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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: I'm glad I write for an American newspaper and not a British one, because with the controversial Luis Suarez causing the inevitable downfall of the disappointing English national team, I don't think I'd sleep until Tuesday. What's on tap: Italy vs. Costa Rica, noon, ESPN; Switzerland vs. France, 3 p.m., ESPN; Honduras vs. Ecuador, 6 p.m. ESPN. What you'll see: Get ready, North America. There might be days when there are better matches, or more important matches (USA Sunday!
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Luis Suarez r eally bit someone again , England bored us again, Greece went through on a soft late penalty and there might not be a more enjoyable team in the tournament than Colombia. What's on tap: Bosnia and Herzegovina vs. Iran, noon, ESPN2; Nigeria vs. Argentina, noon, ESPN; Ecuador vs. France, 4 p.m., ESPN; Honduras vs. Switzerland, 4 p.m., ESPN2. What you'll see:  In Group F, Argentina has already advanced and has a pretty straightforward path to the top spot in the group.
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NEWS
By Hans Knight and Hans Knight,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1997
"Hitler's Silent Partners," by Isabel Vincent. Morrow. 337 pages. $25.By now, few people who have scanned the news reports will be shocked to learn that Switzerland's "neutral role" role in World War II was less immaculate than the snows of Matterhorn. The evidence dug up by American Jewish and non-Jewish agencies in the past few years shows beyond reasonable doubt that between the early 1930s and the Allied victory, Switzerland or, more specifically, its secrecy-shrouded banks happily opened the vaults to billions of dollars worth of smelted gold and other assets the Nazis had stolen from their Jewish victims.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: I'm glad I write for an American newspaper and not a British one, because with the controversial Luis Suarez causing the inevitable downfall of the disappointing English national team, I don't think I'd sleep until Tuesday. What's on tap: Italy vs. Costa Rica, noon, ESPN; Switzerland vs. France, 3 p.m., ESPN; Honduras vs. Ecuador, 6 p.m. ESPN. What you'll see: Get ready, North America. There might be days when there are better matches, or more important matches (USA Sunday!
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The region's soccer fans will get their first peek at Spain and Switzerland today, but they aren't at a disadvantage in predicting an outcome. Loyal followers of the two teams are just as clueless as to how their heroes will perform.Will Spain trot out the team that played defending champion Germany even, or the one that blew a two-goal lead to South Korea in the last seven minutes? Will the Switzerland side that dominated Group A winner Romania show up, or the shaky group that allowed one-time favorite Colombia to regain some respect?
TRAVEL
By RICHARD C. ALBINS | January 15, 2006
No other country captures my soul quite like Switzerland. Its spectacular mountains, industrious people and idyllic villages are true wonders. In July, my wife and I traveled through Germany, Austria and Switzerland - for our second time in 10 years. I was still captivated. This time, we stayed in a small lodge in Emmetten, a village not far from Lucerne that is nestled on the side of a mountain. Although it had rained most of the night and was still raining when we got up, I was determined to venture out on my own before breakfast to get a picture of the town from a higher vantage point.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 8, 1993
Q: I'm looking to buy a Breitling watch, which I believe is Swiss.Is there a street in Switzerland or some other country where you can get Breitling watches cheaply?A: Breitling watches are indeed Swiss, but according to the president of the New York office of the Federation of the Swiss Watch Industry, Peter Laetsch, there is nowhere in Switzerland where watches are discounted.There are many places around the world where such discounts are given -- Hong Kong is a leading example. Some discounts may indeed be genuine, but there is always the risk that you may be buying a counterfeit product, a thriving business these days for high-priced items.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
ZURICH, Switzerland -- The sustaining myths of Switzerland suddenly seem as vulnerable as that apple on the young Tell's head.With greater intensity than at any time in a half-century, Switzerland's 7 million people are being pressed to look back at the moral ground on which their survival was built in the Second World War.A wave of public reports based on newly released United States and British intelligence documents chronicling unsavory Swiss dealings with...
NEWS
May 9, 1997
NOT CONTENT with its profits as chief international banker, money launderer and war material supplier to Nazi Germany, Switzerland clung to some of the looted gold stashed in its vaults in violation of an agreement with the U.S. after World War II. And Washington let Swiss negotiators dodge and wheedle and get away with it.The issuance of an exhaustive U.S. government report on the way "neutrality collided with morality" (with morality the unquestioned loser)...
