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By Michael Stroh and By Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
Darwin's Blind Spot: Evolution Beyond Natural Selection, by Frank Ryan. Houghton Mifflin, 310 pages, $25. There is a species of hermit crab that scuttles around with a pink anemone atop its shell. If an octopus or other predator approaches the crab, the anemone jabs it with a poisoned tentacle, scaring off the would-be assailant. In return for playing bodyguard, the anemone is permitted to piggyback and feast on the crab's leftovers and excrement. One can debate the equity of this deal.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | August 14, 2012
It is not too much of a stretch to say the National Rifle Association profits from mass killings like the slaughter at the theater in Aurora, Colo., and the killings at the Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis. The NRA is, after all, a fundraising machine that runs on fear and a sense of crisis, even when the fear is false and the crisis manufactured. A former Republican lawmaker has made public a four-page fundraising letter from the NRA's executive vice-president, Wayne LaPierre, that was sent out to gun enthusiasts just three days after a young man styling himself as the Joker turned a showing of the new Batman movie into a bloody massacre.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 1992
Wang expects worse lossWang Laboratories Inc. said yesterday that the financial loss from its last fiscal year could be worse than originally stated due to the extra costs of shrinking the company in bankruptcy court. The computer company, based in Lowell, Mass., said it expects to restate the results for the fiscal year that ended June 30 to account for additional restructuring charges.The company said "these charges could be substantial and result in a sizable loss for the prior fiscal year."
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
It almost seems as if Jeff Holland can stand in the gallery of his museum for hours, just gazing at the pictures on its rugged walls. It isn't that he has nothing better to do. As executive director of the Annapolis Maritime Museum in Eastport, he's responsible for finding funds, planning events, installing materials and in general keeping the museum about life in and around the Chesapeake moving "full steam ahead," as he puts it in the museum's latest...
FEATURES
By SUSAN DEITZ | December 6, 1992
Q: Your reader's question, "Why don't men respect and want a good woman enough to ask her to marry?" has really pushed one of my buttons!For me, the answer is both simple and complicated (just like life). I am 30 and divorced and the single most important thing I have learned about myself is that I must be responsible for myself. I simply cannot base my well-being on anything but my own abilities.One of the current friendships I have is the most wonderful relationship I have ever had. And I believe that any attempt to confine or even define its working parameters would only hinder and ultimately destroy it. Why would I want to do that?
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 19, 1993
Hard rock musicians talk all the time about how much they love their fans, but few ever make that affection as obvious as Van Halen did at the Merriweather Post Pavilion Saturday.It wasn't just the way singer Sammy Hagar went on about how great the crowd was, either, for the band's enthusiasm was audible in every note, from the set-opening "Mine All Mine" to the encore rendition of "Rockin' In the Free World."True, there weren't many surprises in the set list. Van Halen is currently touring behind its live album, "Right Here, Right Now," and as such turned in what was essentially a greatest-hits show.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 21, 2007
In a contest that was a test of endurance as much as spelling prowess, it was a relatively easy word, symbiosis, that clinched a trip to the Scripps National Spelling Bee for Heather desJardins-Park. Three hours after the Howard County Library Spelling Bee had begun, seven contestants remained on the Howard High School stage at 10 p.m., having survived nine rounds. The final 30 minutes of Friday night's competition came down to two spellers - Heather desJardins-Park, an eighth-grader at Lime Kiln Middle School, and Harsha Neerchal, a seventh-grader at Burleigh Manor Middle School.
NEWS
July 1, 1997
NO ONE SHOULD DOUBT that China will stick to its formula of "one country, two systems," for Hong Kong. What must be doubted is the slogan's meaning as the years unfold.Hong Kong was the entrepot by which Chinese manufactures entered world trade and remains a huge port. It is the window by which overseas Chinese capital and management skills pour into China to employ its labor. And while Hong Kong's symbiosis with neighboring Guangdong Province is famous, it generates most foreign investment in all of China.
NEWS
November 15, 2005
In the summer of 1990, this newspaper ran a front-page story alerting readers that the U.S. trade deficit with China was rising fast. It had increased by 300 percent in the previous two years, and by the end of that year, China was poised to overtake Taiwan as America's second-largest deficit trading partner - next to Japan. What a difference 15 years make - a difference worth pondering as President Bush visits Beijing this week. In 1990, the growing Chinese trade surplus with the United States made news because for the first time it was about to top $10 billion a year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2003
Some people can pick up dropped socks with their toes, but they can't stretch their feet all the way to the basement to get them. Scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego are studying a clam that can. At least, it can extend its foot up to 30 times the length of its shell into the mud. Researchers believe it's the most extreme case of animal structure elongation ever discovered. The clams stretch their feet into the muck to gather food - not for themselves but to nourish bacteria that grow in their gills.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 25, 2010
If Democrats and Republicans could work as well together as Anguilla rostrata and Elliptio complanata do, we'd probably have a better country. They don't have to like each other much — Anguilla and Elliptio aren't especially fond of each other, either — but if the leaders of the two major parties could at least strive toward the kind of symbiosis found in nature, we might see some progress on all sorts of issues confronting the nation....
