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Swiss Alps

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TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON and CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON,LOS ANGELES TIME | February 5, 2006
GRINDELWALD, SWITZERLAND / / It is a rare but real phenomenon that mountaineers can sunburn the roofs of their mouths. I know this because I think I have just done it, standing atop the 14,019-foot Finsteraarhorn, crown of the Swiss Alps region known as the Bernese Oberland. My jaw has been unhinged long enough for the snow glare to singe my palate because I have been gasping desperately for oxygen in the stingy air since our group left at dawn to ski-climb 4,000 feet toward the summit; for the last hour, I've been slack-jawed, walking within one misstep of a void that would make a mountain goat queasy; and all week I've been "aaahing" my way through a Switzerland that few tourists ever see -- skiing past prickly peaks with slopes smothered by ancient snows, and without a single twee cowbell in sight.
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SPORTS
By Kaitlyn Carr and Colin Stevens, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Most college athletes spend their summers vacationing and preparing for the next season, very few spend it receiving a key to the city, unless you're Ricky Dobbs. Dobbs, the starting quarterback for the U.S. Naval Academy, was honored by his hometown of Douglasville, Ga., with the key to the city on June 13. "It means a lot," Dobbs said. "I take a lot of pride in where I am from and where I grew up. It means a lot to have them recognize me. It's blessing, an honor and a privilege."
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 6, 1994
Q: My husband and I would like to go hut-to-hut hiking in the Swiss Alps. Are there tour operators who could book such a trip?A: All of the following tour operators can book you on a hut-to-hut trip, which is for the serious hiker and not to be confused with a hotel-to-hotel trip. The mountain huts offer simple accommodations, with sleeping and eating areas (often one and the same). Blankets and pillows are supplied; you bring a sheet and a sleeping bag. Prices, which are for one person, do not include air fare.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 11, 2010
H ey, Vancouver, looking for a little snow for your Winter Olympics? Getting a little worried that things are too green and brown up there with the Opening Ceremony just one day away? Take some of our snow. Please. We've got so much snow in Baltimore, maybe we should be hosting these Olympics. Even as I type this, I'm looking out my window and the snow is falling and the wind is blowing and we've got a gen-u-ine whiteout raging. It's like the Swiss Alps out there.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 11, 2010
H ey, Vancouver, looking for a little snow for your Winter Olympics? Getting a little worried that things are too green and brown up there with the Opening Ceremony just one day away? Take some of our snow. Please. We've got so much snow in Baltimore, maybe we should be hosting these Olympics. Even as I type this, I'm looking out my window and the snow is falling and the wind is blowing and we've got a gen-u-ine whiteout raging. It's like the Swiss Alps out there.
TRAVEL
By Judy Wiley and Judy Wiley,McClatchy-Tribune | March 9, 2008
That dream vacation - diving along the Great Barrier Reef, skiing in the Swiss Alps - could remain a dream forever if you don't get a move on. The brilliant coral off the coast of Australia could be largely gone by 2050, says a 2007 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And rising temperatures in the Alps are already forcing operators to invest in more snowmaking equipment, says Forbestraveler.com. The attention lately focused on these changes, and the overall issue of global warming, has already prompted one latter-day oracle to predict we will travel differently this year and beyond.
SPORTS
By Kaitlyn Carr and Colin Stevens, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Most college athletes spend their summers vacationing and preparing for the next season, very few spend it receiving a key to the city, unless you're Ricky Dobbs. Dobbs, the starting quarterback for the U.S. Naval Academy, was honored by his hometown of Douglasville, Ga., with the key to the city on June 13. "It means a lot," Dobbs said. "I take a lot of pride in where I am from and where I grew up. It means a lot to have them recognize me. It's blessing, an honor and a privilege."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Ann LoLordo and Bill Glauber and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 21, 1999
CAIRO, Egypt -- Having won one of the last great aeronautical challenges of the century, two men in a balloon landed triumphantly today in the cradle of one of the world's oldest civilizations. Switzerland's Bertrand Piccard and Britain's Brian Jones descended into Egypt, the land of of the pharaohs, in the early morning today -- on the other side of North Africa from where they became the first human beings to circumnavigate the globe nonstop in a balloon. Controllers for the longest balloon odyssey in history said the craft landed north of the remote Dakhla oasis, deep into the Western Desert about 300 miles southwest of Cairo, where they had hoped to make a spectacular landing at the pyramids.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | September 14, 2003
MENTION AMATEUR sports, and most folks picture a ball field, a gym, tennis courts, a golf course or maybe a runner or cyclist climbing a hill. Clarksville's Judi Carbary, who had known that more challenging imagery is possible, recently added fear of flying off a mountainside to what she envisions. Carbary is a duathlete, a qualifier for the U.S. national team in several world age-group championships for that little-known blend of running and cycling. She and a lot of other duathetes will never forget this year's world event in mountainous Albis, Switzerland, at the end of last month.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 27, 1995
GENEVA -- With pessimism reigning on both sides, the top trade negotiators from the United States and Japan began a last-minute attempt to reach an auto trade agreement before U.S. sanctions take effect after a deadline set for tomorrow.Japanese Trade Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto compared the task facing the negotiators to scaling the nearby Swiss Alps."There are a lot of mountains in this country that are very difficult to climb," he said.U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor gave Mr. Hashimoto, an amateur martial arts fighter, a "Kendo" stick as the two smiled and posed for photographers before starting an evening negotiating session.
