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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | January 19, 1995
Dreaming about a beach, palm trees and a paperback thriller? It's that time of year and it's possible. What with special travel packages, built-up flier miles, professional convention junkets, and even spring-break freebies at granny's Florida condo, beach time in winter is becoming a reality for many Americans.For many women, however, that dream of a sunny spell is clouded by the nightmare of buying a bathing suit.The Travel Industry Association of America figures a record number of us will be tripping this winter, says spokeswoman Shawn Flaherty, and she cites a figure of 134 million.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Offenbacher Aquatics Inc., a regional retailer of patio furniture, grills and fireplaces, has been acquired by a private equity buyout firm that plans to expand the chain and upgrade stores and the online presence. Antson Capital Partners LLC, based in Baltimore, said Wednesday it acquired the Lanham-based retailer's seven stores, in Maryland and Virginia. Financial terms were not disclosed. "Offenbacher's has strong name recognition and presents us with a substantial opportunity to increase market share in the region and expand our footprint," Andrew Cohen, an investor who was named chief executive officer of Offenbacher, said in the announcement.
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FEATURES
By Tammy Theis and Tammy Theis,Dallas Morning News | January 22, 1992
FASHION's obsession with the past has caught up with swimwear. As skimpy bikinis and thongs give way to more covered-up looks of the '40s and '50s, the bathing beauty once again takes over from the beach bunny.More covered up, however, doesn't necessarily mean less sexy. The newly resurgent swimsuits place emphasis squarely on the bosom, as molded cup bras with underwire construction give the body glamorous curves and figure-enhancing support. One-piece and two-piece suits alike feature the '40s-style bra, built into strapless bandeaus, halters and maillots.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green | July 25, 2013
Just a few serious sunburns can increase your child's risk of skin cancer later in life. Annapolis-based Snapper Rock (snapperrock.com) offers a line of colorful and stylish UV50+ swimwear for children ages 0-12, from swimsuits and board shorts to hats and cover-ups. The sun protection comes not from chemically treating the fabric, but from the density of the weave and the nylon and elastane blend, which blocks 98 percent of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | May 23, 1991
At last! After decades during which bathing suits seemed designed by men -- or perhaps by women who ate only lettuce -- this year's swimwear is designed to enhance the figure. On top of that, designers are offering coverups that not only flatter but can be worn off the beach to lunch and even, according to some, to dinner.How could this be?Has fashion become flattering and functional?You decide: This year, the hottest swimsuits have fancy hTC underwire bras, legs that aren't cut up to the hip and beyond, as well as lots of metallic or jewel trim.
FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | June 24, 1992
"It took the space industry 10 years to put a man on the moon," said swimwear designer Anne Cole. "It took the swimwear industry 100 years to move from the ankle to the crotch."Ms. Cole should know. She has witnessed a major chunk of swimwear trends for the past 40 years.Ms. Cole's father, Fred Cole, was a former actor who founded Cole of California in 1925. Ms. Cole began working for her father in 1950 and has been involved in the swimwear business ever since."I'm the oldest living swimsuit designer," Ms. Cole said.
FEATURES
By Susanne Trowbridge | January 23, 1992
Swimsuit trauma. Surely every woman has experienced that horrible, sinking feeling when some cute little bikini or maillot suddenly became a magnifying glass for figure flaws. Even if she'd successfully struggled to lose that last 10 pounds, high-cut leg lines or too-skimpy two-pieces meant that when she looked in the dressing room mirror, she was confronted with lumps and bulges she never knew she had."It had gotten to the point where you almost had to have what they call a 'hardbody' to wear a suit," says June Wylie, publicity director for the popular swimwear manufacturer Catalina.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2006
GETTING WOMEN IN COST-CONSCIOUS Baltimore to pay $200 for a swimsuit is no easy feat. But Water Water Everywhere, a specialty swimwear shop based in Owings Mills, seems to have found a way. BEACH GUIDE FOR TIPS ON BEACHES FROM NEW JERSEY TO THE OUTER BANKS, LOOK FOR THE SUN'S BEACH GUIDE ON MAY 19.,
NEWS
By Susan Phinney and Susan Phinney,SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER | June 20, 1999
Swimwear shopping is getting easier.That doesn't mean stores have installed dim lighting and trick mirrors in dressing rooms.It means swim-wear manufacturers are making more suits with built-in support for an aging population that needs them. And they're marketing a wider range of styles so customers have a greater chance of finding a suit that fits and flatters.Big retailers are even grouping all swimwear together so a shopper can select without having to move to another department or floor.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 29, 1992
