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November 26, 1992
Biospherics Inc. of Beltsville said yesterday that it would proceed without Pfizer Inc. to begin testing its low-calorie sweetener, D-tagatose, and that it hoped to market the product overseas within a couple years.After eight months evaluating the Biospherics product, Pfizer said the test results were encouraging, but that it would not go ahead developing the product as quickly as Biospherics wanted, said Gilbert V. Levin, president of the company.Biospherics said it had already made enough of the sweetener to begin tests in an industrial toxicology laboratory.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
In a surprising reversal, last week's losing bidder for 1st Mariner Bank got approval Tuesday to buy it — preserving the city's largest independent bank as a Baltimore-based institution. The group of investors, a mix of locals and out-of-state investment firms led by Priam Capital of New York, won over creditors with a last-minute offer to sweeten their deal. They agreed to pay about $17.7 million, $3 million of that up front as a deposit. That bid was roughly $4 million more than the value of competitor National Penn Bank's best offer.
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BUSINESS
By John Woodruff and John Woodruff,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
Stock in Beltsville-based Biospherics Inc. soared 72 percent yesterday, after the firm announced plans to sell a new low-calorie sweetener in overseas markets early next year.Vice President Lee R. Zehner said the plan became viable after the sweetener passed two testing milestones: creation of chocolate candies and spearmint chewing gums, and lab reports showing no toxic effects on animals that ate large amounts of it in addition to their normal diets.The stock shot up nearly 60 percent on the Nasdaq exchange within an hour after Mr. Zehner's announcement.
BUSINESS
The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
In the latest salvo in their protracted takeover battle, Men's Wearhouse said it might be willing to sweeten its bid for rival Jos. A. Bank Clothiers in a letter sent Thursday to Bank's independent directors. Men's Wearhouse urged the directors to form a special committee to reconsider its offer to buy Bank for $1.6 billion cash and begin negotiations. It said it might increase its $57.50-a-share offer for the Hampstead-based men's retailer if it found additional value during negotiations or due diligence.
BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
Biospherics Inc. of Beltsville took another step toward the first sale of its nonfattening sugar yesterday with its announcement that it had signed letters of intent with food distributors from Southeast Asia and Australia.Formal agreements are likely to follow sometime this year and will include initial purchase orders for the sweetener, D-tagatose, said Vice President Lee R. Zehner.The arrangements have been made with food distributors BODI Co. Ltd. of Bangkok and P.C. Wickham Pty Ltd. of Melbourne, Australia, and Mr. Zehner said the company expects to sign a letter with a third distributor later this week.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | April 9, 1991
Biospherics Inc. of Beltsville has patented a new process for making a sugar substitute that could make the sweetener cheaper to produce and raises hopes that it could compete in the potentially huge market for sugar substitutes used in commercial baked goods.Biospherics' stock soared yesterday after news of the patent appeared in Saturday's New York Times. But company President Gilbert Levin said Biospherics had actually disclosed the news last month, to little fanfare."We thought the news was out," he said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 9, 2009
As snowy white granules rain down on a cup of coffee, words appear across the TV screen: "Sprinkle your coffee with something other than guilt." Then, the narrator intones: "Try the first great-tasting, zero-calorie, natural sweetener borne from the leaves of the stevia plant. Truvia. Honestly sweet. Find it at your grocery store." It's not exactly pure spring water, but the newest sugar substitute on the market is getting buzz for its origins in flora rather than the lab. The Food and Drug Administration said in December that an extract of stevia was safe to eat, and about the same time, the food-supply giant Cargill Inc. launched the commercial for tabletop packets of Truvia.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Spherix Inc. traces its origins to outer space and its future fortunes, in part, to manure. So it isn't surprising that company President David Affeldt has learned to brace himself for wisecracks. "Are you guys as far up in orbit as Mars?" one smart aleck recently asked him as the two talked business. It doesn't help that its product offerings, while down to earth, can seem a wacky combination. At one end of Spherix's Beltsville headquarters, headset-wearing employees staff a call center, handling everything from questions about drugs for pharmaceutical companies to a state child-support hot line.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 27, 2000
Q. I recently came across a sweetener called stevia. The write-up suggests that this natural product would be a good sugar substitute for diabetics, but that seems too good to be true. What can you tell me about stevia? A. Stevia comes from a plant native to South America. The compounds it contains give it a sweet flavor prized by the Guarani Indians of Paraguay for centuries. Stevia has been used as a noncaloric sweetener in Japan for 25 years. There it appears in a range of foods, including soft drinks, ice cream, candy and desserts.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service F | October 6, 1991
Starting in the mid-80s, the classic jam formula of fruit and sugar was modified by some manufacturers to use fruit-juice concentrates instead of cane sugar as the sweetener. Fruit spreads, as these products are called, are now the fastest-growing part of the industry.It began with Richard Worth, an entrepreneur whose 1970s counterculture food philosophy inspired him to try making preserves without using refined sugar. He had fled the urban world to acres of wild blueberries in the rural Canadian province of New Brunswick.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
A war of words between Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. and Men's Wearhouse has only complicated a potential deal between the clothing titans. Hampstead-based Jos. A. Bank has offered $2.3 billion for Men's Wearhouse, and has continued to express interest despite being rebuffed. Meanwhile, the rival men's apparel chain is reportedly flirting with the acquisition of the upscale Allen Edmonds shoe maker. In dueling correspondence made public by the companies last week, the tension escalated.
