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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
A Reisterstown synagogue facing foreclosure is one of an increasing number of U.S. houses of worship suffering in the continuing financial slump. Susquehanna Bank filed to foreclose on Adat Chaim in March, saying in court papers that the 27-year-old synagogue had defaulted on an $800,000 loan taken out in 2005. The Lititz, Pa.-based bank, which filed the case in Baltimore County Circuit Court, listed remaining debt of more than $756,0000. Once nearly unheard of, foreclosures on houses of worship jumped to record numbers nationally in the past two years, showing that religious facilities are not immune to the wave of foreclosures that followed the bursting of the credit bubble.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
An employee at local synagogue has been charged with possessing and distributing child pornography, Baltimore County police said. Police do not believe any children at the Ner-Tamid synagogue in Greenspring Valley were victims of Jonathan J. Lewin, 44, who was recently charged after police found he had shared pornographic images of children online. Detectives began investigating Lewin on May 16 after they traced the source of images to his home in 6600 block of Edenvale Road.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Isaac Hametz doesn't identify as an Orthodox Jew, and neither do many of the Jewish people living in downtown. But the 30-year-old was enlisted by the leader of Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel congregation for a singularly Orthodox quest: Determine how to create a downtown eruv, a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes possible certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Rabbi Etan Mintz, who joined B'nai Israel in August 2012, said an eruv is critical to helping the 140-year-old congregation attract and retain families, and ultimately re-establish itself as the center of a thriving downtown Jewish community.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Isaac Hametz doesn't identify as an Orthodox Jew, and neither do many of the Jewish people living in downtown. But the 30-year-old was enlisted by the leader of Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel congregation for a singularly Orthodox quest: Determine how to create a downtown eruv, a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes possible certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Rabbi Etan Mintz, who joined B'nai Israel in August 2012, said an eruv is critical to helping the 140-year-old congregation attract and retain families, and ultimately re-establish itself as the center of a thriving downtown Jewish community.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
An employee at local synagogue has been charged with possessing and distributing child pornography, Baltimore County police said. Police do not believe any children at the Ner-Tamid synagogue in Greenspring Valley were victims of Jonathan J. Lewin, 44, who was recently charged after police found he had shared pornographic images of children online. Detectives began investigating Lewin on May 16 after they traced the source of images to his home in 6600 block of Edenvale Road.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
Baltimore County police are blaming a "copycat" for a synagogue robbery in Randallstown yesterday morning -- the second in less than 24 hours -- but investigators said the incidents are not being investigated as hate crimes."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
About a dozen kids sat around a long table Sunday afternoon, waiting for the signal. Before each of them was a plate loaded with latkes, the potato pancakes of Hanukkah. Whoever cleaned his or her plate first could claim the title: Champion Latke Eater of 2011. The contest began and ended in a pan-fried blur, with parents cheering, cameras clicking and a lot of determined chewing. The ultimate champ was a curly-haired youngster who, taking the event seriously, had pushed his sleeves up past his elbows.
NEWS
July 19, 2004
Bernard Anshel, a retired accountant who served as president of Winands Road Synagogue in Randallstown for about 15 years, died Tuesday night at Sinai Hospital of complications related to recent heart valve replacement surgery. The Randallstown resident was 87. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Anshel spent his career working in various companies and for state agencies, and retired in 1977, said his wife of 59 years, the former Zelda Goldsmith. But his retirement years were anything but quiet, she said.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
A Columbia synagogue has abandoned its religion-based constitutional challenge to Howard County's land-use authority and asked for formal permission to teach elementary school classes at its day care facility in the Sebring neighborhood.Lubavitch of Howard County was due to plead its case in county JTC circuit court next month against the county Board of Appeals. The Jewish sect members sued the board after it ruled Dec. 6 that the 1989 special zoning exception allowing a religious facility and day care center did not allow first-grade classes.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 8, 2005
