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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1998
For most of the summer, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall has looked like Miss Havisham's parlor in "Great Expectations" - except that, instead of cobwebs, the cinnamon seats have been swathed in plastic and the plastic in a patina of dust.For two months the hall has been a construction site, with a dozen projects going on at once. On July 2, the day after the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra finished its Summer MusicFest concerts, workers began tearing up the wooden stage floor and its cement and steel underpinnings.
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By Robert B. Reich | December 18, 2013
It's charity time, and not just because the holiday season reminds us to be charitable. As the tax year draws to a close, the charitable tax deduction beckons. America's wealthy are its largest beneficiaries. According to the Congressional Budget Office, $33 billion of last year's $39 billion in total charitable deductions went to the richest 20 percent of Americans, of whom the richest 1 percent reaped the lion's share. The generosity of the super-rich is sometimes proffered as evidence they're contributing as much to the nation's well-being as they did decades ago, when they paid a much larger share of their earnings in taxes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Kinker | December 6, 2007
Baltimore's African-American symphony orchestra, Soulful Symphony, performs its holiday showcase, A Great Joy, this Saturday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The 75-person ensemble of musicians and vocalists is known for blending jazz and gospel with rhythm and blues. This performance will feature traditional holiday music with a gospel twist as well as featured soloists and choral performances. The holiday showcase is at 8 p.m. Saturday at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $18-$58.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Baltimore has a national-class football team, and The Sun devotes a whole section to it during the season. Baltimore has a national-class baseball team, and The Sun devotes many pages to it during the season. Baltimore has a world-class symphony orchestra, and The Sun ignores reviewing its performances. Last Friday, a full symphony hall enjoyed a wonderful program with the most enthusiastic response that I have witnessed in 42 years as a subscriber. To Sun print readers, the program didn't exist.
NEWS
January 14, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the Maryland Commission on African-American History and Culture will present the 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Concert at 7: 30 p.m. tomorrow at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.The celebration is the state's official tribute to the civil rights leader, and will include remarks by Gov. and Mrs. Parris N. Glendening and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, and performances by pianist Terrence Wilson and the 90-member ecumenical choir, With One Voice.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 23, 2006
MISSING ... Such a simple, straightforward word, but almost unbearably heavy, with layer upon layer of meaning, when intoned and repeated by a boy's voice during the opening moments of John Adams' On the Transmigration of Souls, his Pulitzer Prize-winning composition, premiered a year after the attacks of 9 / 11. OF MUSIC AND MEMORY: ON THE TRANSMIGRATION OF SOULS / / BSO / / 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 3 p.m. April 30 / / Meyerhoff Symphony Hall /...
FEATURES
February 25, 1992
A memorial service for conductor Andrew Schenck, originally scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, has been rescheduled by his family for 4 p.m. that day at the Church of Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.An annual scholarship in his name has been established at Tanglewood, the summer home and school of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Contributions may be sent to the Andrew Schenck Memorial Fund in care of Robin Yorks, Boston Symphony, Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 28, 1999
Insect ZooHave plans for lunch on Saturday? How about a bit of insect cuisine at Gwynns Falls Leakin Park? The grand opening of the Insect Zoo at Carrie Murray Outdoor Education Campus features creepy, crawly, tasty insect samples, as well as cooking demonstrations, cockroach races, insect crafts, bee-keeping events, a tarantula-feeding demonstration, preserved insect displays and a meeting with an entomologist from the Smithsonian Orkin Insect Zoo. Event...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 12, 1998
'Water, Water Everywhere'Music can evoke images, imitate sounds and even influencmoods. Saturday, in the Classically Kids Concert "Water, Water Everywhere" at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra creates the sounds and feel of water. Children ages 7 to 12 will be introduced to the world of classical music with narrator Rheda Becker and conductor Daniel Hege leading the BSO in sounds of rushing water, pounding waves, flowing rivers and booming thunderstorms.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 14, 2007
There's a great story about Ralph Vaughan Williams reacting to the experience of hearing his Symphony No. 4 for the first time: "I don't know whether I like it, but it's what I meant." Some listeners at the premiere in 1935 were convinced that this extraordinary British composer meant to describe the unease building in Europe, a notion he denied. But there's something so intense and even violent in this music, which received a gripping performance by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on Thursday night, that it's hard not to read into it all sorts of deep, ominous meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2011
