Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSystem Software
IN THE NEWS

System Software

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | April 13, 1992
When the major planets fall into alignment in the heavens, soothsayers prophesy upheaval and chaos.So beware the Ides of April. A similar portentous alignment is occurring this month in the personal computer industry as several major companies introduce new or improved operating system software.Operating system software is the foundation software upon which all other computer applications operate. It is, in an anthropomorphic sense, the soul or DNA of the machine.The most popular operating system is DOS, used by an estimated 70 million computers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 10, 2010
The nation's largest provider of voting equipment will unwind its acquisition last year of its principal rival as part of an antitrust settlement with Maryland and eight other states, the Department of Justice announced. Election Systems & Software completed its purchase of Premier Election Solutions Inc., formerly Diebold Inc., six days before bids were due for the installation of a new optical scan voting system in Maryland. The acquisition limited the state to contracting with the Omaha, Neb., giant or continuing with its current system, according to the office of Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lawrence J. Magid and Lawrence J. Magid,Los Angeles Times Syndicdate | May 20, 1991
Apple Computer's System 7, the long-awaited Macintosh operating system software introduced recently, makes the Mac more powerful and easier to use.The new system software, along with Apple's newly adopted aggressive pricing strategy, will help polish Apple's long-standing reputation as an innovator. System 7 provides access to more memory, streamlines the way you run programs and makes it possible for future Macintosh programs to exchange data and programming tasks with little or no help from you. It also makes it easier to install and use fonts.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
Micros Systems Inc., a fast-growing company that makes computer systems and software for the restaurant and hospitality industry, said yesterday that it plans to shift 650 employees and its world headquarters to Columbia from Beltsville.The company, which has 1,800 employees worldwide, said it signed an agreement with Orix Real Estate Equities Inc. of Chicago to lease a 250,000-square-foot office building that Orix will build for Micros. Construction of the new headquarters, which will be equipped with the latest communications devices, will cost an estimated $30 million.
BUSINESS
By Lawrence J. Magid | October 21, 1991
When IBM and Apple announced their historic pact in July, many PC users and analysts were skeptical. After the Oct. 2 announcement of the details, they still should be.Two former archrivals agreeing to share technology is one thing. Creating useful products is another. There is no question about the relationship itself. IBM and Apple have a lot riding on this agreement and it would be a major embarrassment if it were to dissolve.The marriage certainly makes sense from an image perspective.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Financial Service | July 1, 1991
Here are summaries of some recent computing product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:Intel 9600EX Modem. $799 for the PC version, $819 for the Macintosh version. From Intel Corp., 5200 N.E. Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, Ore. 97124. (800) 538-3373.9,600-bit-per-second modems have become the standard for business computing. (Recreational computer users can probably get by with a 2,400-bps modem, which costs only $150 or so.)
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | August 28, 1995
Windows 95, the system software upgrade that was finally released last week by Microsoft Corp., has a number of keen and spiffy new features that will delight anyone who has never used an Apple Macintosh.Once they install Windows 95 and spend hundreds of dollars replacing their existing applications with Windows-95-compliant versions, Microsoft's customers will be able to use long file names; organize files in nested folders; use a mouse to drag files from one window on screen to another; add peripherals without needing an electrical engineering degree, and so on.The Macintosh operating system has had all these impressive features since the mid-1980s.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | July 10, 1991
As profitability in the personal computer field has plummeted, there has been a growing realization at IBM that the money and growth in that business will increasingly be found principally at the very bottom of the computer business and at the very top.That means chips at the bottom and operating system software at the top."We want to be able to control our own destiny," said Jack D. Kuehler, IBM's president. "There are two fundamental forces and opportunities to be corralled in the PC marketplace: One is the incredible advances of semiconductor technology.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | March 9, 1992
Taligent Inc. officially opened for business last week with 170 experienced employees, two new leaders, the most impressive venture backing in Silicon Valley and one of the toughest challenges faced by any computer software company.Taligent is an independent joint venture of Apple Computer Inc. and the International Business Machines Corp., with a mandate to develop operating system software that will be the foundation for business computers in the mid-1990s and into the 21st century."We think the operating system we're developing is one that can recast the shape of the industry," said Joseph M. Guglielmi, a veteran IBM marketing executive who was named chairman and chief executive of Taligent Feb. 24, five months after Taligent was created.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | May 27, 1991
The Apple Macintosh has long been acknowledged as easier to use than the more widely sold IBM PCs and compatibles, and the key to that ease of use has been the computer's operating system software.Apple Computer Inc.'s improved version of the Macintosh operating system, called System 7.0, adds more power to the computer without increasing its complexity.The first thing a user will notice about System 7.0 is the subtle addition of 3-D effects and color shading on the "desktop," the area of the screen where work takes place.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