NEWS
March 8, 2002
ITS TRADITION of neutrality is so strong that Switzerland isn't a member of the United Nations, even though Geneva has more U.N. offices than any other city outside of New York. This odd situation is finally about to end. In a close referendum last weekend, voters gave their government a go-ahead to apply for membership in the United Nations. For decades, Switzerland was perfectly content to play the part of good host. The country was willing to facilitate but not get involved. As a result, a bewildering array of global headquarters concentrated there, from the International Red Cross to the International Olympic Committee to the World Council of Churches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | April 15, 2013
Oh, Race, it's good to be back. I've missed you. And I've missed Phil's hat and Phil's Maori fishhook necklace, too! It's been two weeks, do you remember what happened? Africa? Speeding tickets? Fearless Friends got eliminated? Okay then, we're caught up, let's go to Switzerland. I've done very little international travel, but I did spend five days in Switzerland once between my junior and senior years of high school, so I'm totally an expert. Bern: city named after a bear. Interlaken: city named after the intersection of two lakes.
SPORTS
By Tom Schad, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Over a tall cup of coffee in Southeast Baltimore, Reed Whiting explains why and how he zips down frozen racetracks in the middle of cities, navigating jumps and turns while jostling with three other racers from around the world. He says he goes as fast as 40 miles per hour in front of more than 100,000 fans and a national television audience. He once canceled a week of appointments at work and booked an $880 overnight flight to Switzerland for the opportunity to compete. "It was a fun little ordeal," Whiting, 33, says.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
The average resident of Sandtown-Winchester can expect to live as long as a resident of Tajikistan, a former Soviet country still struggling to recover from a civil war.  But in tony Homeland, residents on average live as long as the Swiss, who have access to one of the world's best health care systems. A map created by students at The Park School depicts health disparities among the city's neighborhoods through countries in which residents have similar life expectancies.  For example, residents of the Seton Hill and Downtown neighborhoods have one of the shortest life expectancies, living, on average, just under 64 years.  The inhabitants of the totalitarian dictatorship in North Korea have similar life expectancies.  In contrast, those in the Roland Park area can expect to live on average more than 83 years, much like the denizens of The Most Serene Republic of San Marino, a tiny nation surrounded by Italy.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
It was with great interest that I read John Houser III's review of the Grand Cru in Belvedere Square ("Fine wines, fair small plates at Grand Cru," Nov. 3). Having been there several times myself, I wholeheartedly agree with his recommendations. There is however, a glaring error in his text, one which reflects poorly on our knowledge of regional cuisine and culture and only reinforces the belief that Americans have no clue when it comes to anything outside our borders. In this day and age of the Internet, how can it be possible to refer to raclette as a "Swedish classic"?
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
One of Lauren Morrell's earliest memories involves a family hike and a candy wrapper, which explains why the 16-year-old from Arnold is now the student representative to the Severn Riverkeeper group and why, the day she turned 15, she applied to become a Pangaea Young Explorer, trying to help a world-renowned adventurer named Mike Horn save the planet. Her passion began with those summer trips to the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York — and that little piece of trash. "We were on top of a mountain, and my father just picked it up and said, 'I just hate it when people litter the mountain,'" Morrell said last week at the Severn School in Severna Park, where she is a senior.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009
Cities with highest quality of life 1 Zurich, Switzerland 2 Geneva, Switzerland 3 Vancouver, British Columbia 4 Vienna, Austria 5 Auckland, New Zealand 6 Dusseldorf, Germany 7 Frankfurt, Germany 8 Munich, Germany 9 (tie) Bern, Switzerland, and Sydney, Australia From a survey by Mercer Human Resource Consulting Co. based on interviews with residents.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009
Cities with highest quality of life 1 Zurich, Switzerland 2 Geneva, Switzerland 3 Vancouver, British Columbia 4 Vienna, Austria 5 Auckland, New Zealand 6 Dusseldorf, Germany 7 Frankfurt, Germany 8 Munich, Germany 9 (tie) Bern, Switzerland, and Sydney, Australia From a survey by Mercer Human Resource Consulting Co. based on interviews with residents.
NEWS
By DAVID MORRIS | September 1, 1991
Switzerland celebrates Its 700th anniversary this year. At a historical moment when nations are being pulled apart by the centrifugal forces of ethnic and religious differences, the story of Switzerland is particularly instructive.On Aug. 1, 1291, in the Rutli Meadow on the shores of Lake Lucerne, the free peasants from the forest cantons of Schwyz (from which Switzerland was to gain its name), Uri and Unterwalden formed an "eternal alliance" of mutual defense. When the three communities successfully defended themselves against multiple attacks by the Hapsburg Empire, they emboldened surrounding communities to join their alliance.
TRAVEL
By Michael Workman and Michael Workman,michael.workman@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
As the bus lumbered up the snowy road, winding higher and higher toward the top of the mountain, my only thought was, "What has he gotten us into?" "He" was my uncle, and the bus was climbing to the top of Grosse Scheidegg, a 6,434-foot peak in Switzerland, where passengers would hop off the bus and sled back to the bottom of the icy road. At one point, the driver stopped to put chains on the tires before continuing to drive at a steep angle through blind twists and turns, making the idea of sledding back down (and possibly encountering the next bus)
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