Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSynchronized Swimming
IN THE NEWS

Synchronized Swimming

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | July 3, 1995
A group of 16 synchronized swimmers has been heading to swimming pools all year, resulting in a team that swims at the competitive level.The Starfish Synchro Club, the only competitive synchronized swim club in the state, is headed by Barbara Nelson of Ellicott City. Her daughter Marsea Nelson studied synchronized swimming at the Howard County YMCA in Ellicott City and was so taken with it that she wanted to continue, even after the YMCA coach moved from the area. The Nelsons found classes and pool time at Fairland Aquatics Center in Laurel, one thing led to another and a team was formed, with Barbara Nelson as the manager.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
December 6, 2011
An article in the Dec. 7, 1961, edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian recognized the participation of several local teenagers in a new aquatic competition. Four 17-year old members of the Rollingwood Pool in Catonsville have entered the first synchronized swimming meet of the South Atlantic Association Amateur Athlete Union. The Aqualite Swim Club of the Y.W.C.A. will be host for the all-day invitational met, which will begin at 9 A.M. this Sunday, Dec. 10 at the Towson YMCA pool.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 28, 2004
ATHENS - It's hard to celebrate sometimes. Not when it's like this. Tammy Crow was supposed to share this medal, just as she thought she'd share her life. She won bronze last night, a flyer on the U.S. synchronized swimming team. Crow accepted it with pride on the medal stand and will soon leave Greece for uncertainty, her past hanging much heavier than any medal. "It's been a roller coaster," she said after her team's performance. "I've had the worst part of my life and the best part of my life."
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 28, 2004
ATHENS - It's hard to celebrate sometimes. Not when it's like this. Tammy Crow was supposed to share this medal, just as she thought she'd share her life. She won bronze last night, a flyer on the U.S. synchronized swimming team. Crow accepted it with pride on the medal stand and will soon leave Greece for uncertainty, her past hanging much heavier than any medal. "It's been a roller coaster," she said after her team's performance. "I've had the worst part of my life and the best part of my life."
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
Ginny Chadwick has the perfect retort for anyone who mocks her sport, synchronized swimming, calling it, oh, things such as theater or show business, but not a real sport. "Come join us in the pool," is what the resident of Oakland Mills village in Columbia says. Because Chadwick knows something her sport's knee-jerk critics don't get: It's flippin' hard to hold your breath for as much as 30 seconds while twisting and turning, keeping time to the music, and looking good in water way deeper than you are tall.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1996
After weeks of practicing pinwheel dolphins, shout strokes and alligator kicks, the moment of truth arrived yesterday for 60 Towson synchronized swimmers.Ponytails bobbed, sequins sparkled and chiffon scarves flowed as the young people dove, jumped and kicked to songs from the '50s and '60s during the 43rd annual water ballet at the Stoneleigh community pool.The performance -- in many respects a quaint anachronism in these days of competitive freestyle swimming -- has never been more popular in the close-knit community.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
Marsea Nelson, age 13, and her mother, Barbara, were at their wits' end last year.They had been making the 50-mile round-trip drive to Frederick twice a week to participate on the Frederick Swans synchronized swim team. But Marsea wanted more.So, last fall, the Ellicott City family started the Starfish Synchro Club, a group of youngsters ages 9 to 13 who perform synchronized swimming -- complex movements of the arms, legs and hands, executed to music."It's a combination of gymnastics, dance and speed swimming," said Marsea.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jackson | July 19, 1998
A synchronized swimmer effortlessly raises one leg into the air as she floats on the water's surface, but behind that graceful maneuver are years of conditioning.In the case of some synchronized swimmers, it's a lot of years of conditioning. "One of the beauties of synchronized swimming is that you can grow old with the sport," says Martha Copeland, a 54-year-old who swims and competes with the D.C. Synchromasters, who perform and compete in national and regional competitions. It's not unusual, she says, to see women competing into their 70s.But to do so, synchronized swimmers must maintain their flexibility and their ability to hold their breath for extended periods under water.
