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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | February 10, 1991
The grating sound of worn-out wiper blades scraping across wet windshields may be a bygone irritation if a University of Maryland researcher can perfect a rubber that resists damage from ozone exposure the way its fans think it will.The United States entered the rubber-making business under a cloud of war. The Japanese invasion of the Malayan Peninsula with all its rubber trees in the early weeks of World War II produced a rubber scare in the United States, driving American chemists to cook up synthetic rubber from a mix of coal and oil.The synthetic rubber industry survived, but current-generation products commonly wear out faster than the natural product, usually because of three factors -- friction, heat and ozone degradation or "dry rot."
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Orioles manager Buck Showalter, back in Baltimore Monday evening to be honored as the Baltimore Sun Marylander of the Year, told a group of local business leaders that former Orioles closer Gregg Olson is planning on joining the team to help with spring training instruction. Olson, who was the Orioles closer from 1989 to 1993, remains the franchise's all-time saves leader with 160. The list of former Orioles who have helped with spring training instruction this spring include catcher Chris Hoiles, outfielder Al Bumbry and outfielder B.J. Surhoff.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 20, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - A joint venture of DuPont Co. and Dow Chemical Co. agreed yesterday to pay an $84 million criminal fine and plead guilty to fixing prices of a synthetic rubber used to make auto parts, furniture and shoes. DuPont Dow Elastomers LLC, of Wilmington, Del., was charged with conspiring with competitors to fix the price of the rubber, known as neoprene, from August 1999 to April 2002. The charge stemmed from a federal investigation of a price-fixing conspiracy in rubber-related chemicals and products.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 20, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - A joint venture of DuPont Co. and Dow Chemical Co. agreed yesterday to pay an $84 million criminal fine and plead guilty to fixing prices of a synthetic rubber used to make auto parts, furniture and shoes. DuPont Dow Elastomers LLC, of Wilmington, Del., was charged with conspiring with competitors to fix the price of the rubber, known as neoprene, from August 1999 to April 2002. The charge stemmed from a federal investigation of a price-fixing conspiracy in rubber-related chemicals and products.
NEWS
February 23, 1996
Michael J. Deutch, 88, an engineer who helped invent the process for making synthetic rubber, died Monday in Washington of complications from a respiratory illness. He was deputy director of the American War Production Board, which supplied necessities such as tires to the war effort, and was among those who developed the method for making synthetic rubber from petroleum. He is the father of CIA Director John M. Deutch.Rabbi Marvin Fox, 73, a scholar of Jewish thought and former director of the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
Martin J. Tierney Sr., who worked during World War II to develop synthetic rubber and later retired as president of Rubicon Chemicals Inc., died Tuesday of complications after gall bladder surgery at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 88 and had settled in Maryland in 1998. Born in Waterbury, Conn., Mr. Tierney earned a bachelor of science degree at Middlebury College in 1936 and was employed in the U.S. Rubber Co. chemical division in Naugatuck, Conn. In 1939, he was studying for a doctorate in chemistry in Stuttgart, Germany, when war broke out, and he returned home.
NEWS
March 8, 1993
* Paul D. Zimmerman, 54, a journalist and screenwriter, died of colon cancer March 2 at the Medical Center at Princeton, N.J. He won a British Academy Award for his screenplay for "The King of Comedy," a 1983 film directed by Martin Scorsese. He contributed to several other films and television programs, including "Lovers and Liars," "Consuming Passions" and "Sesame Street." Early in his career, he was on the staff of Newsweek magazine. Mr. Zimmerman's books included two collaborations with Dick Schaap -- "The Year the Mets Lost Last Place" and "The Open Man," a diary kept by the New York Knicks player Dave DeBusschere -- and "The Marx Brothers at the Movies," which he wrote with Burt Goldblatt.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Orioles manager Buck Showalter, back in Baltimore Monday evening to be honored as the Baltimore Sun Marylander of the Year, told a group of local business leaders that former Orioles closer Gregg Olson is planning on joining the team to help with spring training instruction. Olson, who was the Orioles closer from 1989 to 1993, remains the franchise's all-time saves leader with 160. The list of former Orioles who have helped with spring training instruction this spring include catcher Chris Hoiles, outfielder Al Bumbry and outfielder B.J. Surhoff.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2003
KINSTON, N.C. - Eddie Gray couldn't see, stand or tell what had happened. One second he was watching a machine churn out sheets of synthetic rubber to be molded into medical instruments, the next the room darkened, his ears rang and his knees scraped as he desperately cleared away the fallen chunks of cement that trapped him. "I remember looking out the corner of my eye and debris flying," Gray recalled, a bandage wrapped around his head where he received...