Louis C.K., the stand-up comic, as if he needs an introduction, performed Friday at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Contributor Lexie Mountain reviews the show. Louis CK walked out onstage for his second set at the Meyerhoff amazingly enough, at about a half-hour past door time, and just started talking. No opener, no introduction, no whatever: in his words, “I just wanted to start.” A shock rippled through the crowd, as if the person everyone expected to ride in on an elephant like a pasha had instead used the side door and said, 'What's Up.' He was wearing his usual uniform: black t-shirt, jeans, New Balance running shoes, and appeared healthier and more lively than "Louie," the sitcom on FX that he writes, produces, edits and stars in. He seemed to revel in the element of surprise, and this buoyed the entire evening: a real feeling of spontaneity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
A night at the symphony is the most sought-after concert ticket in town this week. But while conductor Marin Alsop and her Baltimore orchestra will be on stage, they're not exactly the main draw. That would be Trey Anastasio, the guitarist and vocalist best known as the frontman of Phish, which enjoys a devoted fan base not seen since the Grateful Dead. On Thursday, Anastasio will perform the East Coast premiere of Time Turns Elastic, a 30-minute piece that blends electric guitar and vocal solos into a rich orchestral fabric.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Kinker | December 6, 2007
Baltimore's African-American symphony orchestra, Soulful Symphony, performs its holiday showcase, A Great Joy, this Saturday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The 75-person ensemble of musicians and vocalists is known for blending jazz and gospel with rhythm and blues. This performance will feature traditional holiday music with a gospel twist as well as featured soloists and choral performances. The holiday showcase is at 8 p.m. Saturday at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $18-$58.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 14, 2007
There's a great story about Ralph Vaughan Williams reacting to the experience of hearing his Symphony No. 4 for the first time: "I don't know whether I like it, but it's what I meant." Some listeners at the premiere in 1935 were convinced that this extraordinary British composer meant to describe the unease building in Europe, a notion he denied. But there's something so intense and even violent in this music, which received a gripping performance by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on Thursday night, that it's hard not to read into it all sorts of deep, ominous meaning.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 23, 2006
MISSING ... Such a simple, straightforward word, but almost unbearably heavy, with layer upon layer of meaning, when intoned and repeated by a boy's voice during the opening moments of John Adams' On the Transmigration of Souls, his Pulitzer Prize-winning composition, premiered a year after the attacks of 9 / 11. OF MUSIC AND MEMORY: ON THE TRANSMIGRATION OF SOULS / / BSO / / 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 3 p.m. April 30 / / Meyerhoff Symphony Hall /...
NEWS
By Rachael Worby | July 29, 2005
I DON'T know that I can even remember the first time someone asked me what it was like to be a "woman conductor," but I can remember being a bit curious about the question. True, I am a conductor and a woman, but putting the two descriptions together rarely entered my consciousness. I do remember very clearly, though, sometime in the late 1970s, attending a screening of Judy Collins' documentary tribute to her friend and mentor, conductor Antonia Brico, who died in 1989 at 87, and thinking, "It must have been tough in the old days."
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Baltimore has a national-class football team, and The Sun devotes a whole section to it during the season. Baltimore has a national-class baseball team, and The Sun devotes many pages to it during the season. Baltimore has a world-class symphony orchestra, and The Sun ignores reviewing its performances. Last Friday, a full symphony hall enjoyed a wonderful program with the most enthusiastic response that I have witnessed in 42 years as a subscriber. To Sun print readers, the program didn't exist.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | March 12, 2005
HIS NAME appears nowhere in or on the symphony hall with the soaring sound, and yet the idea of a permanent home for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was his. From Sergiu Comissiona's arrival in Baltimore in 1969, the BSO musical director pressed the case with his patron and symphony benefactor, Joseph A. Meyerhoff. The self-made millionaire builder and philanthropist recognized the need. But he also understood, perhaps better than his Romanian-born friend did, the impact such a hall and a world-class orchestra would have on the cultural and civic life of Baltimore - and its Crab Town image.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 23, 2005
When the players of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra took the stage of the Music Center at Strathmore Thursday night for a summer festival concert, they gave every appearance of normality, after what was probably the most abnormal week of their professional lives. Then again, the opening piece on the program just happened to be called Facade, so you never know. The orchestra's heavily publicized objection to naming a new music director, and the decision by the BSO board of directors to proceed with the historic appointment of Marin Alsop to that post, must have taken a severe toll on morale in the ensemble.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 7, 2005
If you're thinking of skipping this weekend's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert because you don't recognize the names of the guest artists, or because the program looks too ordinary, think again. This is one of the season's most enjoyable efforts. Not that I expect you to take my word for it. After all, I'm the guy who failed to notice that the BSO "didn't sound good enough" to play Debussy in Carnegie Hall last week (as The New York Times declared). So you'll have to hear for yourself whether the musicians can really do justice to works by Mozart, Beethoven and Grieg.
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