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By Nora Pouillon | January 29, 1998
CHEFS are known by the food they put on the table.But this year, many of my colleagues are joining me in a campaign to take something off the table. We're not going to serve any North Atlantic swordfish in our restaurants this year.Endangered fishThe swordfish is a magnificent creature. Using its enormous eyes and swordlike bill to hunt the ocean depths, it can grow to 1,200 pounds and live for more than 25 years. Unfortunately, these animals are now in serious trouble as the result of overfishing.
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NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 2, 2007
Recipe of the Week: Kabobs 52 Easy Recipes for Year-Round Grilling Lobel's Prime Time Grilling Recipes & Tips From America's #1 Butchers By Stanley, Leon, Evan, Mark and David Lobel Wiley / 2007 / $27.95 I've never been to the Lobels' famous Madison Avenue butcher shop, frequented by Manhattan's finest socialites and celebrities. But man, oh man, do I want to go now. The second edition of their cookbook includes 160 recipes, ranging from brisket, ribs, duck and pheasant to the perfect-sounding burgers.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 2, 1991
I am not the kind of guy who easily tosses fruit on fish.Fruit is something that should been seen at breakfast, or at a snack, or floating in a drink. But when the sun goes down and serious entree eating starts, the fruit, like children at a dinner party, should be out of sight.Yet the other night, I put melon hunks on my swordfish for supper and liked it.The motivating factor behind this culinary risk-taking was one that has been inspiring cooks for centuries, boredom.I was bored with the usual way I cook swordfish.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 17, 2007
2005 Cycles Gladiator Central Coast Chardonnay ($10) Finding a well-made California chardonnay around this price is always a welcome surprise. This wine shows an excellent balance of fruit and oak, with flavors of lemon, apple and nuts. It has a breezy acidity that often is characteristic of Central Coast fruit. We're not talking layers of complexity here, but it's a solid value at this price. Serve with salmon, swordfish or ham.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 10, 1994
There is nothing like a little swordfish with garlic and shallots for Sunday dinner. We had it on a recent Sunday night, not as a planned meal, but as a dinner by default.The planned meal was supposed to be ham. But it required a couple hours of cooking. It had been a sunny day, and there was yardwork to be done, time to be wasted. Before you could say "siesta's over," it was almost 6 o'clock, the ham was not stuffed and the tribe was getting hungry.I opened the fridge hoping to find ingredients for a dinner that could be reasonably quick but also rewarding.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 8, 2001
"Swordfish" is a souped-up roadster of a film, a relentless action flick that looks great and moves with more grace and speed than seems possible. Sure, it's a bunch of high-gloss candy, but who's going to think about that when there's so much excitement? Top-billed among the cast is John Travolta, obviously praying to the cinema gods that audiences will forget "Battlefield Earth." Here, he's the mysterious Gabriel Shear, and the avenging angel analogy is absolutely intentional. It takes most of the movie for his motives to become clear, even longer to figure out exactly who he is. But there's one thing we're sure of from the beginning: He's in control.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 1996
Nothing's better than swordfish on the grill -- and how about the entire meal done over fire?The entree in today's menu uses the simplest of ingredients, combined with some new grilling techniques that you'll want to keep in your repertoire.To save time cooking the corn, place the corn (husks on) in a microwave-safe plastic bag with about 1/4 cup of water. Close loosely, and then microwave on 100 percent power for 6 to 8 minutes. Remove from the bag and place the corn on the grill, over indirect heat for about the same length of time as the fish.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | April 8, 1992
Eating more seafood sounds like a great idea. It's delicious and makes a healthful change from steak and hamburger. But coming up with new ways to jazz it up can sometimes be the difficult part. This simple rendition of swordfish Santiago quickly transports the taste buds south of the border for a lively meal.Full-bodied swordfish can be considered the "steak" of the seafood realm and deserves a vibrant topping. Smoky grill flavors nicely complement the hardiness of the fish and the tangy lime sauce with which it is served, but broiling is a fine alternative.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 17, 2007
2005 Cycles Gladiator Central Coast Chardonnay ($10) Finding a well-made California chardonnay around this price is always a welcome surprise. This wine shows an excellent balance of fruit and oak, with flavors of lemon, apple and nuts. It has a breezy acidity that often is characteristic of Central Coast fruit. We're not talking layers of complexity here, but it's a solid value at this price. Serve with salmon, swordfish or ham.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | May 14, 2003
