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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2000
Howard County Councilman Guy J. Guzzone could be the man in the middle on two of the county's most sensitive issues -- crowded schools and development. It's not a new position for the slow-growth environmentalist. His two fellow Democrats on the council often split with the two Republicans, leaving him as the five-member group's swing vote. A council public hearing tonight will showcase the tougher issue: whether to include middle schools in the law limiting development around the county's crowded elementary schools.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
A former math teacher. A firefighter. A lawyer. A small-business woman. A full-time doctoral student. A congressional aide. When the legislative session started in January, the six delegates from different cliques in Maryland's clubby General Assembly had this in common: None would have called himself or herself a supporter of Gov. Martin O'Malley's bill to legalize same-sex marriage. Yet all cast votes Friday in favor of the measure, providing the margin needed to pass the bill, 72-67, in the House of Delegates, which had rejected a similar measure 11 months ago. Some never let on that they were wavering.
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NEWS
By New York Times News ServiceThe Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | May 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. David L. Boren of Oklahoma, who holds the crucial swing vote that could make or break President Clinton's $496 billion deficit reduction package, said yesterday that the odds had greatly improved that a compromise he could support could be worked out.Mr. Boren's new position almost guarantees enactment of legislation to lower the budget deficit, said Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, chairman of the Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over much of the Clinton plan.Until yesterday, Mr. Boren, one of 11 Democrats on the committee, had threatened to block the budget plan, which was approved by the House of Representatives in a cliffhanger last week and seemed to face an even rougher road in the Senate.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
Some of the delegates who struggled, and ultimately supported legalizing same-sex marriage in Maryland Name: Del. Tiffany Alston, Prince George's County Democrat Age: 34 A reason: Amendment she proposed protecting referendum was adopted Quote: "It is time for us to move beyond this issue. " Name: Del. Pam Beidle, Anne Arundel County Democrat Age: 60 A reason: Concerned gay families don't have the same rights as straight families. Quote: "I just really thought about the issue.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
The Board of Education never gets more attention than when it talks about sex.And no one on the board gets more attention than Ann M. Ballard, who has been targeted as the swing vote in such matters."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
The late director Sydney Pollack said the ability to relax in front of the camera is a key to great film acting. Nobody chills out for the lens better than Kevin Costner, especially when he's playing a character he calls "the American rascal," in movies like Bull Durham and Tin Cup, The Upside of Anger and the new political comedy-drama Swing Vote. When Costner fleshes out a confused man like Swing Vote's Bud Johnson - who finds himself, after a lifetime of apathy, casting the deciding vote in a presidential election - he doesn't exaggerate his awkwardness.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
Kevin Costner can do certain kinds of American confusion better than anyone else. He's nonpareil at playing the mental fog that isn't quite a hangover, or the comfort a modest man can take in a homey, familiar mess. As Bud Johnson, the single father and sometime egg-factory worker in the mild political comedy-drama Swing Vote, he plays a middle-aged slacker so unsentimentally, and with such ease and conviction, that he supplies the movie with a comic engine that keeps running when the script wheezes and splutters.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 7, 1993
Late last week, C. Edward Middlebrooks was a beleaguered swing vote in a battle between two candidates for chairman of the County Council. He was hounded by fellow Democrats who warned him not to dare vote for Republican Carl G. "Dutch" Holland.The contenders, Mr. Holland and current Council Chairman David G. Boschert, each had three votes in the seven-member council.Last night, Mr. Middlebrooks went from swing vote to top vote-getter. In a surprise move, after being nominated by Mr. Middlebrooks for a third-term as chairman, Mr. Boschert withdrew his name, citing a need to concentrate on his business interests.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- In the end, it was clean air vs. jobs -- and the jobs won.Sen. Ralph Hughes, a Baltimore Democrat, stunned the Schaefer administration yesterday by casting the deciding vote against a bill that would require all new cars sold in Maryland to meet California's stringent tailpipe emission standards.However, a similar bill is about to move out of the House of Delegates, giving the issue a second chance in the Senate.Mr. Hughes said he decided two days ago to vote against the bill because of autoworkers who were concerned about their jobs at General Motors Corp.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | August 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot stalked the halls of Congress this week, just a quiet little reminder to lawmakers that he will not be ignored.With his briefcase, his just-folks style, and a core group of supporters who represent the swing vote to many House and Senate Democrats facing re-election next year, he urged members of Congress to vote down the president's budget plan.Or face the consequences.Mr. Perot has used the budget as his latest weapon against President Clinton and also as a sword to hold over the heads of lawmakers on their way to the 1994 elections.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
