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NEWS
October 28, 1993
Along with the typewriter, the rotary telephone and good manners, cash is becoming obsolete in American society. Anything from a few magazines to a hot tub can be charged on VISA. Paying for a gas fill-up or a bag of groceries is easily done with an automatic teller machine card. And thanks to payroll deposits and banking by phone, folks no longer have to schlep their checks to the savings and loan to feed their accounts.The latest bastions to fall in this coup de cash are the public libraries and school cafeterias of Baltimore County.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
Hillary Clinton's tactical retreat in her soft apology and meet-up with President Obama at Martha's Vineyard, after her ill-timed criticism of his "failure" in aiding Syrian refugees, indicates she may not be quite ready to put her best foot forward for the 2016 presidential race. Her remark in her interview with The Atlantic magazine, otherwise fulsome in praise of him, came at a time when Mr. Obama is struggling with a full plate of foreign policy woes. Inadvertently or not, it seemed politically self-serving, as she seems bent on shoring up her own acceptance with the more liberal elements in her own party.
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EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
Half a century ago, the future was an oft-discussed topic. There would be flying cars in skyways that would have replaced our highways. Colonies in space or on the moon? Heck, there was serious talk of commuting to and from space stations. Oh yeah, there would be no money. Instead things would be bought and sold through an automated system that linked credit and cash on hand in an account. Cars don't fly, highways on the ground are congested and no one commutes to the International Space Station, at least not on a daily basis, but 50 years after a space age vision of the future was a subject of discussion for an optimistic America, one prediction has nearly come true: cash just ain't what it used to be. Sure, just about everyone carries a few bucks, maybe even a Jackson or two, but most transactions involving double digit dollar amounts are conducted in the space age way. Swipe a card, tap a token or simply punch in a code on a keypad and hundreds or even thousands of dollars (virtual dollars, actually)
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Harried commuters will be gratified by the Maryland Public Service Commission's decision last week to require taxicabs operating in Baltimore City to install credit card-reading devices in the back seat where passengers sit. The new rule, which goes into effect at the end of the year, will allow customers to just swipe a Mastercard or Visa to pay the fare rather than having to carry cash. It's a convenience riders in other cities have long enjoyed, and it has probably taken a lot of the anxiety out of hailing a cab. It's about time Baltimore caught up with the trend.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
Long lines and Opening Day glitches prompted the Orioles to give up on their new, $500,000 ticket-reading system a half-hour before game time and revert to the low-tech but time-honored method of ushers tearing tickets.The system, designed to speed fans through gates and cut down on the use of counterfeit tickets, never crashed. But the delays at the gates prompted grumbles from fans and ushers and promises by the team to make improvements.Among other things, more powerful equipment may be needed to rapidly read the bar codes on each ticket.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 27, 2007
I can see why Bob Ehrlich, a competitive guy, would want to reclaim the governor's mansion four years from now. And why, given the ridiculous cost of campaigns, he'd start raising money now. What I don't get is, what's in it for Womble, Carlyle, the law firm serving as the ex-gov's Elba-on-the-Patapsco? "Kendel, Drew, Josh and I have settled into our new home just outside of Annapolis and I've started an exciting new job with a large law firm," Ehrlich writes in a recent fundraising letter that notes his campaign headquarters will stay open.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 4, 2001
WHEN DAWN Jones discovered that her 14-year-old son had been caught shoplifting, she did what more than a few parents would do: She lost her composure, and then she took a swipe at him. When Anne Arundel County prosecutors discovered this, they did what some parents might find unsettling: They indicted her on a charge of child abuse. And, last week, a Circuit Court jury took all of 15 minutes to say: Can we please get some sense of distinction between child abuse and parental discipline?
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Tens of thousands of people in Baltimore who use food stamps to buy groceries can now do their shopping at the Baltimore Farmers' Market and Bazaar under the Jones Falls Expressway, thanks to a new token system launched Sunday. Customers who don't have cash at the fresh-produce market off East Saratoga Street can now swipe their debit cards to make purchases as well. At a public opening of the market's new welcome center, where debit and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | September 25, 2000
The mouse on my desktop got a companion this week - the CueCat - and it's a fascinating gadget indeed. It's 5 inches long and shaped like a stylized feline, ready to pounce, with a mysterious red light emanating from its open mouth. It connects to the keyboard port of my computer with a Y-cable. To get it working I had to install driver software and register on the company's Web site, providing my name, e-mail address, age, sex and ZIP code. So what do I get for my trouble? Well, when I rub the CueCat across the Universal Product Code on a box of Glad garbage bags, my Web browser launches and takes me to Glad's home page.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | April 29, 2007
Here's the thing. I'm nosy. I admit it. So if your diary is lying on the table, it might as well be a Krispy Kreme doughnut. I will devour it. And if you're my husband and your e-mail account is open, sitting on our computer, begging to be read - well, I have my evening entertainment. This is how my new hobby - stalking my husband - began. And ended. One night, my husband went to bed early. I got into the computer to check my e-mail on Google when, BAM, his account was still up. Jackpot!
