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Sweetheart Deal

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NEWS
October 10, 2011
In the October 7th edition of the Baltimore Sun, it was reported that Under Armour had "received City Planning Commission approval Thursday to pursue waterfront improvement projects near its Locust Point headquarters with the help of tax increment financing. " It further states that these projects "include a community pier ... bulkhead improvements ... a 'greenway'" and "a pedestrian bridge. " What the article did not report was the parts of these projects that will have a significant impact on Locust Point's ever increasing traffic and parking problems, and it glazed over the fact the city's taxpayers are again going out on a limb to sell bonds to finance this for wealthy developers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 27, 2011
A week before Christmas and the first thing I read in the Sunday paper is a story about our county officials' sweetheart deal on their government pensions. One who makes $180,000 a year can collect $111,000 in pension. I am offended by this. Also, a school principal is earning over $100,000 when a policeman who risks his life every day has a starting salary of $37,000 a year. I won't even mention the minimum wage earners and unemployed. Judging by all the fraud taking place in every level of government, our tax money is again being misused.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2002
Baltimore County councilmen criticized yesterday a proposal to lease 32 acres of parkland to the Baltimore Ravens for a new training facility, calling it a "sweetheart deal" for the team, but said they will likely pass it anyway. Vincent J. Gardina, a Perry Hall Democrat, expressed the strongest opposition to the deal, saying he thought it was inappropriate to lease parkland to a for-profit business. "I think that's the issue that really stings here, that we have a private business ... locating here in a sweetheart deal in a public park, purchased with [state]
NEWS
December 18, 2011
On May 27, 2010, the Baltimore County Council voted on legislation that would reduce pension benefits for thousands of government workers. The bill, part of a plan by then-County Executive James T. Smith Jr. to shore up the finances of the pension system, limited cost-of-living increases for county retirees and raised the amount of their paychecks county workers were required to contribute. But a last-minute amendment added to the bill would turn out to be worth tens of thousands of dollars to three of the councilmen who voted it into law. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and former councilmen Stephen G. Samuel Moxley and Vincent J. Gardina, both of whom have been hired into top positions in the Kamenetz administration, are taking advantage of a new provision of the law that allows them to earn their county salaries, accrue new retirement benefits and bank their council pensions for a lump-sum payout when they retire for good.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
After spending $54 million to help cover expenses at the Pulaski incinerator, city officials may move today to sever ties with millionaire owner Willard Hackerman.Over 14 years, city taxpayers have covered reimbursements for the incinerator's equipment, maintenance -- and even its mortgage and taxes. The Schmoke administration's agreement proposes a final payment to Mr. Hackerman of $450,000 for construction costs that the city agreed to pay under the original deal.But the city's proposal to pay Mr. Hackerman more money -- on the Board of Estimates' agenda today -- has sparked opposition.
NEWS
April 30, 1996
Marina operator will pay back rentWe, at Baltimore Yacht Basin, are somewhat surprised at the information that The Sun has collected from its sources. In the April 23 editorial ("S.O.S. on managing city real estate"), you have alluded to us, although not by name, as getting a ''sweetheart deal -- an eight-year lease with no rent due the first two years, to settle a court fight over back taxes and rent . . . owed''We wish that we didn't have to pay rent for two years. In fact, the ''sweetheart deal'' involves payment of more than $1 million for the eight years, with monthly payments due in 1996 and 1997 totaling $116,000 and $212,000, respectively.
NEWS
September 21, 1999
Don't call it a sweetheart deal. The county and state moved swiftly, but properly, to locate the new Sweetheart Cup Co. Inc. distribution center at the Route 30 industrial site just south of the Hampstead town limits.Residents and the town council complain that the project was pushed through without adequate public comment. Yet only one person showed up to object at the advertised planning meeting. The council held a closed meeting with company representatives in March, and didn't take a position.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Tom Pelton and Ivan Penn and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
After a heated, two-hour debate, the Board of Estimates approved a 75-year lease agreement -- criticized as a "sweetheart deal" for the Cordish Co. -- that will allow the developer to convert an almost vacant mall near the Inner Harbor into an entertainment complex.City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt urged newly sworn-in Mayor Martin O'Malley to postpone a vote on the $5 million revitalization project for a week until city officials more closely review details of the more than 90-page agreement.