2000 Murphy-Goode Reserve Fume, Alexander Valley ($17). This excellent, mature sauvignon blanc is a wine of impressive body and complexity, enhanced by the judicious use of oak. It gives tasters a fascinating mix of flavors, with hints of melon, pear, nutmeg, chalk and lemon grass. This would be best served with full-flavored seafood such as salmon or swordfish -- especially if grilled.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE | June 3, 2006
My husband never met a steak he didn't like, but when it comes to fish, he falls into the picky-eaters category. When we were first married, I discovered that his curiosity was limited to shrimp and fried catfish - both staples of the South, where he grew up. But over the years I've introduced him to all manner of fish and seafood. What I've learned is that he likes just about any fish, as long as it has bold, vibrant flavorings. A perfect example of the type of seafood dish he now adores is Grilled Swordfish With Fresh Corn Salsa.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | March 8, 2006
You know tapas dining has become part of the American mainstream when a restaurant that specializes in the small plates comes to Baltimore's Inner Harbor. This weekend, La Tasca opens its doors at Harborplace's Pratt Street Pavilion, in a two-story space where a Tex-Mex eatery and barbecue restaurant had resided. It's the third U.S. addition for the United Kingdom-based chain. The other two La Tascas are in the District of Columbia and Arlington, Va. Christopher Novashinski, the managing partner of the Baltimore location, says each floor has its own patio, bar and seating for 400, a mixture of tables and chairs and benches with cushions.
NEWS
By WAYNE S. SMITH | December 27, 2005
The Treasury Department's recent announcement that it would not grant a license for a Cuban baseball team to participate in the World Baseball Classic planned for March was deeply disappointing but hardly a surprise. On the contrary, it was in keeping with the Bush administration's policy of trying to seal off all contact with the Caribbean island. Cuban academics are no longer given visas to come to the United States for conferences. American scholars find it increasingly difficult to carry out programs in Cuba because of tightening U.S. restrictions.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 22, 2004
Fennel is one of those overlooked vegetables. It's time to bring it out of its hiding place. This main dish pairs the mild, licorice-flavored plant with equally mild fish steaks and the salty deliciousness of parmesan cheese. Altogether, they create an elegant but quick meal. Then add a simple cherry-tomato salad, some bread and, for dessert, ice cream with a favorite topping from a jar. Butterscotch is my favorite. Tips Choose any mild fish, steaks or fillets, including halibut, snapper, trout or whitefish.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | October 22, 2003
2002 Trenel Fils Macon-Villages ($16). Tasters whose palates have been numbed by oaky California chardonnays might miss the subtle, elegant charms of this well-priced white Burgundy. There's a pleasant hint of apple -- not the green-apple flavor you so commonly find in chardonnay, but good red apple fresh off the tree. Other nuances include lemon, vanilla, nuts and minerals. Though this wine's not a heavyweight, it delivers these flavors with admirable intensity and length. This is very much a chef's wine -- crafted to complement food instead of competing with it. It would be best with seafood, particularly salmon or swordfish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
You've got one more option for dinner before or after a show at the Meyerhoff, Lyric or Theatre Project -- or any other time, for that matter. Center City Restaurant has just opened at 8 E. Preston St. You'll find a chic bar downstairs. A few steps up, and you have your choice between fine and casual dinner seating. "It's fine dining in a contemporary casual environment," says Paula Gardner, who owns the restaurant with husband Roger and son Adam. What she hopes that means is that Center City is a place that's sleek and sophisticated but still comfortably Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | June 28, 2000
1999 Carmen Sauvignon Blanc Reserve, Valle de Casablanca ($12). This exemplary sauvignon blanc is a splendid example of the improvement of Chile's white wines. It's a full-bodied, yeasty, dry wine with flavors of honey, herbs, figs and well-integrated oak. This complex, intense wine ranks with many of the finer California sauvignons blancs in this price range. It's a natural to serve with grilled salmon, swordfish or chicken.-
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Industrial fishing fleets have systematically stripped 90 percent of the giant tuna, swordfish, marlin and other big fish from the world's oceans, according to a new study that suggests that the virtual collapse of these stocks - such as happened to the cod off New England - is a distinct possibility. Fishing fleets are competing for the remnants of the biggest fish in the oceans, concludes a 10-year research project reported in today's issue of the science journal Nature. "Fishermen used to go out and catch these phenomenally big fish," said Ransom A. Myers, fisheries biologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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