BUSINESS
May 21, 1997
Three Maryland companies and the World Trade Center Institute in Baltimore will receive presidential "E" awards tonight for helping boost U.S. exports.The "E" awards were created by executive order 35 years ago. The award is the first for the World Trade Center Institute, a private, nonprofit organization that helps mid-Atlantic companies develop international business.The institute was recognized for its programs and services, which include a seminar series, market research assistance, an international visitors program and several regional networks on overseas business opportunities.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
Martin J. Tierney Sr., who worked during World War II to develop synthetic rubber and later retired as president of Rubicon Chemicals Inc., died Tuesday of complications after gall bladder surgery at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 88 and had settled in Maryland in 1998. Born in Waterbury, Conn., Mr. Tierney earned a bachelor of science degree at Middlebury College in 1936 and was employed in the U.S. Rubber Co. chemical division in Naugatuck, Conn. In 1939, he was studying for a doctorate in chemistry in Stuttgart, Germany, when war broke out, and he returned home.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2003
KINSTON, N.C. - Eddie Gray couldn't see, stand or tell what had happened. One second he was watching a machine churn out sheets of synthetic rubber to be molded into medical instruments, the next the room darkened, his ears rang and his knees scraped as he desperately cleared away the fallen chunks of cement that trapped him. "I remember looking out the corner of my eye and debris flying," Gray recalled, a bandage wrapped around his head where he received...
NEWS
February 23, 1996
Michael J. Deutch, 88, an engineer who helped invent the process for making synthetic rubber, died Monday in Washington of complications from a respiratory illness. He was deputy director of the American War Production Board, which supplied necessities such as tires to the war effort, and was among those who developed the method for making synthetic rubber from petroleum. He is the father of CIA Director John M. Deutch.Rabbi Marvin Fox, 73, a scholar of Jewish thought and former director of the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass.
NEWS
March 8, 1993
* Paul D. Zimmerman, 54, a journalist and screenwriter, died of colon cancer March 2 at the Medical Center at Princeton, N.J. He won a British Academy Award for his screenplay for "The King of Comedy," a 1983 film directed by Martin Scorsese. He contributed to several other films and television programs, including "Lovers and Liars," "Consuming Passions" and "Sesame Street." Early in his career, he was on the staff of Newsweek magazine. Mr. Zimmerman's books included two collaborations with Dick Schaap -- "The Year the Mets Lost Last Place" and "The Open Man," a diary kept by the New York Knicks player Dave DeBusschere -- and "The Marx Brothers at the Movies," which he wrote with Burt Goldblatt.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | February 10, 1991
The grating sound of worn-out wiper blades scraping across wet windshields may be a bygone irritation if a University of Maryland researcher can perfect a rubber that resists damage from ozone exposure the way its fans think it will.The United States entered the rubber-making business under a cloud of war. The Japanese invasion of the Malayan Peninsula with all its rubber trees in the early weeks of World War II produced a rubber scare in the United States, driving American chemists to cook up synthetic rubber from a mix of coal and oil.The synthetic rubber industry survived, but current-generation products commonly wear out faster than the natural product, usually because of three factors -- friction, heat and ozone degradation or "dry rot."
FEATURES
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | March 20, 1998
Say happy anniversary to that snow-white cup that holds your morning coffee.This year marks 50 years of consumer use of polystyrene foam -- Styrofoam.It's hard to believe that people once made do without foam egg cartons, coolers, craft balls, picnic cups ...Styrofoam was invented in 1941, when World War II was raging and American scientists were scurrying to develop synthetic rubber. A Dow Chemical engineer, Ray McIntire, tried foaming plastic polystyrene, and got a rigid material instead of a rubbery one. But it was also light and buoyant.
NEWS
August 7, 1995
FROM The Hartford Courant:In a world where sleek, speeding Rollerblades and high-tech video games compete for kids' attention, it may be a little surprising that a glob of goo known as Silly Putty keeps bouncing along 45 years after it arrived on the scene.This pliable little plaything became a craze in the 1950s. . . .It's still in play in the '90s.Belinda Lux, a physical therapist . . . says Silly Putty is a good material for hand-squeezing exercises because it has the same consistency as products promoted specifically for that purpose.
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