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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 1998
LONDON -- Ted Hughes was a poet with passion and a past. Blessed with talent and stalked by controversy, he illuminated an unforgiving natural world with his brawny prose.Yet his life, career and reputation were forever linked to his stormy marriage to his first wife, Sylvia Plath, the doomed poet turned feminist icon, who committed suicide.Even with yesterday's announcement that Hughes, 68, died Wednesday after an 18-month struggle with cancer, his admirers expressed concern that past tragedy would again overshadow the mountain of work created by Britain's Poet Laureate.
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December 31, 2004
Donald Hollowell, 87, a leading civil rights attorney who once helped free the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. from prison and worked to desegregate Atlanta's public schools, died there Monday of heart failure. Mr. Hollowell also was credited with helping desegregate the University of Georgia. Atlanta named a road after him in 1998. In the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. Hollowell was one of the lead lawyers in the desegregation of Atlanta schools. He represented Dr. King in 1960 after the civil rights leader was jailed on a traffic charge.
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By Stephen Margulies | September 15, 1991
ANNE SEXTON: A BIOGRAPHY. Diane Wood Middlebrook. Houghton Mifflin. 488 pages. $24.95. Anne Sexton belonged to a generation of middle-class American poets who knew the way around their favorite mental hospital blindfolded. Born before World War II, they were torn between two eras. Neither hippies nor beatniks -- strongly influenced by traditional American values -- they ruthlessly punished themselves for their ecstatic raids into freedoms we now take for granted. Suicide was this generation's drug of preference (though, in the lethal innocence of the '50s, their doctors prescribed many other drugs involving slower death)
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By Victoria Brownworth and By Victoria Brownworth,Special to the Sun | February 2, 2003
Wintering: A Novel of Sylvia Plath, by Kate Moses. St. Martin's Press. 272 pages. $23.95. In the 40 years since her suicide at 31, poet Sylvia Plath has, like Marilyn Monroe, become an iconic, even mythic figure. Yet the fascination with her stems not so much from her extraordinary poetry as from the voyeuristic lust nurtured by our own darkest need to peel away the scars that cover wounded lives. Certainly Plath can be triaged among the deeply wounded, and Kate Moses' book details the egregiousness of those thousand cuts with an intensity to match that which led Plath to put her head in the oven during a dreadful London winter in 1962, leaving her two young children motherless.
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By Encyclopedia of Literature | September 13, 1998
Sylvia Plath(1932-1963)A poet who wrote using intense imagery and focus, Plath was little known at the time of her death by suicide, but became well-recognized posthumously.She drew from her own experiences to write her only novel, "The Bell Jar." Appearing first under a pseudonym, the book describes the emotional breakdown, attempted suicide and eventual recovery of a college girl.The Collection of Poems, which includes many previously unpublished poems, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1981.
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By Dorthea Strauss and Dorthea Strauss,special to the sun | April 5, 1998
"Bitch," by Elizabeth Wurtzel. Doubleday. 400 pages. $23.95.I take "Bitch" by Elizabeth Wurtzel to be a rebuttal of "The Rules": a shriek, protesting the hypocritical, no-saying, lady-like directives for snaring a man found in that bestseller by two triumphant housewives.Ms. Wurtzel's treatise presents an exhaustive and exhausting cast of "bitches" (in heat, of course), whose quests for power depend, largely, on beauty and sexual dynamism. The list is headed by the biblical seductress Delilah and proceeds as far as Princess Diana.
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By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1994
We think of our major cities as metropolises -- New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle -- and by that measure, Boston doesn't begin to qualify. It is relatively small by population and economic clout. It has bounce but not much bounce-back; and the booms and rebirths it manages, from time to time, dissipate as inevitably as early season Red Sox leads.Yet Boston has an undeniable hold on the nation's imagination. There is history's nostalgia, of course; there are the universities and the tidal vigor of tens of thousands of students washing in from all over the world and washing out again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria Brownworth and By Victoria Brownworth,Special to the Sun | February 2, 2003
Wintering: A Novel of Sylvia Plath, by Kate Moses. St. Martin's Press. 272 pages. $23.95. In the 40 years since her suicide at 31, poet Sylvia Plath has, like Marilyn Monroe, become an iconic, even mythic figure. Yet the fascination with her stems not so much from her extraordinary poetry as from the voyeuristic lust nurtured by our own darkest need to peel away the scars that cover wounded lives. Certainly Plath can be triaged among the deeply wounded, and Kate Moses' book details the egregiousness of those thousand cuts with an intensity to match that which led Plath to put her head in the oven during a dreadful London winter in 1962, leaving her two young children motherless.
