Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSymbolism
IN THE NEWS

Symbolism

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 19, 1990
For 12 hours straight yesterday Roger Hayden did what few politicians could have done; he sat in the county office building patiently and listened as constituents, one-by-one, offered complaints, comments, concerns and ideas in a new forum the executive is calling "face-to-face" chats.It is true, of course, as it has always been, that any one of the men and women who talked with Hayden Tuesday could just as well have called the executive's office with their ideas and problems, or contacted their county council member, and would probably have gotten as attentive a hearing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 3, 2014
A few words about the "poor door. " Maybe you already know about this. Maybe you read on Slate, saw on Colbert or heard on NPR how a developer qualified for tax benefits under New York City's Inclusionary Housing Program by agreeing to add to its new luxury building on the Upper West Side set a number of "affordable" apartments. How the company won permission to build that building with two entrances, one in front for the exclusive use of upper-income residents, another, reportedly in the alley, for residents of more modest means.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 13, 1994
In the name of fighting crime, the General Assembly appears poised to approve a referendum on a "victims rights" constitutional amendment that even its key supporters admit would not stop one thug from plying his trade. They also concede that the measure's value is far more symbolic than substantive. As Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., the state's top law enforcement official, blithely put it, "Well, so what? What's wrong with a symbol if you really feel good about it?"And there you have it: The irresistible symbolism of this proposal is precisely why every Annapolis politician seeking re-election in 1994 has lined up behind it, including many who formerly opposed it. The pols know are fully aware that in this year of anti-crime posturing, few things will play as well on the stump as their having favored a bill that is named for "victims rights" and supposedly fights back against criminals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
For 40 years, Bob Hieronimus' mural has stood watch over the Charles North community, its depictions of an American eagle, the great seal of the United States and Baltimore's Battle Monument serving as a constant in the evolving neighborhood. Now, a new coat of paint and an enlarged canvas should ensure it continues to do so for at least another four decades. Called "The Bicentennial Mural" when it was first painted in 1974 on a wall overlooking a park at Lafayette and St. Paul streets, Hieronimus' work has expanded in both size and scope.
NEWS
By DAVID C. MORRISON | March 14, 1993
"Anything we drop, even if it's very little, if it gets to someone who needs it, then it's a successful mission," a young Air Force sergeant recently told the New York Times, describing the U.S. airlift of food and medical supplies to besieged Muslims in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina.The problem is, Pentagon officials are hard-pressed to cite anything more than "anecdotal evidence" the relief supplies are being recovered by those who need and deserve them most. There is better than anecdotal evidence, however, that the lion's share of the tons of supplies being airdropped are being recovered by Serbian aggressors.
FEATURES
By Jeannette Belliveau and Jeannette Belliveau,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2000
Every Lunar New Year for most of the past 4,698 years, costume dragons have danced through China's cities and villages. They weave through smoky streets, past balconies dangling strings of firecrackers, noisily popping to drive evil spirits away. For far longer than just two millenniums, the Chinese have tried, through good times and bad, to thoroughly clean house, pay off all debts, gather with family members -- no matter how scattered -- and usher in the New Year at tables groaning with a feast of symbolic dishes.
NEWS
December 8, 1998
SYMBOLISM PLAYS a role in public office, and Janet S. Owens used it to her advantage at her inauguration as Anne Arundel County executive. She plans to run a "people's" administration that is open and responsive to the public.In the past, the executive's swearing-in ceremony was private. Like former President Jimmy Carter and first lady, Rosalynn, who walked rather than rode in the inauguration parade, Ms. Owens held a public ceremony in nonmagisterial surroundings. Ms. Owens took the oath in the Anne Arundel Community College gymnasium.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | October 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Timorously, as if afraid to look, Eva Rich picks her way among the pale gray girders and crematory arches, recalling the Nazi death camp and the ghetto purge that devoured her family and her youth such a long, long lifetime ago."So big, so huge, this building," she murmurs, her moist eyes taking in the giant skylight, its glass panes skewed and jagged as a chain-saw blade. "But right now it seems so small; it can never hold all of the misery."Already a brooding symbolism pervades the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, still six months from completion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 16, 2001
In movies, symbolism is easy; reality is hard; and symbols that are imbued with and illuminate reality are close to miraculous. When they were collaborating on the screenplay to The African Queen, the great critic and screenwriter James Agee told John Huston that Bogart and Hepburn's trip up the river could symbolize the act of love. Huston responded: "Oh, Christ, Jim, tell me something I can understand. This isn't like a novel. This is a screenplay. You've got to demonstrate everything, Jim. People on the screen [are already]
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | June 13, 2007
FOODMUSEUM.COM This eclectic online "museum" has information about topics as varied as school-lunch reform, France's historic salt industry and the symbolism of cake. There's also a blog with food-related news.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, Yvonne Wenger and Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
For nearly two centuries, Baltimore has been a railroad town, its great eastern port and once-thriving industries sustained by the network of freight lines running inland. That legacy, however, ebbed over time as the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was subsumed and its successor, CSX Transportation, moved south. Residents and local officials say the city's prominence in the railroad industry crumbled alongside the aging tunnels, overpasses and tracks that convey trains through city neighborhoods every day. The relationship between Baltimoreans and the railroad has frayed as well.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Tourists never come to see the cherry blossoms in West Baltimore, in the heart of what local residents warmly refer to as "the hood. " But they could, as far as Marvin "Doc" Cheatham is concerned. "We could have people ride through, neighbors selling hot dogs and hamburgers, saying, 'You don't got to go to Washington for cherry blossoms!'" Cheatham said this weekend from his front steps in the 1600 block of Appleton St. The block has about 40 occupied homes, 11 boarded-up vacants, and about a dozen cherry trees - planted by the city in the 1970s, as Cheatham recalls.
