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By Ta-Nehisi Coates | October 15, 2012
Let me tell you about the worst thing I ever did to my son. When he was 4, I took him to a small basement apartment in a Manhattanbrownstone. I then paid a man to give my son an intelligence test. The test was an attempt to deliver my son from the chaos of "normal" public school in my adopted hometown of Harlem into a gifted-and-talented program on the tony Upper West Side. My son performed pretty abominably. This did not shake me, as I was not very confident in how well I would have done had I been confronted at age 4 with an "intelligence test.
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NEWS
By Betsey Swingle Hobelmann, Kimberly R. Moffitt and Jack J. Pannell Jr | May 2, 2014
Some of the most esteemed Baltimoreans attended or graduated from Baltimore City high schools: Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and U.S. Congressman Parren Mitchell (Douglass), Wall Street financier Reginald Lewis (Dunbar), and writer Ta-Nehisi Coates (Poly). These revered men remind us of a yesteryear when black males, in particular, had opportunities to thrive and succeed while attending city schools. But that Baltimore of old is very different from the one many black males experience today.
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NEWS
By Betsey Swingle Hobelmann, Kimberly R. Moffitt and Jack J. Pannell Jr | May 2, 2014
Some of the most esteemed Baltimoreans attended or graduated from Baltimore City high schools: Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and U.S. Congressman Parren Mitchell (Douglass), Wall Street financier Reginald Lewis (Dunbar), and writer Ta-Nehisi Coates (Poly). These revered men remind us of a yesteryear when black males, in particular, had opportunities to thrive and succeed while attending city schools. But that Baltimore of old is very different from the one many black males experience today.
FEATURES
By Tanika Davis, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Last week, my husband and I read a New York Times commentary by one of our favorite columnists, Ta-Nehisi Coates, called "The Good, Racist People. " Coates' take on a racially tinged event involving a famous black actor and an upscale Manhattan eatery sparked lots of healthy debate at our dinner table and before we drifted off to sleep. My husband thought Coates was overreacting to this particular incident. I agreed. I've been trying to offer up more forgiveness than fury when it comes to small slights or race-related injuries, because I know that people have a lot of baggage around race and class that is tremendously difficult to overcome -- even for really well-meaning people.
FEATURES
By Tanika Davis, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Last week, my husband and I read a New York Times commentary by one of our favorite columnists, Ta-Nehisi Coates, called "The Good, Racist People. " Coates' take on a racially tinged event involving a famous black actor and an upscale Manhattan eatery sparked lots of healthy debate at our dinner table and before we drifted off to sleep. My husband thought Coates was overreacting to this particular incident. I agreed. I've been trying to offer up more forgiveness than fury when it comes to small slights or race-related injuries, because I know that people have a lot of baggage around race and class that is tremendously difficult to overcome -- even for really well-meaning people.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Talk-show host Marc Steiner, whose forced exit from WYPR-FM set off a firestorm of protest and left his fans calling for the removal of station management, will resurface next week with a weekly morning show on WEAA-FM. The new hourlong Marc Steiner Show will air at 9 a.m. Wednesdays on WEAA (88.9), which broadcasts from the campus of Morgan State University. Plans call for the show to air daily beginning in the fall, possibly as early as September, Steiner said. "We're very excited," said the radio host, whose show will be produced by his own Center for Emerging Media.
NEWS
By Ta-Nehisi Coates | January 22, 2013
Last Sunday, "Girls," HBO's much-talked-about comedy, debuted its second season. I should qualify that "much-talked-about" description, since "Girls" is really only a major discussion point among young liberal urbanites around the country. It's in matters like "the debate about 'Girls'" that one can speak of latte-sipping liberals and the coastal elite. As a latte-sipping liberal in good standing but a coastal elite in training, I caught up on the show a year late and spent the past week watching the show's first season while most of my peers were enjoying the start of its second.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 14, 2008
It's a safe bet Ta-Nehisi Coates' father no longer thinks he's "a disgrace to the family name." But 16 years ago, that's exactly what Paul Coates told his fourth-oldest son. At the time, Ta-Nehisi was a junior at Polytechnic Institute. It was near the end of the school year. Ta-Nehisi struggled at the elite Baltimore school his first two years there, failing three courses when he was a freshman and three more when he was a sophomore. Ta-Nehisi was given a reprieve - you know, the kind that Baltimore schools Chief Executive Officer Andres Alonso thinks schools like Poly and City College and Western aren't giving to failing students - and allowed to return.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | October 4, 2012
If you haven't done so already, you should stop right now and read a piece by another young journalist from Baltimore, “Fear of a Black President,” the September cover story by The Atlantic's Ta-Nehisi Coates. I'm serious. It's really good. Here's a paragraph break so that you know where to pick this up. Welcome back. Now as you'll recall, Mr. Coates points out the irony of America's first black president barely mentioning the subject of race at all. It's certainly an issue for other people.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer Staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | July 26, 1993
In the air above Mount Royal Avenue, the horn choruses of Zim Zemarel's big band mixed with the thumping bass line of reggae from Zebulon and the Fullness, and the scent of soft-shell crabs met the tang of Cajun chicken.The pungent cultural stew called ArtScape was served up to urbanites and suburbanites by the thousands yesterday, on a muggy day that was pure Baltimore summer.For Pete Dean, 64, a city roads worker in a blue baseball cap leaning on a stone wall to listen to the Zemarel band, it was a first ArtScape.
NEWS
By Ta-Nehisi Coates | October 15, 2012
Let me tell you about the worst thing I ever did to my son. When he was 4, I took him to a small basement apartment in a Manhattanbrownstone. I then paid a man to give my son an intelligence test. The test was an attempt to deliver my son from the chaos of "normal" public school in my adopted hometown of Harlem into a gifted-and-talented program on the tony Upper West Side. My son performed pretty abominably. This did not shake me, as I was not very confident in how well I would have done had I been confronted at age 4 with an "intelligence test.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | June 22, 2014
It's not as messy as the rollout of President Barack Obama's health care plan, but his My Brother's Keeper initiative for black and Latino boys and young men has created a firestorm of debate among people who have largely been supportive of his presidency. But why should we have expected anything less from a bold, if not perfectly targeted, effort to address the fact that, as he noted, "the group that is facing some of the most severe challenges in the 21st century are boys and young men of color"?
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