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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 12, 1991
It's no secret to readers of this newspaper that -- compared to their concert performances -- the recordings of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and David Zinman for the Telarc label have been disappointments.Part of the problem seems to have been the performances themselves -- performing for microphones is not the same as performing for people, and the BSO is not exactly a frequent visitor to the recording studio. But at least as important a reason is that Telarc's engineers did not seem to know how to record in Meyerhoff Hall.
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November 19, 2009
TODAY BEAUJOLAIS NOUVEAU CELEBRATION: Alizee Bistro and Wine Bar, 4 W. University Parkway, celebrates 2009 wine with a three-course French menu. The $29 menu includes several options for each course, including celery root bisque or chicken liver and foie gras pate for the first course, coq au vin or seared salmon roulade for the second, and tarte tatin or creme brulee for dessert. Call 443-449-6200. FROM SEA TO SHINING CITY: The Bearman Gallery, 1417 Thames St., presents 24 geometric and landscape paintings by Daniel Stuelpnagel.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 1997
The program that the Baltimore Symphony and music director David Zinman performed last night in Meyerhoff Hall is one of two with which they will tour Japan later this month.Michael Torke's "Bright Blue Music," Debussy's "La Mer" and Berlioz' "Symphonie Fantastique" are works that play to the strengths and experiences of this orchestra and conductor. Those strengths are an almost unshakable sense of rhythm, a finely tuned ensemble and a wind section that is more than equal to the demands of the Debussy and Berlioz works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | May 22, 2008
Witches dance eerily at a funeral, two would-be enemies accidentally fall in love, and hallucinations plague a Harvard scientist at Sunday's Greater Baltimore Youth Orchestra finale concert at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The scenes aren't visually depicted. Rather, these stories are illustrated through music in Journeys of the Mind, a program in which some of the pieces share the same theme: altered mental states.
FEATURES
By Ernest Imhoff | December 19, 1991
For classical-music lovers, the BSO's new album, "Michael Torke's Color Music" (Argo), should be a fine addition to the stocking.The disc has five pieces named for colors -- "Green," "Purple," "Ecstatic Orange," "Ash" and "Bright Blue Music." Torke, who associates colors with tones, is a 30-year-old American composer with a nicely developing reputation.Also, keep an eye out for two other BSO CDs on the Telarc label from the spring of this year: Stravinsky's "The Firebird, Petrushka and Fireworks," and "Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique, Roman Carnival and Les Srancs-Juges Overtures.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1998
Anyone who thinks drug-induced musical dreams are exclusive to 1960s rock-'n'-rollers doesn't know classical music very well.For sitting at the core of the symphonic repertoire is Hector Berlioz's immensely colorful "Symphonie Fantastique," the five-movement tale of a fixated lover and his opium-inspired dream gone bad.With its hair-raising "March to the Scaffold" and a phantasmagoric "Witches Sabbath" punctuated by the sounds of demons, sorcerers and...
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2004
One might think that on a concert program dominated by Hector Berlioz's splashy, phantasmagoric Symphonie Fantastique and Beethoven's weighty "Coriolan" Overture, a little-known 20th-century work could get lost in the shuffle. But when the conductor is Jason Love and the ensemble doing the playing is his Columbia Orchestra, that assumption goes out the window. Love's musical sensibilities are steeped in the contemporary idiom, and the most memorable moments of his tenure here have been achieved in works by Igor Stravinsky, Silvestre Revueltas, John Adams and other 20th-century composers.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 6, 1992
"The French are the wittiest, the most charming and (up to the present at all events), the least musical people on earth," wrote Stendhalin "The Life of Rossini" in 1824.Boy, let's hope he was exaggerating, or that the trend subsided. If the good baron had it right, it's going to be a long weekend at Maryland Hall, where the Annapolis Symphony is about to present its fourth concert of the season, a program devoted to works by Saint Saens, Faure, Franck and Berlioz, Frenchmen all."They make a nice little group," says ASO conductor Gisele Ben-Dor, who will lead the performances tonight and tomorrow night, with a laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | May 22, 2008
Witches dance eerily at a funeral, two would-be enemies accidentally fall in love, and hallucinations plague a Harvard scientist at Sunday's Greater Baltimore Youth Orchestra finale concert at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The scenes aren't visually depicted. Rather, these stories are illustrated through music in Journeys of the Mind, a program in which some of the pieces share the same theme: altered mental states.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009
TODAY BEAUJOLAIS NOUVEAU CELEBRATION: Alizee Bistro and Wine Bar, 4 W. University Parkway, celebrates 2009 wine with a three-course French menu. The $29 menu includes several options for each course, including celery root bisque or chicken liver and foie gras pate for the first course, coq au vin or seared salmon roulade for the second, and tarte tatin or creme brulee for dessert. Call 443-449-6200. FROM SEA TO SHINING CITY: The Bearman Gallery, 1417 Thames St., presents 24 geometric and landscape paintings by Daniel Stuelpnagel.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2004