The late director Sydney Pollack said the ability to relax in front of the camera is a key to great film acting. Nobody chills out for the lens better than Kevin Costner, especially when he's playing a character he calls "the American rascal," in movies like Bull Durham and Tin Cup, The Upside of Anger and the new political comedy-drama Swing Vote. When Costner fleshes out a confused man like Swing Vote's Bud Johnson - who finds himself, after a lifetime of apathy, casting the deciding vote in a presidential election - he doesn't exaggerate his awkwardness.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
Kevin Costner can do certain kinds of American confusion better than anyone else. He's nonpareil at playing the mental fog that isn't quite a hangover, or the comfort a modest man can take in a homey, familiar mess. As Bud Johnson, the single father and sometime egg-factory worker in the mild political comedy-drama Swing Vote, he plays a middle-aged slacker so unsentimentally, and with such ease and conviction, that he supplies the movie with a comic engine that keeps running when the script wheezes and splutters.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2008
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators appeared poised yesterday to give final approval to the merger of the nation's only two satellite radio operators, which would bring together the struggling companies after a 17-month quest. Deborah Taylor Tate, a Republican who held the swing vote on the five-member Federal Communications Commission, reportedly was ready to vote in favor of the $3.9 billion merger if Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. agreed to new conditions.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Sen. Alex X. Mooney fielded a surprise call this week from Cardinal William H. Keeler, who urged the Frederick Republican to vote today for a repeal of the death penalty. Their five-minute chat, though notable because of the caller's position as archbishop of Baltimore, is one of many conversations Mooney has had as he considers his position on a bill to get rid of the state's capital punishment law. The conservative Catholic talked recently with an African Methodist Episcopal church leader from his hometown and also dined for three hours Tuesday evening in Bowie with former Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, a one-time seminarian who opposes capital punishment.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | August 29, 2006
When Orioles rookie Nick Markakis popped out of the dugout for a curtain call after his third home run of the night last Tuesday, Terry Crowley remained in the background, exactly where he wanted to be. Leaning against a partition a couple of yards away, Crowley peered upward at his helmet-tipping pupil and smiled. It was the smile of a proud hitting coach, seeing hours of teaching put into practice. It was the smile of a man who considers his hitters more like "sons" than students, and feels their pain and joy. O's@Rangers Tonight, 8:05, Ch. 13, 1090 AM Starters: Orioles' Rodrigo Lopez (9-13, 6.03)
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
New research from a Chicago advocacy group estimates that 14 million immigrants could become new voters by the 2008 election, representing a crucial voting group in tight races around the country. The figures, released in a report yesterday by the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, illustrate an untapped electoral power at a time when Congress is engaged in a bruising battle over immigration policy, said advocates. Maryland, with an estimated 195,000 potential voters, is one of 17 states whose immigrant populations could swing tight races, the study says.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | January 19, 2006
The Senate confirmation hearings for Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. told us more about the senators than they did about Judge Alito. First, there were those long-winded preambles to "questions" for the judge. Then there were the Mickey Mouse maneuvers and insinuations, spiced here and there with outright lies. The ridiculousness of the charges was classically illustrated by Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr.'s claim that Judge Alito had been part of a group that was trying to keep minorities and women out of Princeton.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Sen. Alex X. Mooney fielded a surprise call this week from Cardinal William H. Keeler, who urged the Frederick Republican to vote today for a repeal of the death penalty. Their five-minute chat, though notable because of the caller's position as archbishop of Baltimore, is one of many conversations Mooney has had as he considers his position on a bill to get rid of the state's capital punishment law. The conservative Catholic talked recently with an African Methodist Episcopal church leader from his hometown and also dined for three hours Tuesday evening in Bowie with former Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, a one-time seminarian who opposes capital punishment.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In an exchange of speeches that increasingly focused on presidential powers and whether President Bush has exceeded them, the Senate began formal debate yesterday on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. No firm date has been set for a Senate vote, but Democrats and Republicans say they expect it to be before the president's State of the Union address Tuesday. With no Democratic filibuster anticipated, Alito's confirmation on a largely party-line vote appears all but certain.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | January 19, 2006
The Senate confirmation hearings for Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. told us more about the senators than they did about Judge Alito. First, there were those long-winded preambles to "questions" for the judge. Then there were the Mickey Mouse maneuvers and insinuations, spiced here and there with outright lies. The ridiculousness of the charges was classically illustrated by Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr.'s claim that Judge Alito had been part of a group that was trying to keep minorities and women out of Princeton.
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