NEWS
By TRB | April 14, 1994
Washington. -- Unless you've been in a coma lately, you may have heard about Hillary Clinton's commodities trades. In less than a year during the late 1970s, while her husband was governor, she turned $1,000 into $100,000. It is only natural to suspect that this was a sweetheart deal of some sort -- though, so far, no one can figure out exactly what sort.But unless you're a Whitewater obsessive, you may have missed the story of Hillary's cellular-phone deal. In just four years during the mid-1980s, she turned a $2,000 investment in a cellular-franchise application into a $46,000 payoff.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | June 25, 1993
NEW YORK -- American Industrial Partners has disclosed that it is paying $441 million to buy Sweetheart Holdings Inc., the former Maryland Cup Corp., in a debt-cutting deal that could be completed by the end of July.According to the details of the plan, which were disclosed Wednesday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, American Industrial is to buy the company from Morgan Stanley Group Inc. and terminate an existing contract with Chicago-based Horrigan Silver Inc., which was hired by Morgan Stanley to run the company.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
In the October 7th edition of the Baltimore Sun, it was reported that Under Armour had "received City Planning Commission approval Thursday to pursue waterfront improvement projects near its Locust Point headquarters with the help of tax increment financing. " It further states that these projects "include a community pier ... bulkhead improvements ... a 'greenway'" and "a pedestrian bridge. " What the article did not report was the parts of these projects that will have a significant impact on Locust Point's ever increasing traffic and parking problems, and it glazed over the fact the city's taxpayers are again going out on a limb to sell bonds to finance this for wealthy developers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2011
It's nice to know Sheila Dixon and the city of Baltimore weren't alone in showering favors on developer Ron Lipscomb. In a foreclosure sale just completed in May, Lipscomb lost a 4,000-square-foot Canton warehouse he'd hoped to redevelop. Real estate records for the property, at 2114 Cambridge St., indicate that Lipscomb's Doracon Contracting bought it in September 2005 for $640,000.  Three months later, Doracon sold the warehouse in what's described as an arms-length sale to Lipscomb for a low, low $144,633.
NEWS
December 9, 2010
Louis Miserendino's commentary regarding "special treatment for developers and sticking it to everyone else" in Baltimore ( "Fair taxes for all in Baltimore," Dec. 9) should include Baltimore County as well. Cutting down on special incentives would "reduce the temptation for developers and politicians to strike corrupt bargains. " While I concur with his reflection on this important and game changing issue, Baltimore County is not exempt from these special treatments for developers.
BUSINESS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
A prominent developer owes the city $1.5 million under terms of a loan agreement, but the city is letting him pay about a third of that, and is forfeiting a share of potential profits in the successful Promenade at Inner Harbor East apartment complex. John Paterakis of H&S Properties Development Corp. built the 113-unit apartment building, starting in 1995, with the help of a $1.49 million no-interest, 25-year loan. The loan is federal money administered by the city's Department of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2002
Baltimore County councilmen criticized yesterday a proposal to lease 32 acres of parkland to the Baltimore Ravens for a new training facility, calling it a "sweetheart deal" for the team, but said they will likely pass it anyway. Vincent J. Gardina, a Perry Hall Democrat, expressed the strongest opposition to the deal, saying he thought it was inappropriate to lease parkland to a for-profit business. "I think that's the issue that really stings here, that we have a private business ... locating here in a sweetheart deal in a public park, purchased with [state]
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Tom Pelton and Ivan Penn and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
After a heated, two-hour debate, the Board of Estimates approved a 75-year lease agreement -- criticized as a "sweetheart deal" for the Cordish Co. -- that will allow the developer to convert an almost vacant mall near the Inner Harbor into an entertainment complex.City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt urged newly sworn-in Mayor Martin O'Malley to postpone a vote on the $5 million revitalization project for a week until city officials more closely review details of the more than 90-page agreement.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | July 20, 1993
Do you wonder if Baltimore will get back in the National Football League?Do you wonder if this city's NFL expansion committee can sell 7,500 club seats and 100 private suites by Sept. 3 for a team that may never exist in a stadium that, if it's built, won't be ready until 1996?Of course you wonder. Every sports-minded Marylander does.After attending an information update yesterday at the Gallery at Harborplace, I'm starting to think we should be worrying about something else, namely:Will you be able to get tickets if we do get a team?
NEWS
July 21, 1998
World Cup victory struck a blow to xenophobiaThe nation of France was in a state of euphoria with the great gift she received just before Bastille Day by winning the World Cup title in soccer.What better way is there for a soccer-addicted population to celebrate its national holiday?The Sun's headline on July 13 proclaimed: "France drinks from cup as the champion of soccer."Amid the exultation, it behooves the citizens of the Gallic nation to reflect on its heritage and on its present-day political mood.
NEWS
September 21, 1999
Don't call it a sweetheart deal. The county and state moved swiftly, but properly, to locate the new Sweetheart Cup Co. Inc. distribution center at the Route 30 industrial site just south of the Hampstead town limits.Residents and the town council complain that the project was pushed through without adequate public comment. Yet only one person showed up to object at the advertised planning meeting. The council held a closed meeting with company representatives in March, and didn't take a position.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 7, 1999
Austrian linzer cookies owe much of their excellent flavor and unusually light texture to the main ingredient: nuts, typically hazelnuts (although some variations use almonds). Using 1 1/2 times the amount of finely ground nuts as flour creates a dough substantial enough to be handled easily and rich enough to bake up into meltingly tender cookies.Store nuts in the freezer to prevent their natural oil from becoming rancid and to make them easier to grind or chop uniformly. Unless a recipe states otherwise, always grind or chop the nuts before measuring them.
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