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By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
For a few hours each day -- and especially on Saturdays -- Wyatt Middleton's beautiful mind is at rest. Or, perhaps to put it more accurately, at peace. This does not occur when he's sleeping, or daydreaming. It does not happen in front of a television, or with a book in his hand. Instead, this tranquility of the brain takes place on a football field. There, the world is simplified into straight lines and sharp angles. There is no quantitative analysis, robotics engineering or applied physics.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
By midmorning Tuesday, Naval Academy Midshipman Kevin Saxton had been awake for eight hours, tackled an obstacle course, survived an endurance run and beat his classmates with pugil sticks. Sweat dripping down his face as he scarfed down trail mix, Saxton said his day at the annual academy Sea Trials was already a success - a sweaty, sandy, muddy good time with his band of classmates in Annapolis. "It's a lot of fun. Pretty physically challenging," said Saxton, a systems engineering major from Grand Rapids, Mich., who aspires to be a Marine Corps pilot.
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BUSINESS
March 16, 1992
New positionsBooz-Allen & Hamilton, an international management and technology consulting company with an office in Linthicum, appointed Robert G. Pozgar vice president and manager of the systems engineering and integration assignments for defense and national security clients.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Joseph Emmett Queen Jr., who spent three decades as a systems engineer for Westinghouse and its successor company, Northrop Grumman, died of unknown causes Sept. 12 at his home in Riva. He was 57. A Baltimore native, Mr. Queen grew up in and around the Guilford and Roland Park neighborhoods. He attended the Cathedral School, Loyola High School and Loyola College (now Loyola University Maryland). He received his master's degree in computer science from the Johns Hopkins University in 1983.
NEWS
June 14, 1995
The Anne Arundel Community College board of trustees voted unanimously last night to cut four academic programs from the curriculum.Effective this fall, students will not be allowed to sign up for manufacturing, engineering, and systems engineering degree programs. The systems engineering certificate program was also cut from the school. Students already in those four programs will be permitted to complete them.College officials said they decided to target the four programs that were eliminated because they were among the most expensive per student and have had low enrollment in recent years.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1990
A Columbia defense contracting firm has been fined $123,785 for repeatedly mischarging on secret Defense Department contracts in an effort to avoid losses from cost overruns.Systems Engineering and Development Co., of the 9100 block of Rumsey Road, pleaded guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to a felony count of filing a false claim for $11,783 on a contract with the National Security Agency at Fort Meade.The claim was one of 26 separate instances of defense contract mischarging by the company listed in a government statement of facts that was filed in court.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
AlliedSignal team awarded contractA team led by AlliedSignal Technical Services Corp. in Columbia has been awarded a $31.6 million contract to develop and install the ground system for Taiwan's satellite program.AlliedSignal will provide project management and systems engineering as well as the transfer of software engineering technology to Taiwan.The ATSC team in the United States includes Global Science and Technology of Greenbelt, Integral Systems of Lanham and TeleSystems International of Gaithersburg.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1997
Rockville-based Tracor Systems Engineering said yesterday that it won a five-year, $34.5 million contract for support services at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Dahlgren, Va.The contract calls for Tracor employees to provide technical and engineering services for Navy programs that include launchers and missiles.`The Navy has recognized us as a leading source for quality engineering services since 1986,` said Barry G. Campbell, chairman and chief executive officer of Tracor.`The size and scope of this contract will afford us the opportunity to enhance the overall capabilities of our Dahlgren office and to strengthen the capabilities of the Naval Surface Warfare Center.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
Alexander Kossiakoff, a chemist who devised ways to power early naval guided missiles and was later director of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of heart disease Saturday at Montgomery General Hospital. The Brookeville resident was 91. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he emigrated in 1923 with his family to Seattle, and earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. He moved to Baltimore in the mid-1930s and received a doctorate from the Johns Hopkins University in 1938.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1997
The Navy has renewed its 25-year relationship with Tracor Inc. at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station, awarding a contract extension worth up to $27.2 million for air traffic control support, the company said yesterday.Under the new contract, Tracor's Systems Engineering group will continue its role at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division for another five years.The company is based in Texas but has about 45 employees at Patuxent River, all working on a variety of air traffic control radars and landing systems used by Navy aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
For a few hours each day -- and especially on Saturdays -- Wyatt Middleton's beautiful mind is at rest. Or, perhaps to put it more accurately, at peace. This does not occur when he's sleeping, or daydreaming. It does not happen in front of a television, or with a book in his hand. Instead, this tranquility of the brain takes place on a football field. There, the world is simplified into straight lines and sharp angles. There is no quantitative analysis, robotics engineering or applied physics.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 20, 2010
Gordon H. Spittel, a retired Bell System telecommunications engineer and model rail enthusiast, died Feb. 10 of cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. He was 93. Mr. Spittel, the son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad accountant and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Halethorpe. He was a 1933 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Spittel went to work for Western Electric Corp. in 1937 and later took a job with Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. During World War II, he served in naval telecommunications in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun staff | May 2, 2007
Burton Lloyd Cordry, a retired health systems engineer who had recently completed a World War II memoir about his days as an Army staff sergeant, died of heart failure Friday at his Glen Arm home. He was 83. Mr. Cordry was born and raised in Hannibal, Mo., where in his youth he enjoyed guiding visitors to sites associated with Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, family members said. Mr.
