Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSymphony
IN THE NEWS

Symphony

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 1, 1996
Capstone Pharmacy Services of Baltimore yesterday completed the $150 million purchase of Symphony Pharmacy Services, the long-term-care pharmacy division of Integrated Health Services of Owings Mills.The deal had been announced five weeks ago. For Integrated, it allows the company to concentrate on its long-term-care business. It is expected to provide cash to make acquisitions in areas such as home health care.For Capstone, it vastly expands the business, which provides pharmacy services to prisons and to nursing homes and other long-term-care facilities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
The last weekend of September could not have been much more caloric, musically speaking, without actually clogging arteries. While the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reveling in the high romanticism of Rachmaninoff and Korngold ( my review was posted earlier ), the Peabody Symphony Orchestra gorged on hefty emotional outpouring by Brahms and Tchaikovsky. I rather enjoyed both lyrical feasts. On Saturday night, Hajime Teri Murai, director of orchestral activities at Peabody for more than two decades, got the conservatory's 2014-2015 concert series rocking with a crisp, jazzy little curtain raiser, Shafer Mahoney's "Sparkle.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 30, 1991
Someone's doing something right at the Peabody Conservatory.Saturday's inaugural concert of the Peabody Symphony, under its new music director Hajime Teri Murai, demonstrated that the conservatory has become a markedly better institution in the last few years. Open a closet door at Peabody nowadays and a talented string player is likely to fall out.In Weber's "Oberon Overture," it was quickly apparent that one was listening to a student orchestra that often came close to professional excellence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An extra spark in the playing at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's first program of the 2014-2015 subscription series a week ago made me think this would turn out to be an exceptional season. Something about the second program this weekend made me even more convinced. I know you are tired of hearing me say this, but I just want to make sure it's sinking in - the BSO is operating at a technical peak these days and demonstrating a tighter rapport than ever with music director Marin Alsop.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 6, 1996
Perhaps the second most wonderful thing about being young is being slow to recognize danger or difficultly. That's surely one reason why the battle of the skies in World War II was won putting American teen-agers in fighter planes. It must also have been a factor in the convincing performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 6 that the Peabody Symphony Orchestra gave Saturday evening in Friedberg Concert Hall.Under the baton of their music director, Hajime Teri Murai, the young musicians performed this fiercely difficult work, the most tragic in the Mahler canon, with energy, stamina and accuracy that would have made a professional orchestra proud.
FEATURES
November 16, 2005
Tonight at 7, the Goucher Chamber Symphony presents a performance including such works as Edvard Grieg's "Holberg Suite" and the "Shepherd's Dance" from Amahl and the Night Visitors. The event is free and takes place in Goucher College's Haebler Memorial Chapel, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road. For information, call the box office at 410-337-6333.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 15, 1994
Gordon Cyr's Symphony No. 2 shares with Dimitri Shostakovich's Symphony No. 6 a peculiarity of construction. An emotionally gigantic (and in the case of the Shostakovich, gigantic in duration) first movement is followed by two smaller movements that seem to bear little relation to it.In the case of the Shostakovich No. 6, this works out well enough because the second and third movements are fun to listen to and easy to follow. In the case of the Cyr No. 2, which received its world premiere in Meyerhoff Hall last night from David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony, I was lost after the first movement.
NEWS
September 27, 1993
Mention "minimalism" in the same breath as "avant-garde classical music" and you're likely to send the average record buyer scurrying for cover behind the nearest Madonna poster. So we were intrigued by a report from London earlier this year describing the spectacular success of Baltimore Symphony Orchestra conductor David Zinman's recording of Polish composer Henryk Gorecki's Symphony No. 3, which reached the top of the British classical and pop charts, and outsold both Madonna and David Bowie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 1, 1991
David Zinman's tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra may be remembered for giving birth to some important pieces of American music. One of the best of them may be John Harbison's Symphony No. 3, which was commissioned for the BSO's 75th season and which received its premiere last night in Meyerhoff Hall.The symphony -- it runs a little more than 20 minutes, and its five movements are played without pause -- doesn't contain anything that cries out to be remembered.But it is beautifully put together and explores a broad spectrum of emotions.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 9, 1998
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10 is a difficult piece to hold together: a gigantic and weighty first movement that is followed by a brief, if ferocious, scherzo; and a pensive third movement, ending in a ghostly passage for flute and piccolo, that is followed by a drunkenly joyous finale that sounds almost as if it could be by Haydn.There are echoes of other works -- Liszt's "Faust" Symphony, Mahler's Symphony No. 2 and even Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" Sonata -- but the Tenth is an utterly original work, as great as it is difficult.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Hilary Hahn has canceled her scheduled season-opening performance of Beethoven's Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop this weekend due to muscle strain. In mid-July, Hahn announced that she would cancel all engagements for six weeks due to an inflamed muscle. Her recovery is taking longer than expected; she is now set to resume concertizing in October. Playing the Beethoven concerto in Hahn's stead will be Pinchas Zukerman, his first BSO engagement in 14 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