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Del. Steve Schuh and Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman traded barbs this week over alleged ethical lapses as the Republican campaign for the county's top job heats up. Schuh fired the first shot Thursday, saying he planned to file an ethics complaint alleging Neuman and some of her staff have been doing campaign work on county time. Schuh made the allegations as Neuman conducted a day-long tour of the county to officially launch her bid to win a full term as county executive.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
As hopefuls in the governor's race debated transportation Tuesday night, Del. Heather Mizeur questioned Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's competence in light of the failing health care exchange he oversaw. Mizeur said the pending public-private-partnership to build the 16-mile Purple Line between  Prince George's and Montgomery counties would cost ten times the amount of money spent on the online insurance marketplace. And like the health exchange, the Purple Line deal was complicated and challenging to implement, she said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
PHILADELPHIA - Navy freshman cornerback Brendon Clements had gained plenty of on-field experience going into his first Army-Navy game, having started for much of his first year in Annapolis. Yet when Clements woke up Saturday morning at the team's hotel, he was more nervous than he had ever been for a college game. The feeling didn't go away after he went to breakfast, nor did it after he a pregame meeting. “I told some of the other players I haven't been nervous all year and I'm nervous now, and we haven't even left for the game yet,” Clements recalled a few hours later.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
A family-run crime enterprise carried out a series of high-wire burglaries, swiping entire safes, cracking open ATMs, and cutting power and phone service to businesses before rushing in, according to federal charges unsealed Thursday. But the flashy robberies were a sideshow to the crew's prescription pill dealing at its home base in an auto shop on a dead-end Southwest Baltimore street, authorities allege. The group also is accused of distributing drugs at Lexington Market and smuggling them into a Jessup prison.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Tens of thousands of people in Baltimore who use food stamps to buy groceries can now do their shopping at the Baltimore Farmers' Market and Bazaar under the Jones Falls Expressway, thanks to a new token system launched Sunday. Customers who don't have cash at the fresh-produce market off East Saratoga Street can now swipe their debit cards to make purchases as well. At a public opening of the market's new welcome center, where debit and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
Half a century ago, the future was an oft-discussed topic. There would be flying cars in skyways that would have replaced our highways. Colonies in space or on the moon? Heck, there was serious talk of commuting to and from space stations. Oh yeah, there would be no money. Instead things would be bought and sold through an automated system that linked credit and cash on hand in an account. Cars don't fly, highways on the ground are congested and no one commutes to the International Space Station, at least not on a daily basis, but 50 years after a space age vision of the future was a subject of discussion for an optimistic America, one prediction has nearly come true: cash just ain't what it used to be. Sure, just about everyone carries a few bucks, maybe even a Jackson or two, but most transactions involving double digit dollar amounts are conducted in the space age way. Swipe a card, tap a token or simply punch in a code on a keypad and hundreds or even thousands of dollars (virtual dollars, actually)
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | August 17, 2006
You wake up on a summer morning, the smell of possibility in the air, and you feel slim and gifted and innocent, and you should mow the lawn, but as Walt Whitman said, "What is the grass? It is the handkerchief of the Lord, a scented gift." And who would cut God's hanky? Not you. Time to set aside the drudgery of home maintenance and go off in search of the incomparable wonders of this world. Nebulae spiral in the sky thousands of centuries away, the Mississippi flows round the bend, ripe tomatoes hang on the vine, and also there is baseball.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
As the sun rose over the Atlantic in the early hours of April 15, 2003, an Ocean City police officer pulled his squad car into the parking lot near the inlet that separates Assateague Island from the carnival rides of the boardwalk. He had been sent there to investigate a report of a suspicious car, parked facing the water with its lights on. In the Hyundai Santa Fe, the officer saw a cell phone hooked to a charger, a handbag and an empty bottle of hydrocodone. Next to the purse, the officer wrote in his report, were a set of keys and a letter written in a gentle cursive on lined yellow notebook paper.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
You might not have paid attention to the fierce yearlong battle between merchants and banks over debit cards, but you'll likely notice last week's outcome in your wallet. The dispute was over the debit card interchange fee — the payment merchants make to banks to process customer transactions. Last year's Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act law required that the Federal Reserve ensure that the fee was "reasonable. " Last week, the Fed announced it was cutting the fee — but not by nearly as much as merchants wanted.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 23, 2010
Citing numerous examples of waste and mismanagement, a citizens group appointed to analyze city services recommended that Baltimore study privatizing trash collection, create a program to quickly dispose of vacant houses and consider extracting property taxes from nonprofits such as hospitals and schools. The 150-member transition committee, selected by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to advise her as she took the reins of city government, blasts the Department of Housing and Community Development in particular, saying it "appears to lack a clear and coherent vision for revitalizing ... neighborhoods."
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