NEWS
By James Westwater | March 4, 2014
In our religious relationships there are frequently rituals and symbols: the sign of the cross, prayers, special embraces, a kiss. These customs are expressions of our humility, love and heartfelt needs. Many people who seldom go to church make a concerted effort to get there on Ash Wednesday to receive ashes. It is an annual ritual. As a boy, I recall churches opening at 6 a.m., so people could get their ashes before work. It seemed a curious thing to do, accepting a cross of ash on one's forehead - a symbol of our mortality and repentance.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
Severe weather can tell you a lot about people. Sometimes it brings out the good and sometimes the bad. I lived in New Orleans before moving to Baltimore and have been through a hurricane. I grew up in Buffalo, N.Y., and have managed many a snow storm. I've seen neighbors sharing supplies, drinks and friendliness in times of uncertainty. In difficult times most people offer help to neighbors and strangers. Yet to my mind, in Baltimore we hold to a symbol of exactly the opposite: The chair in the shoveled parking spot.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2013
This will be the third year in a row that Baltimore tries to get its head wrapped around an IndyCar race on our downtown boulevards, and the question is: Are we there yet? Is Baltimore now a Grand Prix town, and is that even something we want? The world is divided between people who like cilantro and people who hate cilantro, those who like bluegrass music and those who like music, those who fancy motor sports and those who cannot stand them. (I've seen speedboat races, air races, stock cars, funny cars, classic dragsters, Le Mans series, Formula One, and my favorite motor sport remains demolition derby.)
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Hundreds of protesters marched through downtown Baltimore on Monday evening to express outrage over the Trayvon Martin case but also to use the teen as a symbol of systemic issues facing the black community in the city and around the country. Several hundred protesters gathered in McKeldin Square next to the Inner Harbor before marching seven blocks to City Hall, shutting down streets during rush-hour traffic. It was the second day of protests in Baltimore after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in Martin's death after a trial that captured national attention.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | August 12, 1994
London -- The secrets of Freemasonry used to be exposed in little blue books published by obsessive authors writing from obscure corners of Kansas.The brethren once guarded the mysteries so closely that the penalty for revealing a secret was to have one's tongue "torn out by the root and buried in the sand of the sea at low water mark." Whether any tongues ever vanished beneath the surf is problematic, but the secrets prevailed.The Freemasons here are more relaxed these days. They invite you into the inner chamber of their Grand Lodge, where they're likely to show you the worn brocade work on the arms of the throne of Grand and Worshipful Masters.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 22, 1994
More than 41,000 fans came to Memorial Stadium for a CFL game Saturday night. Not that you could tell for most of the evening. The game was a dud. The home team was flat. With little to cheer about until a late rally that fell short, the fans were quiet.No matter how sleepy they seemed, however, they faithfully snapped awake when offered a chance to play their favorite game. The name game.Again and again throughout the evening, the public address announcer would bark: "First down, your Baltimore CFL . . . . "Again and again, the fans would roar: "Colts!"
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Baltimore's speed cameras are off-line for the second time this year after officials found faults with some of the tickets issued by the city's new camera system vendor. Officials say they will void or refund nearly 600 erroneous tickets. We would be inclined to compliment the city for how seriously it is taking the responsibility to eliminate all errors from the program if there weren't something so odd about this latest twist in the Baltimore speed camera saga. According to a news release issued by the Department of Transportation late Tuesday afternoon, the city decided to shut the cameras down after finding some "clerical mistakes" involving the payment options listed on tickets and the speed limit near one camera on the Alameda.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
Given how low the expectations were for President Barack Obama's highly publicized trip to the Middle East, it may not be saying much to declare that he exceeded them. But given the precarious state of Israeli-Palestinian relations, it would also be easy to underappreciate just how crucial his efforts may prove to be in the long quest for a lasting peace in the Middle East. When Mr. Obama arrived in Israel, he faced many who believed that the possibility of a two-state solution was on its death bed, if not gone already.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.