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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | March 21, 2007
Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood Big Jim's Deli 410-752-2434 Hours --8 a.m.-7 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --6 minutes Here, we tried Big Jim's Reuben, $6.25. It had a few slices of warm, soft corned beef and some sauerkraut and Swiss cheese. Though it could have had more Swiss cheese, this sandwich was a good choice. Know of a good carryout place? Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Timothy Dean Burger is open. I couldn't find a website for the new burger joint, which is at the Boulevard at the Capital Center in Largo. But the opening is featured on the shopping center's website . There's a link to a menu , too. What's on the menu? Burgers, pizzas, a handful of sandwiches and sides. There's a TD Classic Burger with American cheese, bibb lettuce, tomatoes and red onion; a Timothy Blue Burger with organic blue cheese, maple bacon, lettuce and tomato.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | May 4, 1991
THE INTERNATIONAL EMPORIUM DELI103 E. Mount Royal Ave. Hours: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Closed Sundays. Call 234-0717.The "International" in International Emporium peeks through in erratic ways among the usual deli fare, the daily specials -- liver and onions on a recent afternoon -- and shelves of convenience )) foods. "Sopa de Espana," or Spanish soup, is a menu regular, as are spicy Caribbean pies and bean pie for dessert.But the deli's touted "international sandwiches" are such in name only.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
The Dish : The Rachel Is nothing sacred? Suburban House Restaurant at 1700 Reisterstown Road in Pikesville offers its Reuben with a choice of corned beef, pastrami, roasted turkey or brisket. Can it be a Reuben without corned beef? Shouldn't there be a name for kraut, Swiss, rye, 1,000 Island dressing and pastrami? The Rachel ($9.79) is essentially a Reuben with slaw instead of kraut. And it's called the Rachel. After the first sampling of Suburban's Rachel, I stopped caring what they call it. Their corned beef was sweet, pink, sliced thin and stacked high — not too lean and just firm enough to keep from crumbling.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens | March 11, 1992
Just in time for St. Patrick's Day, corned beef teams with cabbage, only this year "cabbage" means sauerkraut instead of the usual boiled fresh wedges. In this recipe, the timeless duet takes on a different form, a round meatloaf.Cooking meatloafs in a circle instead of the standard loaf shape helps the meat cook evenly and avoids the problem of overcooked corners. To see that the meat is evenly cooked throughout, insert a microwave meat thermometer near the center before cooking or an instant-read thermometer after cooking.
FEATURES
By Constance Snow and Constance Snow,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1997
NEW ORLEANS -- More than one tourist has fallen in love with those oddly named New Orleans sandwiches that can't be found anywhere else, so in honor of the 100,000 visitors expected for Super Bowl XXXI and nearly 140 million who'll be watching on TV this Sunday, we asked the experts how to reproduce some all-time favorites to feed the out-of-town fans.It may be called a po-boy, but the king of New Orleans sandwiches is a two-fisted feast on French bread, piled high and messy with anything from fried oysters to roast beef and gravy.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 3, 2002
My mother used to make a cheese souffle that she served at holiday dinners. I never wrote the recipe down, but I would like to try to make it. I think she used Swiss cheese. It's making me sad to keep reading about people who lost or never wrote down their family recipes. I will try to help on one condition: that regardless of whether you like this recipe as is or choose to tweak it to suit your taste, just write the darned thing down and pass it on. That way, some future slob like me won't get a letter from your grandkids asking for help.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
Requests for crustless quiche recipes come in fairly frequently. Diana Hamilton of Catonsville and Nancy Reigle of Towson sent us this one. The recipe is for Doris Bower of Perry Hall.Impossible Quiche1/2 pound bacon, cooked and crumbled1 cup shredded Swiss cheese1/2 cup chopped onion2 cups milk1 cup Bisquick4 eggs1/4 teaspoon salt1/8 teaspoon pepperSpread crumbled, cooked bacon on the bottom of a lightly greased ten-inch pie plate. Sprinkle cheese on top, then the onion. Beat milk, Bisquick, eggs, salt and pepper together one minute with a hand mixer until smooth.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
In ancient Rome, you knew you'd made it when Caesar handed you a laurel wreath.In modern Annapolis, you know you've arrived when Ted the deli guy gives you a salami sandwich once named after Louis L. Goldstein.Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens received one of the state capital's highest honors recently when Ted Levitt, owner of the legendary Chick and Ruth's Delly on Main Street, named a sandwich after her.Added to the restaurant's menu is No. 8: "The County Executive Janet S. Owens.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Tuna casserole and Julia Child? It's hard to believe America's favorite chef used canned foods, but Laura Shapiro writes in her new biography, Julia Child, that Child created just such a recipe while working for S.S. Pierce, a Boston canned food company. She made a version "worthy of any dinner table she knew, including her own," Shapiro writes. Using today's more healthful canned soups and microwaveable brown rice, I've adapted the recipe to fit our busy lives. Comfort food needs comfort wine - in this case, a soft, fruity shiraz.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
