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By Ken Rosenthal | June 28, 1999
CARY, N.C. -- He's the cyclist who got sent to Siberia. But for Syd Lea, a defending Special Olympics World Games gold medalist at the age of 14, international travel is part of the program.His mother, Tracy, is chairwoman of the U.S. Cycling Federation. His father, Robert, is a seven-time national masters champion. His brother, Bobby, 15, is one of the nation's top junior riders.Syd had no choice but to get on a bike, and that's what he did when he was 3, one year after his parents learned that he was mentally retarded.
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By Steve Jones | July 22, 2011
From Syd Lea's home in Taneytown, the Pennsylvania line is less than two miles away. When the accomplished cyclist ventures outside from his home gymnasium, he often crosses the Mason-Dixon Line as part of his training regimen. That's not the only boundary that he has crossed during his cycling career. The 26-year old from northwestern Carroll County has traversed the world several times on the way to becoming the premier cyclist among American Special Olympians. Lea was a top winner for Team USA in the recent Special Olympics World Summer Games in Athens, Greece, earning three of the team's 10 gold medals in the international competition.
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NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
ONE TANEYTOWN family took its favorite sport and used it to honor the victims of last year's terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center in New York. Tracy and Rob Lea and their son Syd, 17, decided a good way to remember the victims was to ride from Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan to the Pentagon. The 270-mile trip was sponsored by World T.E.A.M. Sports, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to "bring individuals with and without disabilities together to undertake unique athletic events throughout the world to encourage, promote and develop opportunities in sports for all people."
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | July 22, 2011
From Syd Lea's home in Taneytown, the Pennsylvania line is less than two miles away. When the accomplished cyclist ventures outside from his home gymnasium, he often crosses the Mason-Dixon Line as part of his training regimen. That's not the only boundary that he has crossed during his cycling career. The 26-year old from northwestern Carroll County has traversed the world several times on the way to becoming the premier cyclist among American Special Olympians. Lea was a top winner for Team USA in the recent Special Olympics World Summer Games in Athens, Greece, earning three of the team's 10 gold medals in the international competition.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
Orioles vice president for baseball operations Syd Thrift denied a report yesterday that he criticized manager Mike Hargrove and the coaching staff to an opposing general manager, and Hargrove called the matter "water under the bridge." The issue surfaced Friday night when Orioles broadcaster and Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer alluded to the incident during a 30-minute interview with WBAL Radio's Steve Melewski. "You know and I know how hard the coaching staff works," Palmer told the station.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | April 15, 2001
UP -- Willis Roberts Wednesday's four shutout innings heated up an internal debate over whether he is the closer of the near future. As a Syd Thrift find, the former minor-league free agent with "Tom Seaver stuff" won't lack for opportunity. DOWN -- Roster inflexibility With so many "kids," how can the Orioles be so set? They're the only major-league team without a reserve middle infielder. And is No. 3 catcher and Thrift signee Greg Myers really worth an 11-man pitching staff? DOWN -- Jose Mercedes Thursday's finger-thrusting, cooler-kicking exit at Fenway made great "SportsCenter" footage but didn't do much for the staff image.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2001
With speculation about his job status growing as the club's payroll is reduced, Orioles vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift has received further assurances from majority owner Peter Angelos that he will remain in his present capacity at least through the 2002 season. Rumors of Angelos' diminished trust in Thrift, who took over for disposed general manager Frank Wren after the 1999 season, began to circulate during last week's winter meetings in Boston. The Orioles failed to make a significant trade or free-agent signing, with their only acquisition being journeyman pitcher Chris Brock from Philadelphia.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
In a surprise move, the Orioles have picked Syd Thrift, a baseball executive with a colorful and controversial past, as director of player development, club sources said yesterday.Thrift, 65, a veteran baseball man who has worked in the front offices of five major-league clubs, functioning as general manager of two, will direct the Orioles' minor-league farm system. Thrift signed a one-year contract, the sources said.In the minor-league post, Thrift takes over for Doug Melvin, who left the Orioles this month to become general manager of the Texas Rangers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 1, 2000
Dex thinks he knows everything about women. The fool. For even if Dex is right (and the signs suggest he may be onto something), what will that knowledge get him? The answer, according to this refreshingly smart and understated romantic comedy from first-time director Jenniphr Goodman, is a lot of dates, a good deal of sex and a big zero when it comes to relationships. Ten years removed from his days as a Big Man on Campus, Dex (Donal Logue) has put on a few dozen pounds and gotten a job teaching kindergarten, but otherwise has changed little.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 11, 1999
Those old Soviet elections were more legitimate than the Gold Glove voting. Rafael "The Phantom" Palmeiro played 28 games at first base last season. Will "Iron Horse" Clark more than doubled that total.But don't tell that to the American League managers and coaches who viewed Palmeiro's 28 games as genius not seen since Mozart, and voted him his third straight Gold Glove.Never again can Palmeiro complain about a lack of recognition. He conceded that Texas teammate Lee Stevens was more deserving, and how about the New York Yankees' Tino Martinez, who only made seven errors in 151 starts?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | September 20, 2006
Tim Donner and his radio partner, Syd Thrift, were walking into the All-Star FanFest in Pittsburgh in July when they were stopped by a memorabilia dealer. "There's Syd Thrift," the vendor bellowed. "The man who invented baseball." "It could have been about his age, his experience, his success or his knowledge," said Donner, who spent Sunday afternoons each of the past four seasons hosting the syndicated radio show, Talkin' Baseball, with Thrift. "Or all of it." Thrift, whose baseball career spanned almost 50 years, including three seasons running the Orioles, died Monday night in Milford, Del., hours after having his second knee replacement surgery in two years.
