rusticity. The place now known as the Blue Pointe Grille, formerly Hunter's Lodge, has been in its past a shrine to New American cuisine, a Greek-American restaurant, a more casual neighborhood place and a seafood spot -- all under the same owners. Sometimes at the same time. You never know what to expect. Now Damon Hersh, who made a name for himself locally when he helped open Louisiana in Fells Point, has taken over the kitchen.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2003
There are many opening seasons in our country. The first ball pitched in early spring grabs the attention of baseball fans ready to root once again for their favorite team. In late fall, music lovers anxiously await the first note of the weekly Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts. And for food lovers -- especially those who live where winters are long -- Memorial Day opens the season of backyard cooking and initiates the slow, easy days of summer entertaining. On the long Memorial Day weekend, millions pull out their grills, tongs and potholders and move their kitchens outdoors.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
Along with goggles and gas masks, U.S. soldiers in Iraq are carrying another item into battle - mini bottles of Tabasco sauce, packed in their food rations. The fiery pepper sauce, produced since 1868 by the McIlhenny Co. on Avery Island in Louisiana, has spiced up military meals for more than a century. "One of my distant cousins sent a case of Tabasco to Ulysses S. Grant when he was president," says Paul McIlhenny, company president. That still counts, because Grant was a Civil War general, he says.
FEATURES
April 1, 1996
Harvard professor admires 'Aphrodite' for her brainsMira, Mira, in Harvard halls . . . who's the fairest among the ivy-covered walls?Mira Sorvino, who won the best supporting actress Oscar last week for her role in "Mighty Aphrodite," may be, says a professor at her alma mater in Cambridge, Mass.Her thesis on race relations between Chinese and African exchange students was extraordinary, professor Peter Bol, a specialist in Chinese history, told the New York Daily News."It was regarded as publishable," he said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 30, 1995
AVERY ISLAND, La. -- The McIlhenny Co. likes to keep its peppers hot, its sauces fiery and its profits in the family.Thanks to a happy marriage of history and geography, McIlhenny is the sole maker of a hot pepper-based concoction finding a growing number of devotees around the globe.It's called Tabasco, which isn't a generic name but a trademarked McIlhenny brand. And the 127-year-old family-owned company is doing its best to keep sales growing, with a variety of recent spin-off products as well as a venture with H. J. Heinz Co. that puts Tabasco in Heinz ketchup.
FEATURES
April 1, 1996
Harvard professor admires 'Aphrodite' for her brainsMira, Mira, in Harvard halls . . . who's the fairest among the ivy-covered walls?Mira Sorvino, who won the best supporting actress Oscar last week for her role in "Mighty Aphrodite," may be, says a professor at her alma mater in Cambridge, Mass.Her thesis on race relations between Chinese and African exchange students was extraordinary, professor Peter Bol, a specialist in Chinese history, told the New York Daily News."It was regarded as publishable," he said.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2003
There are many opening seasons in our country. The first ball pitched in early spring grabs the attention of baseball fans ready to root once again for their favorite team. In late fall, music lovers anxiously await the first note of the weekly Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts. And for food lovers -- especially those who live where winters are long -- Memorial Day opens the season of backyard cooking and initiates the slow, easy days of summer entertaining. On the long Memorial Day weekend, millions pull out their grills, tongs and potholders and move their kitchens outdoors.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
PICKY eaters make life difficult. Everything put before them must be prepared a certain way, with certain ingredients, or else.That "or else" depends on the eater in question.Children may simply refuse to eat or they may throw themselves kicking and screaming onto the floor. Adults are seldom as physical in their disappointment, but they can be just as vocal.The worst nightmare a restaurant cook can face is picky eaters. They complain, send their food back, and refuse to pay their bills.In New Hampshire, they have the cook jailed.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | November 6, 1993
Around the house* Spray freshly polished brass accessories with extra-hold hair spray. This will prolong shine and can be washed off easily with soap and water when items need repolishing.* Fluff and soften air-dried clothes. Set dryer on "air" setting and spin with a fabric softener sheet for about five minutes.* Soak heavily soiled oven racks in tub with hot water. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of automatic dishwasher detergent over rack. Let sit until grease spots dissolve.* Pour 1 cup baking soda into sink drain to avoid clogging.
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