County Comptroller Eugene Curfman had two pieces of bad news for the County Commissioners yesterday when discussing his $1.6 million operating budget request for the coming fiscal year.The county soon may have to switch to a new bank that could charge higher rates to guarantee the county's investments, Curfman said.NationsBank, which guarantees the county's investments, "has put its trust division up for sale," Curfman said at yesterday's hearing on department budget requests for fiscal 1998, which begins July 1."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
For Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, life's defining moment came when, as a teen-ager, he started working a primitive computer at the private school he attended.For Baltimore native Frank Moss, another fortyish computer tycoon, youthful inspiration spoke with a different voice. It had bad legs, frequented Memorial Stadium and wore a blue and white jersey with No. 19."Johnny Unitas was a role model for us all," remembers Mr. Moss. "One of the formative events was the championship game of '58, when the Colts and Unitas came from behind to go into overtime and beat the Giants.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | August 28, 1995
Windows 95, the system software upgrade that was finally released last week by Microsoft Corp., has a number of keen and spiffy new features that will delight anyone who has never used an Apple Macintosh.Once they install Windows 95 and spend hundreds of dollars replacing their existing applications with Windows-95-compliant versions, Microsoft's customers will be able to use long file names; organize files in nested folders; use a mouse to drag files from one window on screen to another; add peripherals without needing an electrical engineering degree, and so on.The Macintosh operating system has had all these impressive features since the mid-1980s.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | April 13, 1992
When the major planets fall into alignment in the heavens, soothsayers prophesy upheaval and chaos.So beware the Ides of April. A similar portentous alignment is occurring this month in the personal computer industry as several major companies introduce new or improved operating system software.Operating system software is the foundation software upon which all other computer applications operate. It is, in an anthropomorphic sense, the soul or DNA of the machine.The most popular operating system is DOS, used by an estimated 70 million computers.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | March 9, 1992
Taligent Inc. officially opened for business last week with 170 experienced employees, two new leaders, the most impressive venture backing in Silicon Valley and one of the toughest challenges faced by any computer software company.Taligent is an independent joint venture of Apple Computer Inc. and the International Business Machines Corp., with a mandate to develop operating system software that will be the foundation for business computers in the mid-1990s and into the 21st century."We think the operating system we're developing is one that can recast the shape of the industry," said Joseph M. Guglielmi, a veteran IBM marketing executive who was named chairman and chief executive of Taligent Feb. 24, five months after Taligent was created.
BUSINESS
By Lawrence J. Magid | October 21, 1991
When IBM and Apple announced their historic pact in July, many PC users and analysts were skeptical. After the Oct. 2 announcement of the details, they still should be.Two former archrivals agreeing to share technology is one thing. Creating useful products is another. There is no question about the relationship itself. IBM and Apple have a lot riding on this agreement and it would be a major embarrassment if it were to dissolve.The marriage certainly makes sense from an image perspective.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
County Comptroller Eugene Curfman had two pieces of bad news for the County Commissioners yesterday when discussing his $1.6 million operating budget request for the coming fiscal year.The county soon may have to switch to a new bank that could charge higher rates to guarantee the county's investments, Curfman said.NationsBank, which guarantees the county's investments, "has put its trust division up for sale," Curfman said at yesterday's hearing on department budget requests for fiscal 1998, which begins July 1."
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 10, 2010
The nation's largest provider of voting equipment will unwind its acquisition last year of its principal rival as part of an antitrust settlement with Maryland and eight other states, the Department of Justice announced. Election Systems & Software completed its purchase of Premier Election Solutions Inc., formerly Diebold Inc., six days before bids were due for the installation of a new optical scan voting system in Maryland. The acquisition limited the state to contracting with the Omaha, Neb., giant or continuing with its current system, according to the office of Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | July 10, 1991
As profitability in the personal computer field has plummeted, there has been a growing realization at IBM that the money and growth in that business will increasingly be found principally at the very bottom of the computer business and at the very top.That means chips at the bottom and operating system software at the top."We want to be able to control our own destiny," said Jack D. Kuehler, IBM's president. "There are two fundamental forces and opportunities to be corralled in the PC marketplace: One is the incredible advances of semiconductor technology.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Financial Service | July 1, 1991
Here are summaries of some recent computing product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:Intel 9600EX Modem. $799 for the PC version, $819 for the Macintosh version. From Intel Corp., 5200 N.E. Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, Ore. 97124. (800) 538-3373.9,600-bit-per-second modems have become the standard for business computing. (Recreational computer users can probably get by with a 2,400-bps modem, which costs only $150 or so.)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.