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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Indiana State Department of Heath announced the nation's first case of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome on May 2. Public health officials are keeping tabs on the virus, which has infected more than 800 people in more than a dozen countries, killing at least 310 of them, according to Reuters. But the officials don't believe the general public is at great risk. Dr. Peter Kadlecik, chief of infectious diseases with Kaiser Permanente, answers questions about this emerging virus.
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FEATURES
Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
When it comes to thinking about people with Down syndrome, Katie Hudson wants the world to take a cue from her 6-year-old daughter, Maddie. "She always says, 'We're all a little different, and that's what makes us the same,'" Hudson said. "She gets it. " That's why Maddie will be walking in honor of her brother, Logan -- and more than 400 others will make strides for inclusion and awareness for people with Down syndrome -- at the First Annual Baltimore Buddy Walk on Nov. 2 at Padonia Park Club in Cockeysville.
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SPORTS
By Mike Vandermause and Green Bay Press-Gazette | October 11, 2013
The defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens face an uphill struggle to repeat last year's success if recent history is any indication. The last team to win back-to-back Super Bowl titles was the New England Patriots in 2003 and 2004, and it's been eight years since a reigning champion won a playoff game the next season. The Green Bay Packers, who play at Baltimore on Sunday, know a little something about the challenges that follow a championship. The Packers won the Super Bowl three years ago and the next season lost in their playoff-opening divisional game against the New York Giants.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The towering height that helped 20-year-old Isaiah Austin shoot to the top ranks of the NBA draft this year also was a symptom of the genetic disorder that, less than one month ago, ended his pro career before it began. But the 7-foot-1-inch Baylor University student counts himself lucky - at least it didn't end his life. Austin learned he has Marfan syndrome thanks to a blood test administered during the NBA draft process. Sometimes the diagnosis of the connective tissue disorder - which can cause the aorta, the main vessel that carries blood from the heart, to grow until it bursts - comes too late.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Our muscles and organs are divided into compartments held together by connective tissue. Damage to the compartments can cause a condition called compartment syndrome, which can cause painful swelling. Dr. Daryl Osbahr, an orthopedic surgeon at Union Memorial Hospital, said if the condition isn't treated soon enough, it can cause long-term damage. What is compartment syndrome and what causes it? Compartment syndrome occurs when an insufficient amount of blood is distributed to other structures within that compartment or enclosed space resulting in a lack of oxygen and nutrients within that area of the body, including the arm, leg, or any other enclosed space.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
Wayne Malone is no longer running the distances he managed in his youth, but he is still racking up miles organizing an annual fundraiser that benefits the Down Syndrome Clinic at Kennedy Krieger in East Baltimore. He will work behind the scenes Sunday at the annual BWI Airport Run and Family Walk, as he has for the last 25 years. The 2011 run marks a financial milestone of more than $500,000 raised for the clinic and for the more than 500 patients who visit it annually, most of them children and teens.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | June 1, 2009
Anna Quindlen, minus 50 IQ points." That was the verdict of the editors of Baltimore's City Paper not long after I started writing an opinion column for this newspaper. Anna Quindlen, minus 50 IQ points. It has been a lot of years, but it still stings. I was simply trying to do what Ms. Quindlen, then a New York Times op-ed page columnist, and Ellen Goodman of the Boston Globe were doing: taking their experiences as women, wives and mothers and telescoping it to reflect on the larger issues of the day. But I didn't need the City Paper to make me feel self-conscious.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
John Elder Robison taught himself electronics while growing up and was so skilled that despite dropping out of high school in ninth grade, he designed pyrotechnic guitars for the rock group Kiss and sound effects for electronic games. Yet to hear him tell it, some of Robison's greatest work comes while he's standing on stage speaking to crowds about how he's lived with Asperger syndrome and conveying to young people with the disorder a message that no one told him when he was a child.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 1996
Since age 19, my menstrual periods have occurred only every three to four months, and my efforts to become pregnant during three years of marriage have been unsuccessful. I have also noticed an increased growth of hair on my face.Do you have any ideas about what might be causing these problems?The difficulties you describe sound like you may have polycystic ovary (PCO) syndrome. Some of the manifestations of this syndrome are menstrual abnormalities and infertility due to lack of regular ovulation, acne, and excessive growth of hair (hirsutism)
ENTERTAINMENT
By JUDITH SCHLESINGER and JUDITH SCHLESINGER,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
The Normal One: Life With a Difficult or Damaged Sibling, by Jeanne Safer. Free Press. 224 pages. $24 . The most dismaying revelation in Jeanne Safer's The Normal One is that no amount of psychologizing can diminish her childhood bitterness. Safer describes the lifelong damage inflicted by her brother Steven, underscoring it with testimony from others whose siblings had problems like schizophrenia, Down syndrome or cerebral palsy. Although Steven was merely overweight and obnoxious, Safer claims equivalent trauma.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Indiana State Department of Heath announced the nation's first case of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome on May 2. Public health officials are keeping tabs on the virus, which has infected more than 800 people in more than a dozen countries, killing at least 310 of them, according to Reuters. But the officials don't believe the general public is at great risk. Dr. Peter Kadlecik, chief of infectious diseases with Kaiser Permanente, answers questions about this emerging virus.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The mother of a Maryland man with Down syndrome who died in police custody last year told a Senate panel Tuesday that the federal government needs to spend more to train law enforcement on how to approach the disabled and mentally ill. Patti Saylor, whose son, Robert "Ethan" Saylor, died of asphyxiation last January while handcuffed on the ground in a Frederick County movie theater, said more should be done to foster relationships between police...