What's inflatable, not a toy, but could be fun on the beach?An inflatable swimsuit, of course.In early September, Cole of California will introduce Top Secret swimwear, which includes an inflatable bikini top with a pump-you-up system, a new "breath of air" on the ever-present quest toward breast enhancement.Priced at $72, the suit operates similarly to air-pump sneakers. A small rubber "bladder" sits between two padded wedges on the side of the breast."Pump it a little to turn heads. Pump it a lot to cause a frenzy," scream the promotional campaign brochures.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Fashion-savvy bathing beauties know that what was sexy yesterday can look a little tarty today. Especially when one of the hottest trends this summer is more conservative, vintage-inspired swimwear from designer lines like Betsey Johnson, Trina Turk and Juicy Couture. The one-piece suit is making a comeback in a big way -- across the board from all manufacturers. Of course, there are still lots of skimpy bikinis to be seen at pools and beaches this summer, but those who really want to be fashion-forward are going retro.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Last July, at a small swimming meet in Athens, Ga., Michael Phelps stood on the starting blocks wearing a plain, black swimsuit. No logo, no frills and nothing that would raise an eyebrow - at least, until he hit the water. Wearing a prototype suit that was still under top-secret development, Phelps zipped through the 200-meter freestyle in the fastest time an American has ever managed on his home soil. It was the first hint of what was to come. Today - more than a year after Phelps first wore the suit and exactly one year before the Beijing Olympics begin - swimming enthusiasts are already abuzz over how 21st-century technology might translate to the pool next summer and what it might do to some of the sport's most venerable records.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
FOR DECADES, THE BIKINI has been the one-piece bathing suit's prettier, sexier and more-popular younger sister. But lately, the tried-and-true one-piece has gotten a bit of a makeover -- shedding a few inches in some key areas, adding some key accessories and ramping up its sex appeal. Strategically placed cut-outs, hardware and daring shapes and colors all have made the new and improved one-piece hipper and more desirable, sparking a noticeable resurgence in the swimwear staple. "The one-piece swimsuit has been an iconic fashion statement for decades," says Michael Fink, vice president of women's fashion for Saks Fifth Avenue, adding that the company is "seeing an increase in the demand for one-piece swimsuits."
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2006
Water Water Everywhere, an Owings Mills-based retailer of women's swimwear and accessories that has grown to 20 locations across the country from one store in 1990, has agreed to be acquired by Bear Growth Capital Partners and merge with a larger rival based in Orlando, Fla. Bear Growth Capital Partners, part of the private equity arm of investment banker Bear Stearns Cos., announced this week that it entered into a letter of intent to acquire Water Water...
NEWS
May 7, 2006
MARYLAND Firm subcontracted work The minority-owned firm tied to Baltimore City Council President Sheila Dixon - already under scrutiny for how it operates - has rarely, if ever, performed its own work on government contracts and city-backed developments, according to documents obtained by The Sun. pg 1a Academy tackles sexual assault The U.S. Naval Academy is pursuing a new tack in its crackdown on sexual harassment and assault, prosecuting a...
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2006
GETTING WOMEN IN COST-CONSCIOUS Baltimore to pay $200 for a swimsuit is no easy feat. But Water Water Everywhere, a specialty swimwear shop based in Owings Mills, seems to have found a way. BEACH GUIDE FOR TIPS ON BEACHES FROM NEW JERSEY TO THE OUTER BANKS, LOOK FOR THE SUN'S BEACH GUIDE ON MAY 19.,
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | April 13, 2003
That great harbinger of summer, the swimsuit issue, has arrived at last. No! No! Not Sports Illustrated. The L.L. Bean Swimwear Guide, which we visited this year on the Internet (at www.llbean.com). Sculptured bodies with generous displays of flesh do not appear in the Bean bag. No teen-aged boys are going to grab the catalog before you get a chance to review it. The models are relentlessly wholesome. They look like moms, or big sisters. Swimsuit choices are sensible, not sensual. Bean offers no bikinis, let alone a thong -- unthinkable in Freeport, Maine.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green | July 25, 2013
Just a few serious sunburns can increase your child's risk of skin cancer later in life. Annapolis-based Snapper Rock (snapperrock.com) offers a line of colorful and stylish UV50+ swimwear for children ages 0-12, from swimsuits and board shorts to hats and cover-ups. The sun protection comes not from chemically treating the fabric, but from the density of the weave and the nylon and elastane blend, which blocks 98 percent of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Staff | May 15, 2005
For the last few decades, when it came to picking your new summer bathing suit, yellow and polka-dot weren't absolute must-haves. But itsy-bitsy was definitely in order, and teeny-weeny was even better. But nowadays -- with fashion's recent demure, ladylike bent -- it's more with-it to cover up a bit when sunning on the beach or taking a dip in the pool. And the cutest, coolest way to do that is with a flirty little swimskirt. Retailers are calling the newest trend in swimwear by different names -- some call it a swim-mini, others a skirtini -- but there's universal agreement about its style quotient.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
NEW YORK - Pressure is the name of a sleek Greenwich Village nightclub that Michael Phelps, by virtue of his tender age, could not set foot into most evenings. Yesterday morning, though, there was no question of keeping out the reigning king of the competitive-swimming world, who, incidentally, is no stranger to pressure himself. If Phelps wasn't exactly the guest of honor, he was definitely the primary draw for most of those gathered here, including several journalists from across the Atlantic who came for the express purpose of gaining an audience with the man many expect to be the star of next summer's Olympics in Athens.
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