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NEWS
December 9, 1991
Westinghouse's Electronic Systems Group has introduced an unprecedented information system that could help companies with large shipping operations save millions of dollars while improving their ability to satisfy customers through high-quality transportation services.The new system, called Westinghouse Sure Shipping, was developed by a Westinghouse subsidiary in Richmond.Sure Shipping allows shippers of manufactured and processed goodsto optimize their use of commercial carriers.
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EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | January 29, 2012
The first step is always the hardest, they say, but those attending a meeting last week regarding future biking and hiking trails in Eldersburg and Sykesville said they are willing to take that first step - and many more - to realize the goal of a trail system in the Freedom area. Led by Jeff Degitz, director of Carroll County's Department of Recreation and Parks, the Jan. 19 meeting offered residents a chance to share ideas for future trails - and also for the county's goals regarding pedestrian and bike access.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | March 15, 1991
Westinghouse Electric Corp. has broken ground for two office buildings in northern Anne Arundel County, one of which is serve as the new corporate headquarters of its Electronic Systems Group.The Pittsburgh-based conglomerate announced plans last spring for the development of a 30-acre tract near Nursery and Winterson roads, adjacent to its Advanced Technologies Laboratories in Linthicum, but decided recently to shift the headquarters of its Electronic Systems Group (ESG) into the facilities, a Westinghouse spokesman, Jack Martin, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | November 19, 2006
Some Westminster residents are still voicing opposition to the proposed $74 million Carroll County Regional Airport runway expansion, as county officials move closer to completing a draft of the airport master plan by Dec. 31. To assuage concerns about safety, the commissioners last week approved a federal Department of Homeland Security grant to purchase a 24-hour airport security management system. The security cameras should be installed by February, said Joseph Varrone, the county's performance auditing administrator.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
Edward N. Silcott, who was picked 3 1/2 years ago to reduce the local Westinghouse division's dependence on a shrinking defense budget, is leaving the Electronic Systems Group.In an employee bulletin, Richard A. Linder, president of the Linthicum-based division, said Mr. Silcott was leaving to pursue other business and personal interests. He could not be reached for comment yesterday.Mr. Silcott has spent his entire career with Westinghouse, joining the company's local defense arm in 1960 as an assembly shop worker while attending night classes at the University of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1990
Despite Defense Department cutbacks and a faltering economy, the head of Westinghouse Corp. says, Westinghouse is in a better position than ever."I don't believe I could have come to the job at a more opportune time," said chairman and chief executive Paul E. Lego, who was named head of the company in July. Lego was in Baltimore yesterday to address a national symposium on Total Quality Management.TQM is a management strategy that suggests all employees turn out the quality of work that they would like to receive.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | January 11, 1991
The Pentagon's decision to cancel the Navy's A-12 Stealth program could cost 1,200 workers their jobs at the Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum.Richard A. Linder, president of the Electronic Systems Group, sent a letter to employees yesterday saying the prime contractors on the project have ordered Westinghouse to stop work on radar and infared systems for the A-12 fighter plane."We are currently assessing the impact on the Electronic Systems Group of the stop-work order," Linder said.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | July 9, 1991
A Maryland unit of Westinghouse Electric Corp. failed to win a $840 million contract for which it had been considered the front-runner, but a spokesman said the company plans no layoffs as a result.The Air Force last week selected Hughes Aircraft Co. of Fullerton, Calif., to complete work on an air defense system for Saudi Arabia.The Boeing Co. of Seattle had been working on a contract to produce the system, dubbed the Peace Shield. But the Air Force, alleging poor performance by the contractor, canceled the deal and last year withheld $240 million in payments.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
As the people at the local Westinghouse division see it, there's not a big difference in keeping track of tanks on the battlefield and MTA buses making their way around the city.Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum has announced the sale to Milwaukee County, for $8.4 million, of a newmass transit vehicle management system that taps into the technology used in the Persian Gulf war last year.The system includes a communication network that, using a global positioning satellite, allows a dispatcher to determine the location, to within about 50 yards, of all buses in his system at all times.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Westinghouse Electric Corp. announced yesterday that it narrowed its fourth-quarter loss and posted a profit for the year, the result of cost-cutting measures and gains in virtually all segments, including its Linthicum-based Electronic Systems Group.The Pittsburgh-based conglomerate, one of Maryland's largest private employers with roughly 10,500 workers, reported net income for the year of $77 million, 7 cents per share, on revenues of $8.84 billion.Those figures reversed a loss of $32 million, $1.07 per share, on revenues of $8.87 billion for the year ended Dec. 31, 1993.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