Cheryl Woodward from Baltimore was searching for a recipe she had misplaced for making stuffed pork loin. She does not remember the exact ingredients but she does recall that it had Swiss cheese and rosemary in the stuffing. Josie Englund from Wilmington, DE, sent in a recipe she thinks might be close to Woodward's original. She says that this stuffed pork tenderloin is one of those dishes that is relatively easy to prepare, tastes delicious and looks impressive. She says she makes it frequently for company.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2009
Ann Paszkiewicz of Fallston was looking for a recipe for a rice-cheese bake that she said was probably at least 35 years old. Mary Rollins of Martinsburg, W.Va., sent in this recipe from an old cookbook called Recipes Out of This World by the Women of St. Agnes Catholic Church in Charleston, W.Va. Recipe request Patti Kress of Osprey, Fla., said that while visiting Baltimore some years ago she had a wonderful Asiago cheese spread that she purchased at the cheese store in the Cross Street Market in South Baltimore.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Tuna casserole and Julia Child? It's hard to believe America's favorite chef used canned foods, but Laura Shapiro writes in her new biography, Julia Child, that Child created just such a recipe while working for S.S. Pierce, a Boston canned food company. She made a version "worthy of any dinner table she knew, including her own," Shapiro writes. Using today's more healthful canned soups and microwaveable brown rice, I've adapted the recipe to fit our busy lives. Comfort food needs comfort wine - in this case, a soft, fruity shiraz.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | March 21, 2007
Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood Big Jim's Deli 410-752-2434 Hours --8 a.m.-7 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --6 minutes Here, we tried Big Jim's Reuben, $6.25. It had a few slices of warm, soft corned beef and some sauerkraut and Swiss cheese. Though it could have had more Swiss cheese, this sandwich was a good choice. Know of a good carryout place? Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
NEWS
January 3, 2007
Anybody who flew over the holidays - as well as during the last few months - is all too well-acquainted with the rule that carry-on liquids must be in 3-ounce or smaller containers. So, what was with some travelers who entered their plane at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport carrying two bottles of wine? Believe it or not, it's a new perk, courtesy of an airport restaurant, Baci Bar & Grill. The restaurateur behind the program believes it may be a first in the country.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 27, 2006
Considering the success of Roland Park's daytime-only restaurant, Miss Shirley's, it should come as no surprise that another eatery along those lines has popped up in Pikesville. First Watch - which calls itself the largest privately owned daytime-only restaurant chain in the country - opened its doors on Reisterstown Road a little over two weeks ago. The Florida-based chain boasts 67 such restaurants in 11 states. This is the first in Maryland. Hmmm. Daytime only. Breakfast, brunch and lunch offered the whole time.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | September 15, 1999
Sandwich pairs pears with ham, cheeseSweet, juicy Bartlett pears help ease us into another season. Try a savory pear sandwich (pictured above). Lightly toast 8 slices Italian-style bread. Spread a thin layer of honey mustard on each slice. Top 4 slices with Swiss cheese (1/2 pound, cut into slices). Place under broiler until cheese melts. Divide 2 large pears, cut into twelfths; 3/4 pound thinly sliced ham; and 1 bunch of spinach, destemmed, on the melted cheese. Top with 4 remaining slices of bread.
BUSINESS
By JONATHAN PETERSON and JONATHAN PETERSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Almost one in two American families are headed toward years of financial struggle in retirement, according to a new report that says workers are unprepared for cuts in pension and Social Security income. The Boston College study presumes that most people need to replace 65 percent to 85 percent of their annual income in their working years to stay secure in retirement. But 43 percent of U.S. households will fall at least 10 percent short of that range, the study found, using what it said were conservative projections.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 3, 2002
My mother used to make a cheese souffle that she served at holiday dinners. I never wrote the recipe down, but I would like to try to make it. I think she used Swiss cheese. It's making me sad to keep reading about people who lost or never wrote down their family recipes. I will try to help on one condition: that regardless of whether you like this recipe as is or choose to tweak it to suit your taste, just write the darned thing down and pass it on. That way, some future slob like me won't get a letter from your grandkids asking for help.
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