NEWS
November 17, 1993
Members of the Starfish Synchro Club from Fairland Aquatic Center in Laurel traveled to Richmond, Va., for their first synchronized swimming competition on Nov. 6.More than 140 swimmers from Virginia and Maryland participated. Four of the eight swimmers who attended from the Starfish club won ribbons and other members had impressive scores.The team began swimming this year on Oct. 2 with 15 participants. Nine have joined the competitive team. United States Synchronized Swimming Inc., sanctions the team.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 31, 1996
Everybody's weighing in on NBC's policy of tacitly passing off its Olympics coverage as live.ESPN's Bob Ley, during last night's 6: 30 "SportsCenter," plugged an upcoming baseball doubleheader by saying the games would be live, adding slyly, "We promise." A few minutes later, co-anchor Charley Steiner noted that the pending feature on the U.S. men's basketball team would be "plausibly live," the phrase that NBC has been using to describe its coverage.The trouble is, with just five more days to go, the veneer of plausibility continues to erode, although in some cases the network is getting sloppy in its obfuscation.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2004
ATHENS - The U.S. men's basketball team must have visited the Olympic lost-and-found on its day off. After being nearly a scoring no-show for five games, Stephon Marbury found his touch yesterday and atoned with 31 points - a U.S. men's Olympic record - to lead the Americans to a 102-94 victory over previously unbeaten Spain in a quarterfinal matchup. The Americans play Argentina tonight in the semifinals. On a day when rebounding was a struggle and four players were in foul trouble, Marbury's sudden arrival after scoring just 21 points in the tournament made the difference.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 27, 2004
The Olympic info system puts millions of facts, useful and useless, at the fingertips of the 20,000 accredited media types. Just point and click. We use it mostly to figure out important stuff such as, "Who was the most dominant athlete in the history of synchronized swimming?" and "When did the last bus leave for my hotel?" But every so often, there are moments from the Ministry of Electronic information to make you smile or remind you why you came. The fact sheet for the solid-marble Panathinaiko Stadium does both.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 27, 2004
ATHENS - Over the past 13 years, they talked about team, about being teammates. The members of the U.S. women's soccer team talked about little kids who needed strong female role models - female athletes to look up to, to emulate. They talked about nail polish, how they would sit up all night, painting stars and stripes on each other's toenails and who got to choose the color for next time. They giggled when they talked about Julie Foudy's hairdo on some publicity photo, wondering why it was poofy.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
Ginny Chadwick has the perfect retort for anyone who mocks her sport, synchronized swimming, calling it, oh, things such as theater or show business, but not a real sport. "Come join us in the pool," is what the resident of Oakland Mills village in Columbia says. Because Chadwick knows something her sport's knee-jerk critics don't get: It's flippin' hard to hold your breath for as much as 30 seconds while twisting and turning, keeping time to the music, and looking good in water way deeper than you are tall.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 3, 2002
Fluid Movement is so quintessentially Bawlamer, so uncomplicatedly good-hearted, that when it's over, all you want to do is wrap your arms around it and call it Hon. This 22-minute documentary from Baltimore native Beth Pacunas, set for a screening at 6 tonight at the Charles as part of the Maryland Film Festival, lets us watch as a group of performance artists coerce a bunch of everyday Joes and Janes into staging a water ballet at the Patterson Park...
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Valarie Perez Schere, tight yellow shorts over her black bathing suit, tattoos exposed and sunglasses perched on her head, paces poolside in Patterson Park, gesturing and throwing out directions to her cast like a hyped-up Martin Scorsese. The group listens as Schere, a redheaded fireball, describes the scene they're about to rehearse. Their decadent celebration interrupted by the approach of Octavian and his Roman army, the Egyptians jump in the pool, ready for battle. Mass carnage ensues before Mark Antony, believing his beloved Cleopatra is dead, offs himself dramatically with a sword.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 27, 2004
The Olympic info system puts millions of facts, useful and useless, at the fingertips of the 20,000 accredited media types. Just point and click. We use it mostly to figure out important stuff such as, "Who was the most dominant athlete in the history of synchronized swimming?" and "When did the last bus leave for my hotel?" But every so often, there are moments from the Ministry of Electronic information to make you smile or remind you why you came. The fact sheet for the solid-marble Panathinaiko Stadium does both.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Charlie Doble looks like the Falstaff of synchronized swimming as he rehearses for today's water ballet at the Patterson Park pool.He's well-rounded, a bit grizzled and good-humored. He's 49, a construction estimator for the Neighborhood Housing Services, and he's wearing the blue trunks with the red sequins that are his ballet costume."We're not really synchronized," he says. "We're damn near close to drowning, but we're having a great time."Eight guys, six women and a dozen kids practice in the deep-water pool for "Water Shorts!
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Charlie Doble looks like the Falstaff of synchronized swimming as he rehearses for today's water ballet at the Patterson Park pool.He's well-rounded, a bit grizzled and good-humored. He's 49, a construction estimator for the Neighborhood Housing Services, and he's wearing the blue trunks with the red sequins that are his ballet costume."We're not really synchronized," he says. "We're damn near close to drowning, but we're having a great time."Eight guys, six women and a dozen kids practice in the deep-water pool for "Water Shorts!
FEATURES
By Nancy Jackson | July 19, 1998
A synchronized swimmer effortlessly raises one leg into the air as she floats on the water's surface, but behind that graceful maneuver are years of conditioning.In the case of some synchronized swimmers, it's a lot of years of conditioning. "One of the beauties of synchronized swimming is that you can grow old with the sport," says Martha Copeland, a 54-year-old who swims and competes with the D.C. Synchromasters, who perform and compete in national and regional competitions. It's not unusual, she says, to see women competing into their 70s.But to do so, synchronized swimmers must maintain their flexibility and their ability to hold their breath for extended periods under water.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.