"Great Performances," the PBS showcase of American performing arts, came to town for the Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six Saturday night and showed how to make great, live television. On paper, the lineup of talent for the concert celebrating the bicentennial of the national anthem was a very mixed bag: Melissa Etheridge, Denyce Graves-Montgomery, Little Big Town, Smokey Robinson, Kenny Rogers, Kristin Chenoweth, Jordin Sparks, Pentatonix, Paulo Szot, Train, The Navy Band Sea Chanters and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Marin Alsop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has appointed Markus Stenz as principal guest conductor for a three-year term commencing with the 2015-2016 season. The German conductor, who is principal conductor of the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, made a sensational BSO debut in 2012 . In a statement released Wednesday, Stenz said that his "first encounter [with the BSO] in October 2012 is unforgettable to me. I loved the musicians' sophisticated and joyous approach to music making and look forward to experiencing a wide variety of repertoire with the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Anton Bruckner's epic symphonies, rather like the structures of Stonehenge, continue to loom large and strange and beautiful. These products of a fierce faith do not give up their secrets easily. No wonder many listeners, in Bruckner's day and since, have walked warily away from what Brahms dismissed as "symphonic boa constrictors. " But once you let the music wrap itself tightly around you, once you start to see the carefully laid structures and feel their spirit, it's hard to let go. If you have not yet had this experience, get to the Kennedy Center to hear the National Symphony Orchestra perform Bruckner's Eighth conducted by Christoph Eschenbach ( remaining opportunities are Friday and Saturday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
  By now, you have surely heard all about the Seattle Symphony's Web-phenomenon -- a viral YouTube clip of the orchestra teaming up with Sir Mix-a-Lot for a version of his 1990s posterior-fixated rap hit "Baby Got Back. " By now, you may also be in counseling after seeing the video. Some folks, among them the ever-readable classical music pooh-bah Norman Lebrecht , have railed mightily against what went down in Seattle. Others see this as a harmless bit of cross-over that can catch the attention of folks who otherwise may never give a symphony orchestra a second thought.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A year after 9/11, the New York Philharmonic premiered "On the Transmigration of Souls," a reflective work for chorus and orchestra by John Adams that incorporates words and phrases from messages posted near the site of the World Trade Center, from interviews with survivors and, most chillingly, from a flight attendant on one of the doomed planes. To follow such a somber work, the Philharmonic's then-music director Lorin Maazel chose music of solidarity and joy, Beethoven's Symphony No. 9. This pairing seemed just right to me when I heard that Philharmonic concert almost 12 years ago. It seemed just as right, just as effective, when Marin Alsop led the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in this same pairing on Thursday night at Meeryhoff Hall to close the 2013-2014 season.
NEWS
By Timothy Hogan | February 4, 2007
What turned out to be some of the most turbulent days in modern American history - a time of great suffering, uncertainty, fear and paranoia - gave birth to a musical work that provided artistic refuge to me as a Maryland composer. On the day the country experienced the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, I and another artist began scripting the Day of Sorrow Symphony, which was not a musical work that I could have ever imagined, conceived or planned previously. Though the classical score has been described as beautiful and remorseful, yet an emotionally uplifting work by the select few who have heard it, it was a philharmonic work that I would have rather not existed, or at least not under the tragic circumstances that originally gave birth to it. I was on my way to work at the Senator Theatre that morning.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 22, 1994
Shostakovich, Symphony No. 8 in C Minor (opus 65), "Funeral and Triumphal Prelude" (opus 130) and "Novorossiisk Chimes," performed by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir Ashkenazy conductor (London 436 736-2); Shostakovich, Symphony No. 8, performed by the Berlin Philharmonic, Semyon Bychkov conductor (Philips 432 090-2).Of Shostakovich's harrowing symphonies, No. 8 may be the greatest. It used to be classified as the composer's response to the horrors of World War II. But the piece was written as the Germans fled the Red Army after their collapse at Stalingrad and it has been argued more recently -- by Ashkenazy, among others -- that the Eighth is more generally about the tragedy of life in a totalitarian system and is filled with fears about the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Angelo Gatto spoke softly and carried a small baton, but the slender 92-year-old conductor had no trouble getting respect from the musicians of the Maryland Youth Symphony Orchestra rehearsing for Saturday's milestone concert. The milestone is Gatto's final concert as music director of the orchestra, which he founded 50 years ago. During that time, he mentored an estimated 3,000 students from the area, inspiring many to pursue musical careers. Alumni can be found in such major orchestras as the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and on podiums leading ensembles of their own. To the players rehearsing at the Center for the Arts on the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County, Gatto offered his trademark instruction: "Don't just play notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra could have included just a little sample of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" to go with its latest program, which includes the overture and incidental music Mendelssohn wrote under the spell of that play. But this is an all-out production, and a beguiling one at that. Created in association with Washington's superb Folger Theatre, the semi-staged presentation, cleverly adapted and directed by Edward Berkeley, provides a generous helping of "Midsummer.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.