One might think that on a concert program dominated by Hector Berlioz's splashy, phantasmagoric Symphonie Fantastique and Beethoven's weighty "Coriolan" Overture, a little-known 20th-century work could get lost in the shuffle. But when the conductor is Jason Love and the ensemble doing the playing is his Columbia Orchestra, that assumption goes out the window. Love's musical sensibilities are steeped in the contemporary idiom, and the most memorable moments of his tenure here have been achieved in works by Igor Stravinsky, Silvestre Revueltas, John Adams and other 20th-century composers.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
Columbia's 2004-2005 concert season begins next weekend, not with a trickle but with a deluge. The Columbia Orchestra, Howard County's premier ensemble for instrumental music, takes the Rouse Theatre stage at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23. Works by Beethoven, Berlioz and 20th- century master Paul Hindemith will be on the program that will be led by Jason Love, the ensemble's conductor. Anchoring the concert will be classical music's ultimate drug trip gone bad, Berlioz's phantasmagoric Symphonie Fantastique.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1998
Anyone who thinks drug-induced musical dreams are exclusive to 1960s rock-'n'-rollers doesn't know classical music very well.For sitting at the core of the symphonic repertoire is Hector Berlioz's immensely colorful "Symphonie Fantastique," the five-movement tale of a fixated lover and his opium-inspired dream gone bad.With its hair-raising "March to the Scaffold" and a phantasmagoric "Witches Sabbath" punctuated by the sounds of demons, sorcerers and...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 1997
The program that the Baltimore Symphony and music director David Zinman performed last night in Meyerhoff Hall is one of two with which they will tour Japan later this month.Michael Torke's "Bright Blue Music," Debussy's "La Mer" and Berlioz' "Symphonie Fantastique" are works that play to the strengths and experiences of this orchestra and conductor. Those strengths are an almost unshakable sense of rhythm, a finely tuned ensemble and a wind section that is more than equal to the demands of the Debussy and Berlioz works.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 6, 1992
"The French are the wittiest, the most charming and (up to the present at all events), the least musical people on earth," wrote Stendhalin "The Life of Rossini" in 1824.Boy, let's hope he was exaggerating, or that the trend subsided. If the good baron had it right, it's going to be a long weekend at Maryland Hall, where the Annapolis Symphony is about to present its fourth concert of the season, a program devoted to works by Saint Saens, Faure, Franck and Berlioz, Frenchmen all."They make a nice little group," says ASO conductor Gisele Ben-Dor, who will lead the performances tonight and tomorrow night, with a laugh.
FEATURES
By Ernest Imhoff | December 19, 1991
For classical-music lovers, the BSO's new album, "Michael Torke's Color Music" (Argo), should be a fine addition to the stocking.The disc has five pieces named for colors -- "Green," "Purple," "Ecstatic Orange," "Ash" and "Bright Blue Music." Torke, who associates colors with tones, is a 30-year-old American composer with a nicely developing reputation.Also, keep an eye out for two other BSO CDs on the Telarc label from the spring of this year: Stravinsky's "The Firebird, Petrushka and Fireworks," and "Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique, Roman Carnival and Les Srancs-Juges Overtures.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff YdB | June 21, 1991
Hector Berlioz, the feverish Romantic who lived riotously in his own imagination, was fond of comments like, "Five hundred thousand curses on musicians who do not count their bars." Igor Stravinsky, the cunning revolutionary, gave not a nickel to critics: "Their attitude certainly can not make me deviate from my path."Dramatic early works by these two influential and self-conscious composers are played invitingly in the latest compact discs recorded by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on the Telarc label.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
Columbia's 2004-2005 concert season begins next weekend, not with a trickle but with a deluge. The Columbia Orchestra, Howard County's premier ensemble for instrumental music, takes the Rouse Theatre stage at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23. Works by Beethoven, Berlioz and 20th- century master Paul Hindemith will be on the program that will be led by Jason Love, the ensemble's conductor. Anchoring the concert will be classical music's ultimate drug trip gone bad, Berlioz's phantasmagoric Symphonie Fantastique.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff YdB | June 21, 1991
Hector Berlioz, the feverish Romantic who lived riotously in his own imagination, was fond of comments like, "Five hundred thousand curses on musicians who do not count their bars." Igor Stravinsky, the cunning revolutionary, gave not a nickel to critics: "Their attitude certainly can not make me deviate from my path."Dramatic early works by these two influential and self-conscious composers are played invitingly in the latest compact discs recorded by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on the Telarc label.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 12, 1991
It's no secret to readers of this newspaper that -- compared to their concert performances -- the recordings of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and David Zinman for the Telarc label have been disappointments.Part of the problem seems to have been the performances themselves -- performing for microphones is not the same as performing for people, and the BSO is not exactly a frequent visitor to the recording studio. But at least as important a reason is that Telarc's engineers did not seem to know how to record in Meyerhoff Hall.
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