NEWS
February 23, 2003
On February 21, 2003, SYD G. BALDER; (nee Garfunkel); beloved wife of the late Charles Balder; loving mother of John M. Balder, Sr., Gloria Katzenberg and the late Alton P. (Jim) Balder; devoted mother-in-law of Ruth P. Balder and Herbert M. Katzenberg; dear sister of Milton Garfunkel and the late Mike, Larry, and Mack Garfunkel; loving grandmother of Susan B. Katzenberg, Diane K. Braun, Douglas A. Balder, John M. Balder, Jr., Anne B., Grover, James F. Balder, Wendy E. Balder; loving great-grandmother of six, loving great-great-grandmother of one. Funeral Services will be Private at the convenience of the family.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
ONE TANEYTOWN family took its favorite sport and used it to honor the victims of last year's terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center in New York. Tracy and Rob Lea and their son Syd, 17, decided a good way to remember the victims was to ride from Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan to the Pentagon. The 270-mile trip was sponsored by World T.E.A.M. Sports, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to "bring individuals with and without disabilities together to undertake unique athletic events throughout the world to encourage, promote and develop opportunities in sports for all people."
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
Orioles vice president for baseball operations Syd Thrift denied a report yesterday that he criticized manager Mike Hargrove and the coaching staff to an opposing general manager, and Hargrove called the matter "water under the bridge." The issue surfaced Friday night when Orioles broadcaster and Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer alluded to the incident during a 30-minute interview with WBAL Radio's Steve Melewski. "You know and I know how hard the coaching staff works," Palmer told the station.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - With the Orioles reaching the midpoint of their season last night, club owner Peter Angelos told The Sun he is pleased with the team's progress and said sometimes maligned vice president for baseball operations Syd Thrift "is here to stay." In a wide-ranging half-hour phone interview from his Baltimore law offices, Angelos said he is still committed to adding players through free agency this off-season. And having declared .500 as the team's goal heading into the season, Angelos said he thinks the club can actually finish better than that.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | May 8, 2002
FEW WANT TO salute Syd Thrift because he has been criticized for so long. But he deserves some props. Go ahead, raise your champagne glass and give him a little toast. So far, the Orioles are a lot better than most of us thought they'd be. Instead of watching another rerun of Gilligan's Island or waiting for the Ravens' training camp to open in late July, there is some renewed interest in Syd's Baby Birds. Fans shouldn't get delirious and expect a championship, but at least some prospects are starting to emerge on the roster.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - With the Orioles reaching the midpoint of their season last night, club owner Peter Angelos told The Sun he is pleased with the team's progress and said sometimes maligned vice president for baseball operations Syd Thrift "is here to stay." In a wide-ranging half-hour phone interview from his Baltimore law offices, Angelos said he is still committed to adding players through free agency this off-season. And having declared .500 as the team's goal heading into the season, Angelos said he thinks the club can actually finish better than that.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | May 8, 2002
FEW WANT TO salute Syd Thrift because he has been criticized for so long. But he deserves some props. Go ahead, raise your champagne glass and give him a little toast. So far, the Orioles are a lot better than most of us thought they'd be. Instead of watching another rerun of Gilligan's Island or waiting for the Ravens' training camp to open in late July, there is some renewed interest in Syd's Baby Birds. Fans shouldn't get delirious and expect a championship, but at least some prospects are starting to emerge on the roster.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2001
With speculation about his job status growing as the club's payroll is reduced, Orioles vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift has received further assurances from majority owner Peter Angelos that he will remain in his present capacity at least through the 2002 season. Rumors of Angelos' diminished trust in Thrift, who took over for disposed general manager Frank Wren after the 1999 season, began to circulate during last week's winter meetings in Boston. The Orioles failed to make a significant trade or free-agent signing, with their only acquisition being journeyman pitcher Chris Brock from Philadelphia.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | April 15, 2001
UP -- Willis Roberts Wednesday's four shutout innings heated up an internal debate over whether he is the closer of the near future. As a Syd Thrift find, the former minor-league free agent with "Tom Seaver stuff" won't lack for opportunity. DOWN -- Roster inflexibility With so many "kids," how can the Orioles be so set? They're the only major-league team without a reserve middle infielder. And is No. 3 catcher and Thrift signee Greg Myers really worth an 11-man pitching staff? DOWN -- Jose Mercedes Thursday's finger-thrusting, cooler-kicking exit at Fenway made great "SportsCenter" footage but didn't do much for the staff image.
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