One of the most intriguing news stories in the music world lately comes from France, where a modest-budget, critically less-than-acclaimed film called Les Choristes (The Chorus) became a runaway hit when it was released 11 months ago. This tale about a chorus formed at a boarding school for troubled boys in 1949 played to packed houses in the country; when the movie came out on video and DVD last October, more than 2 million copies were sold in France, a record there. But the best part of the story is that kids all over France have started going choral.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Robbie Silverman felt uneasy approaching his rabbi about the subject, fearing the spiritual leader of his congregation would find it weird, or at least silly. But Silverman had lost a loved one only weeks before, and he wanted to do something. He stepped into Rabbi Yerachmiel Shapiro's office at Moses Montefiore Anshe Emunah synagogue in Baltimore County and broached the subject of installing a memorial tribute board similar to those in the hallway and the chapel honoring members of the congregation and their relatives.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
Regarding your recent article on the anniversary of Kristallnacht, I was living in the small East Prussian town of Osterode at the time and recall that infamous day as if it were yesterday ( "Germany marks Kristallnacht's 75th anniversary asking: What tips a society into madness?" Nov. 8). In this small town the beautiful synagogue was destroyed. My first class in the morning was a geography class, and the first words that my teacher spoke were "at last. " We kids only looked at each other in amazement, even though some of us were leaders in the Hitler Youth.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Leon Samuel Idas, who owned a commercial used clothing business and fought the German occupation of his native Greece during World War II, died of a cerebral ailment April 12 at his home in Lauderhill, Fla. He was 87 years old and formerly lived in Bolton Hill. Born in Athens, Greece, he was the son of Samuel and Miriam Ioudas, who also used the name Gabrielides. His father was a textile merchant. "My father's early life was interrupted by the invasion of his beloved homeland, by the Germans during World War II," said his son, Samuel Idas of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. "At 16, Leon fled the Nazi-fortified city of Athens with forged documents and instructions from underground resistance leaders.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Adam Riess, the Nobel Prize-winning astronomy professor at Johns Hopkins University, will discuss the expansion of the universe and its mysteries in an event at Bolton Street Synagogue on Sunday. Riess will present and lead a discussion titled "Exploding Stars, an Expanding Universe and Mysterious Dark Energy" at the Roland Park house of worship. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences recognized him for his work in that area in 2011. He shared the $1.49 million prize with fellow American Saul Perlmutter and U.S.-Australian citizen Brian Schmidt "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae," according to the announcement.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
@baltimoresun.com/weddings BRIDESMAIDS REVISITED Hunter boots, kimonos and other out-of-the-box gift ideas for the girls at your wedding. MOM GIVES THE NUDGE They see each other at the synagogue but his mother is the one to get things moving.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Wedding Day: August 25, 2012 Her story: Emily Farbman, 25, grew up in Owings Mills. She lives in Canton and is in her fourth year of the audiology doctoral program at Towson University. Her father, Howard Farbman, is president of American Lumber Corp. Her mother, Dana Farbman, is an early intervention nurse at Baltimore County Public Schools Infants & Toddlers Program. His story: Ross Taylor, 27, grew up in Pikesville. He is general manager at Taylor Property Group and lives in Canton.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
Three months after its doors opened, Beth Shalom Congregation will hold a formal dedication ceremony today for its synagogue, the first synagogue built from the ground up in Howard County.WJZ-TV news anchorwoman Sally Thorner will be the emcee of the 90-minute ceremony, which will begin at 1 p.m. at the synagogue at 8070 Guilford Road in Simpsonville.U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland, 3rd District Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and County Executive Charles I. Ecker will be among the dignitaries attending, said Kenneth L. Cohen, the congregation's rabbi.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 11, 2002
In a transaction that will add 2 acres to the city's public land, a patch of meadow and woods along a stream in North Baltimore has been sold to the city with the state providing $150,000 for the transaction. The seller is the Bolton Street Synagogue, which is building a new synagogue next to the meadow in the 200 block of West Cold Spring Lane. Synagogue leaders agreed to sell the north half of their 4-acre parcel to address the community's wish to preserve recreational green space and access to Stoney Run in the Evergreen neighborhood on the east side of Roland Park.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Leaders of a Reisterstown synagogue facing foreclosure said Tuesday that they had reached an agreement with lender Susquehanna Bank to allow the sale of the building on Cockeys Mill Road. "We were able to achieve the goal of allowing the congregation to emerge on a stronger financial foundation for future growth," Arthur Wolf, president of the Synagogue Adat Chaim, said in a statement. The congregation is exploring options for a new location, Wolf said. Members plan to gather in late June to remove the Torah scrolls from the building and install them in an interim home.
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