An advocacy group has issued a report charging that state government has its priorities backward when it comes to juvenile justice, with far too few resources to prevent youth crime before it becomes serious.The report, released yesterday by Advocates for Children and Youth, also states that more Maryland youngsters are being charged as adults, but that many of them are not the repeat offenders politicians envisioned when they passed legislation in 1994 to crack down on young criminals.To avert a projected increase in juvenile crime statewide and around the country, officials must shift resources extensively to intervene in children's lives before they are in serious trouble, the report says.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Westinghouse Electric Corp. announced yesterday that it narrowed its fourth-quarter loss and posted a profit for the year, the result of cost-cutting measures and gains in virtually all segments, including its Linthicum-based Electronic Systems Group.The Pittsburgh-based conglomerate, one of Maryland's largest private employers with roughly 10,500 workers, reported net income for the year of $77 million, 7 cents per share, on revenues of $8.84 billion.Those figures reversed a loss of $32 million, $1.07 per share, on revenues of $8.87 billion for the year ended Dec. 31, 1993.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
After years of suffering layoffs and contraction, the local defense arm of Westinghouse Electric Corp. was given a new reason yesterday to be nervous about the future of jobs.With its announcement that it would eliminate 6,000 jobs, 3,400 through layoffs, over the next two years, the Pittsburgh-based conglomerate offered little additional information to ease the anxiety of its people at the Linthicum-based Electronic Systems Group. After a similar call for work-force reduction in October 1991, 1,300 Electronic Systems workers were laid off."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
Edward N. Silcott, who was picked 3 1/2 years ago to reduce the local Westinghouse division's dependence on a shrinking defense budget, is leaving the Electronic Systems Group.In an employee bulletin, Richard A. Linder, president of the Linthicum-based division, said Mr. Silcott was leaving to pursue other business and personal interests. He could not be reached for comment yesterday.Mr. Silcott has spent his entire career with Westinghouse, joining the company's local defense arm in 1960 as an assembly shop worker while attending night classes at the University of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Dividend checks and unemployment checks -- there are no better symbols of the polarized performance of Maryland companies in the quarter that ended in September.The state's banks and thrifts glowed, as their health continued to improve, and securities firms reported record profits. Some financial services companies even managed to increase dividend payments that had been cut years earlier, when the recession began to take hold.Meanwhile, layoffs hit or threatened workers in many other companies, from Giant Food, Esskay and the A&P bakery in West Baltimore, to General Motors Corp.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer Staff Writers Kim Clark and Andrea Siegel contributed to this article | October 17, 1992
Westinghouse Electric Corp. said yesterday that it would lay off 1,400 workers in Maryland by the end of the year.The layoffs affect one out of every nine jobs that Westinghouse, the state's largest manufacturing employer, has at its sprawling complex next to the Baltimore-Washington International Airport and in Hunt Valley.Word of the new cuts -- Westinghouse's third major work-force reduction in the state since February 1991 -- came on the heels of the company's recent loss of a big ground-based radar contract to Raytheon Corp.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
After years of suffering layoffs and contraction, the local defense arm of Westinghouse Electric Corp. was given a new reason yesterday to be nervous about the future of jobs.With its announcement that it would eliminate 6,000 jobs, 3,400 through layoffs, over the next two years, the Pittsburgh-based conglomerate offered little additional information to ease the anxiety of its people at the Linthicum-based Electronic Systems Group. After a similar call for work-force reduction in October 1991, 1,300 Electronic Systems workers were laid off."
NEWS
By Joel McCordand Ted Shelsby | February 2, 1991
War or no war, more than 1,200 local Westinghouse workers got word yesterday that they were losing their jobs as the result of a recent Pentagon decision to cancel the Navy's A-12 attack-aircraft program.The Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group was under contract to supply the main radar units and an infrared system for the A-12, a replacement for the vintage A-6 Intruders that are making bombing runs on targets in Iraq and Kuwait.Combined with 200 layoffs at the Amecom division of Litton Systems Inc. in College Park, the state has lost more than 1,400 jobs as a result of the A-12's demise.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
As the people at the local Westinghouse division see it, there's not a big difference in keeping track of tanks on the battlefield and MTA buses making their way around the city.Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum has announced the sale to Milwaukee County, for $8.4 million, of a newmass transit vehicle management system that taps into the technology used in the Persian Gulf war last year.The system includes a communication network that, using a global positioning satellite, allows a dispatcher to determine the location, to within about 50 yards, of all buses in his system at all times.
NEWS
December 9, 1991
Westinghouse's Electronic Systems Group has introduced an unprecedented information system that could help companies with large shipping operations save millions of dollars while improving their ability to satisfy customers through high-quality transportation services.The new system, called Westinghouse Sure Shipping, was developed by a Westinghouse subsidiary in Richmond.Sure Shipping allows shippers of manufactured and processed goodsto optimize their use of commercial carriers.
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