NEWS
May 3, 2006
It's easy to label a manager as weak or underperforming. Measuring the cost of a given person's neglect, however, can be nearly impossible. Now, two industrial engineers from the University of Buffalo think they might have formulated a method to quantify "managerial neglect." Alfred Guiffrida, an adjunct instructor of industrial and systems engineering, and Rakesh Nagi, a professor of industrial and systems engineering, describe the method in the current issue of The Engineering Economist.
NEWS
September 27, 2005
Emory R. Kopf Jr., a systems engineer and former air traffic controller, died of complications from cancer Friday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The longtime Arnold resident was 69. Mr. Kopf was born in Annapolis and raised in the Manhattan Beach community of Severna Park. He was a 1954 graduate of Annapolis High School, and earned a certificate in 1957 from what is now Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla. Mr. Kopf served as an air traffic controller in the Air Force from 1957 to 1961, when he began his career at what was then Washington National Airport.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
Alexander Kossiakoff, a chemist who devised ways to power early naval guided missiles and was later director of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of heart disease Saturday at Montgomery General Hospital. The Brookeville resident was 91. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he emigrated in 1923 with his family to Seattle, and earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. He moved to Baltimore in the mid-1930s and received a doctorate from the Johns Hopkins University in 1938.
NEWS
May 6, 1993
Engineering games test skills of midshipmenTeams of senior midshipmen raced model cars around a track and designed vehicles to pop a Ping-Pong ball through a basket in games to test their engineering skills at the Naval Academy on Monday.Midshipmen designed and built the vehicles in the culmination of a semester's work in weapons and systems engineering.In the first competition, six teams tried to advance their vehicles up a ramp and shoot a Ping-Pong ball through a 2-inch-wide hoop. Midshipman 1st Class Rick Radonich of Los Gatos, Calif.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1995
The decision Tuesday by the Anne Arundel Community College board of directors to eliminate three engineering degree programs and one certificate program follows several years of enrollment decline and rising program costs.One college official said the drop in popularity of the four programs is part of a statewide trend that he can't explain."The decline is happening in engineering classes in community colleges across the state," said Dennis Galloway, the school's vice president of academic affairs.
NEWS
April 27, 2004
William Andrew Parker, a retired stationary engineer for the Anne Arundel County school system, died of cancer Wednesday at North Arundel Hospital. The Severna Park resident was 72. Born in Baltimore and raised on Bentalou Street, he was a 1950 Frederick Douglass High School graduate. Mr. Parker retired two years ago after working at several schools, including Chesapeake High and Chesapeake Bay Middle, and Bodkin and Meade Heights elementaries. He had earlier worked for Baltimore's public schools.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
William Alexander Barr, a retired mechanical engineer who taught at the Naval Academy and investigated auto safety issues, died Sunday of Pick's disease, a neurological condition, at Rosewood Village in Charlottesville, Va., where he had lived since August. He was 81, and also had homes on Gibson Island and in the Village of Cross Keys in North Baltimore. A professor of mechanical engineering at the service academy, he had been called as an expert witness in numerous industrial and automobile safety cases.
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