TRAVEL
By Judy Wiley and Judy Wiley,McClatchy-Tribune | March 9, 2008
That dream vacation - diving along the Great Barrier Reef, skiing in the Swiss Alps - could remain a dream forever if you don't get a move on. The brilliant coral off the coast of Australia could be largely gone by 2050, says a 2007 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And rising temperatures in the Alps are already forcing operators to invest in more snowmaking equipment, says Forbestraveler.com. The attention lately focused on these changes, and the overall issue of global warming, has already prompted one latter-day oracle to predict we will travel differently this year and beyond.
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON and CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON,LOS ANGELES TIME | February 5, 2006
GRINDELWALD, SWITZERLAND / / It is a rare but real phenomenon that mountaineers can sunburn the roofs of their mouths. I know this because I think I have just done it, standing atop the 14,019-foot Finsteraarhorn, crown of the Swiss Alps region known as the Bernese Oberland. My jaw has been unhinged long enough for the snow glare to singe my palate because I have been gasping desperately for oxygen in the stingy air since our group left at dawn to ski-climb 4,000 feet toward the summit; for the last hour, I've been slack-jawed, walking within one misstep of a void that would make a mountain goat queasy; and all week I've been "aaahing" my way through a Switzerland that few tourists ever see -- skiing past prickly peaks with slopes smothered by ancient snows, and without a single twee cowbell in sight.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | September 14, 2003
MENTION AMATEUR sports, and most folks picture a ball field, a gym, tennis courts, a golf course or maybe a runner or cyclist climbing a hill. Clarksville's Judi Carbary, who had known that more challenging imagery is possible, recently added fear of flying off a mountainside to what she envisions. Carbary is a duathlete, a qualifier for the U.S. national team in several world age-group championships for that little-known blend of running and cycling. She and a lot of other duathetes will never forget this year's world event in mountainous Albis, Switzerland, at the end of last month.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Ann LoLordo and Bill Glauber and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 21, 1999
CAIRO, Egypt -- Having won one of the last great aeronautical challenges of the century, two men in a balloon landed triumphantly today in the cradle of one of the world's oldest civilizations. Switzerland's Bertrand Piccard and Britain's Brian Jones descended into Egypt, the land of of the pharaohs, in the early morning today -- on the other side of North Africa from where they became the first human beings to circumnavigate the globe nonstop in a balloon. Controllers for the longest balloon odyssey in history said the craft landed north of the remote Dakhla oasis, deep into the Western Desert about 300 miles southwest of Cairo, where they had hoped to make a spectacular landing at the pyramids.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 6, 1994
Q: My husband and I would like to go hut-to-hut hiking in the Swiss Alps. Are there tour operators who could book such a trip?A: All of the following tour operators can book you on a hut-to-hut trip, which is for the serious hiker and not to be confused with a hotel-to-hotel trip. The mountain huts offer simple accommodations, with sleeping and eating areas (often one and the same). Blankets and pillows are supplied; you bring a sheet and a sleeping bag. Prices, which are for one person, do not include air fare.
NEWS
November 27, 1997
HERE ARE a few footnotes on World War I. The A group is less taxing than the B group, which is for serious Great War junkies.PeopleA) Baron Manfred von Richthofen. was the war's top-scoring air ace and, thanks to the ''Peanuts'' cartoon, may be its best-remembered figure. The real Red Baron racked up 80 victories before being shot down and killed in 1918.B) Expatriate American Gene Bullard was heavily decorated for bravery in the French Foreign Legion, then transferred to the French air force and became the world's first black fighter pilot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 22, 2011
Fire up that DVR: Here's our picks for Friday-Sunday. FRIDAY •"NSTF:SD:SUV" (Midnight; Adult Swim): The series premiere of the show (above) that rightfully takes "CSI" and "SUV" and all those other acronym-happy programs down a peg. • "Deadly Women: Deadliest Women" (8 p.m.; ID): Not sure what exactly qualifies a deadly woman as deadlier than another, but ID is helping us out. • "20/20" (9 p.m.; WMAR/ABC): I usually don't recommend "20/20," but this episode is about people with "unusual super-powers," like a dude who can draw cityscapes from memory.
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