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By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | February 14, 1995
Acclaimed poet Linda Pastan refers to one of her poems in "An Early Afterlife" to explain why she writes:. . . When the word calls, you followeven in the kitchen proofing yeast for bread. . . .For whether or not you want it,whether or not you're ready, you mustgrasp it now in your good right handas if it alone can save you.As Ms. Pastan sees it, the word has called her many times. "An Early Afterlife," just published, is her ninth book of poetry. It will be showcased at 8 tonight at a Folger Shakespeare Library reading with Robert Creeley, another highly regarded poet.
NEWS
December 31, 2004
Donald Hollowell, 87, a leading civil rights attorney who once helped free the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. from prison and worked to desegregate Atlanta's public schools, died there Monday of heart failure. Mr. Hollowell also was credited with helping desegregate the University of Georgia. Atlanta named a road after him in 1998. In the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. Hollowell was one of the lead lawyers in the desegregation of Atlanta schools. He represented Dr. King in 1960 after the civil rights leader was jailed on a traffic charge.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 1998
LONDON -- Ted Hughes was a poet with passion and a past. Blessed with talent and stalked by controversy, he illuminated an unforgiving natural world with his brawny prose.Yet his life, career and reputation were forever linked to his stormy marriage to his first wife, Sylvia Plath, the doomed poet turned feminist icon, who committed suicide.Even with yesterday's announcement that Hughes, 68, died Wednesday after an 18-month struggle with cancer, his admirers expressed concern that past tragedy would again overshadow the mountain of work created by Britain's Poet Laureate.
FEATURES
By Encyclopedia of Literature | September 13, 1998
Sylvia Plath(1932-1963)A poet who wrote using intense imagery and focus, Plath was little known at the time of her death by suicide, but became well-recognized posthumously.She drew from her own experiences to write her only novel, "The Bell Jar." Appearing first under a pseudonym, the book describes the emotional breakdown, attempted suicide and eventual recovery of a college girl.The Collection of Poems, which includes many previously unpublished poems, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1981.
NEWS
By Dorthea Strauss and Dorthea Strauss,special to the sun | April 5, 1998
"Bitch," by Elizabeth Wurtzel. Doubleday. 400 pages. $23.95.I take "Bitch" by Elizabeth Wurtzel to be a rebuttal of "The Rules": a shriek, protesting the hypocritical, no-saying, lady-like directives for snaring a man found in that bestseller by two triumphant housewives.Ms. Wurtzel's treatise presents an exhaustive and exhausting cast of "bitches" (in heat, of course), whose quests for power depend, largely, on beauty and sexual dynamism. The list is headed by the biblical seductress Delilah and proceeds as far as Princess Diana.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | February 14, 1995
Acclaimed poet Linda Pastan refers to one of her poems in "An Early Afterlife" to explain why she writes:. . . When the word calls, you followeven in the kitchen proofing yeast for bread. . . .For whether or not you want it,whether or not you're ready, you mustgrasp it now in your good right handas if it alone can save you.As Ms. Pastan sees it, the word has called her many times. "An Early Afterlife," just published, is her ninth book of poetry. It will be showcased at 8 tonight at a Folger Shakespeare Library reading with Robert Creeley, another highly regarded poet.
FEATURES
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1994
We think of our major cities as metropolises -- New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle -- and by that measure, Boston doesn't begin to qualify. It is relatively small by population and economic clout. It has bounce but not much bounce-back; and the booms and rebirths it manages, from time to time, dissipate as inevitably as early season Red Sox leads.Yet Boston has an undeniable hold on the nation's imagination. There is history's nostalgia, of course; there are the universities and the tidal vigor of tens of thousands of students washing in from all over the world and washing out again.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | September 15, 1991
ANNE SEXTON: A BIOGRAPHY. Diane Wood Middlebrook. Houghton Mifflin. 488 pages. $24.95. Anne Sexton belonged to a generation of middle-class American poets who knew the way around their favorite mental hospital blindfolded. Born before World War II, they were torn between two eras. Neither hippies nor beatniks -- strongly influenced by traditional American values -- they ruthlessly punished themselves for their ecstatic raids into freedoms we now take for granted. Suicide was this generation's drug of preference (though, in the lethal innocence of the '50s, their doctors prescribed many other drugs involving slower death)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2003
"I'm no stranger to suffering. My suffering has come from external circumstances in my life and hers from internal." -- Gwyneth Paltrow, on playing Sylvia Plath, to Associated Press Television News
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By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Flavorwire has put together an interesting gallery of photos of authors in their young, pre-fame days. Some drip with irony: a smiling Sylvia Plath, and Jack Kerouac (in a tie!) at Horace Mann. Others are disarmingly cute: Samuel Beckett on his high school cricket team, Madeleine L'Engle in her Smith College yearbook, and J.D. Salinger at military school. One of the yearbook entries -- for Maurice Sendak -- is prescient. It reads: Your delightful drawings make us all gay/A famous arftist you'll be someday. 
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