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 21, 2007
In a contest that was a test of endurance as much as spelling prowess, it was a relatively easy word, symbiosis, that clinched a trip to the Scripps National Spelling Bee for Heather desJardins-Park. Three hours after the Howard County Library Spelling Bee had begun, seven contestants remained on the Howard High School stage at 10 p.m., having survived nine rounds. The final 30 minutes of Friday night's competition came down to two spellers - Heather desJardins-Park, an eighth-grader at Lime Kiln Middle School, and Harsha Neerchal, a seventh-grader at Burleigh Manor Middle School.
NEWS
November 15, 2005
In the summer of 1990, this newspaper ran a front-page story alerting readers that the U.S. trade deficit with China was rising fast. It had increased by 300 percent in the previous two years, and by the end of that year, China was poised to overtake Taiwan as America's second-largest deficit trading partner - next to Japan. What a difference 15 years make - a difference worth pondering as President Bush visits Beijing this week. In 1990, the growing Chinese trade surplus with the United States made news because for the first time it was about to top $10 billion a year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2003
Some people can pick up dropped socks with their toes, but they can't stretch their feet all the way to the basement to get them. Scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego are studying a clam that can. At least, it can extend its foot up to 30 times the length of its shell into the mud. Researchers believe it's the most extreme case of animal structure elongation ever discovered. The clams stretch their feet into the muck to gather food - not for themselves but to nourish bacteria that grow in their gills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and By Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
Darwin's Blind Spot: Evolution Beyond Natural Selection, by Frank Ryan. Houghton Mifflin, 310 pages, $25. There is a species of hermit crab that scuttles around with a pink anemone atop its shell. If an octopus or other predator approaches the crab, the anemone jabs it with a poisoned tentacle, scaring off the would-be assailant. In return for playing bodyguard, the anemone is permitted to piggyback and feast on the crab's leftovers and excrement. One can debate the equity of this deal.
NEWS
July 1, 1997
NO ONE SHOULD DOUBT that China will stick to its formula of "one country, two systems," for Hong Kong. What must be doubted is the slogan's meaning as the years unfold.Hong Kong was the entrepot by which Chinese manufactures entered world trade and remains a huge port. It is the window by which overseas Chinese capital and management skills pour into China to employ its labor. And while Hong Kong's symbiosis with neighboring Guangdong Province is famous, it generates most foreign investment in all of China.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 17, 1992
Bill Clinton's election-night acceptance speech extolled ''anew spirit of community'' in which ''our destiny is bound up in the destiny of every American.''He exhorted his fellow Americans ''to be interested not just in getting, but in giving; not just in placing blame, but in assuming responsibility; not just in looking out for yourselves, but in looking out for others too.''Are the makings of distinguished leadership here? Could Mr. Clinton be ready to back tangible sacrifices that would make a real difference in American life?
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- One of the little conceits of Washington reporters is that only they are equipped to ask a president of the United States the right questions to force him to level with the American people. President Clinton's first experiment with a televised "town meeting" from suburban Detroit makes it clear that is a hollow claim.Although there were some occasions when Clinton got away with vague generalizations, largely because the format didn't allow for full pursuit of the quarry, the questioners confronted him with all the issues that have been at the core of national debate since he took office three weeks ago -- taxes, Haiti, health insurance, Bosnia, trade, gun control and the appointment of an attorney general among them.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 19, 1993
Hard rock musicians talk all the time about how much they love their fans, but few ever make that affection as obvious as Van Halen did at the Merriweather Post Pavilion Saturday.It wasn't just the way singer Sammy Hagar went on about how great the crowd was, either, for the band's enthusiasm was audible in every note, from the set-opening "Mine All Mine" to the encore rendition of "Rockin' In the Free World."True, there weren't many surprises in the set list. Van Halen is currently touring behind its live album, "Right Here, Right Now," and as such turned in what was essentially a greatest-hits show.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- One of the little conceits of Washington reporters is that only they are equipped to ask a president of the United States the right questions to force him to level with the American people. President Clinton's first experiment with a televised "town meeting" from suburban Detroit makes it clear that is a hollow claim.Although there were some occasions when Clinton got away with vague generalizations, largely because the format didn't allow for full pursuit of the quarry, the questioners confronted him with all the issues that have been at the core of national debate since he took office three weeks ago -- taxes, Haiti, health insurance, Bosnia, trade, gun control and the appointment of an attorney general among them.
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