NEWS
March 28, 2014
The "pro-business" agenda outlined by our legislative leaders brings to mind what psychologists call the "Eddie Haskell syndrome" ( "A plan for building Maryland's economy," March 24). Named after the "Leave it to Beaver" character, this syndrome refers to the two different facets of our personalities - the person we are behind closed doors and the person we wish the public to think we are. The analogy fits Maryland's legislative leaders, who govern one way in Annapolis but pretend to have governed another way when they seek re-election.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
I have a 14-year-old female West Highland terrier. She was recently diagnosed with a collapsed trachea.  She is eating and drinking fine. She has this horrible seal-like cough upon rising from a supine position and when she overexerts herself. My vet has been trying to treat her with Prednisone, antibiotics and a bronchodilator. Nothing seems to be helping her. I was thinking about taking her to someone else for a second opinion, but I am not sure it would do any good. Are there any other treatments besides surgery for a collapsed trachea?
SPORTS
By Derek Wattay, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
On April 1, with only a few changes of clothes, a tent, a hammock, a cellphone and a bicycle, Payne will embark on the greatest journey of his young life: a 9,000-mile bike ride across the country and back - alone. While plenty of people pedal coast to coast each year, not many set out with a mission as noble as the Parkton native's. In honor of his older brother, Jacob, who was diagnosed with Williams syndrome in 1995, Payne will trek the country raising awareness for the genetic condition also known as WS. "I wouldn't be the person I am without Jake in my life," Payne, 18, said.
NEWS
By Sean Hannigan | December 19, 2013
My wife thinks I'm incredibly rude because I never introduce her to anyone I'm talking to. She comes up, listens in, waits on the introduce-me square - and I know what she's waiting for, what they're both waiting for - but there's nothing I can do, and I always end up feeling like, and seeming like, a jerk. There is a syndrome where you can't remember names. Two percent of the population has it, and while my case may not be the as severe as some, I'm on the spectrum. Of course I have no idea of what the name of this syndrome is. But it's real.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2001
WHEN 3-YEAR-OLD Kate Offutt was born, she was a beautiful, healthy baby - the perfect addition to an ideal family, with her parents and big brother, Scott, then 4 years old. But that perfect world came crashing down when her parents were told, little more than a year later, that their precious daughter had Rett syndrome, a devastating, incurable neurological disorder that disrupts the ability to use hands, to speak, to walk, and often to comprehend....
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
The game is Name That Syndrome, in which criminal lawyers portray their clients as victims of emotional disorder, not accountable for their actions. It's been going on for years and now we are awash in syndromes, syndromes to cover killing, beating, sexual abuse. There's even one for tax evasion called "failure to file syndrome."This syndrome of syndromes is a murky stew, a mix of legal tactics, forensic psychiatry and a sprinkling of recovery movement ethics. Some parts genuine, others bogus.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The parents of a developmentally disabled man who died after being handcuffed at a Frederick County movie theater have sued Regal Cinemas and the county in federal court. The lawsuit filed Thursday also names the county sheriff's office, three deputies and the movie theater as defendants. Robert "Ethan" Saylor, 26, died in January after the incident at the Westview Regal Cinemas at Westview Promenade in Frederick. In the lawsuit, Patricia and Ronald Saylor accuse the defendants of negligence, violating Ethan Saylor's civil rights and violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. "If any of the Defendants had heeded Mr. Saylor's aide as to how to deal with Mr. Saylor, his tragic and unnecessary death would have been avoided," they say. Saylor had Down syndrome and an IQ of about 40, they say, and it was easy to recognize his developmental disability.
SPORTS
By Mike Vandermause and Green Bay Press-Gazette | October 11, 2013
The defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens face an uphill struggle to repeat last year's success if recent history is any indication. The last team to win back-to-back Super Bowl titles was the New England Patriots in 2003 and 2004, and it's been eight years since a reigning champion won a playoff game the next season. The Green Bay Packers, who play at Baltimore on Sunday, know a little something about the challenges that follow a championship. The Packers won the Super Bowl three years ago and the next season lost in their playoff-opening divisional game against the New York Giants.
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