HEALTH
By Elaine Pelc, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. The latest post is from Elaine Pelc. Browsing the baking aisle for sugar is no longer an easy venture. The sugar we are all used to is now surrounded by alternatives on the shelves. Figuring out what these products really are and how to use them can often be an overwhelming task.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
While the Sugar Association applauds efforts to combat childhood obesity, delivering 10 tons of sugar (or white sand as the case may be) to illustrate what people are putting in their bodies when they drink a soda unfortunately misses the mark, as does The Sun's headline: "Howard bans sales of sugary drinks on county property" (Dec. 12). Sugar is sucrose - the all-natural sweetener you keep on your kitchen counter, not the sweetener in most beverages. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 90 percent of all caloric sweetener used in beverages in the United States is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
EXPLORE
By Nikki Highsmith Vernick | May 30, 2012
Growing up in Texas, I played fast pitch softball. After playing in the hot Texas sun, our team, the Sweetpeas, had a snack of oranges and water, in containers brought from home. Today, my husband and I are new Howard County residents and we have gotten our children, ages 6 and 4, involved in sports activities, beginning with T-ball. We have been struck by the well-groomed baseball fields and the engaged volunteer parents. We were impressed with it all — until the post-game snacks came out. Over the last three weeks, these snacks have included chips, fruit roll-ups, sugary rice treats, chocolate-covered doughnuts with rainbow sprinkles, assorted fruit punch and sports drinks.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | December 8, 2011
By Maryland law, for the merger of Exelon and Constellation Energy to be permissible, it must be shown to cause no harm, and to benefit Baltimore Gas & Electric ratepayers and the public interest. Because, to date, Exelon has yet to offer a proposal that sufficiently meets these three thresholds, my administration cannot support the merger at this time. While the state of Maryland stands to lose 600 jobs post-merger, Constellation executives stand to make $34 million off the transaction.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
As Constellation Energy Group prepares to sell itself to Chicago-based Exelon, critics are advancing proposals to make the deal more palatable to Maryland customers. The state's consumer advocate is proposing a three-year freeze on rate increases after the merger to ease the transition to out-of-town ownership. The Maryland Energy Administration is questioning whether the $100 credit the companies have proposed for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers is enough, given the savings the companies expect to realize from the merger.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
While the Sugar Association applauds efforts to combat childhood obesity, delivering 10 tons of sugar (or white sand as the case may be) to illustrate what people are putting in their bodies when they drink a soda unfortunately misses the mark, as does The Sun's headline: "Howard bans sales of sugary drinks on county property" (Dec. 12). Sugar is sucrose - the all-natural sweetener you keep on your kitchen counter, not the sweetener in most beverages. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 90 percent of all caloric sweetener used in beverages in the United States is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1995
Biospherics Inc. said it continued its modest break into the black during the fourth quarter, as the Beltsville company boosted revenue from its information services division and prepared for the introduction of its D-tagatose sweetener in international markets.D-tagatose is a sugar made from whey, a little-used byproduct of cheesemaking. Unlike other low-calorie sweeteners, the product has about the same bulk as table sugar and can be used more readily in candies than other substitutes. The company said its sweetener's other advantage is that it does not break down when heated, making it potentially more useful for baking than competitors such as NutraSweet.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
A state panel sweetened the terms Wednesday for bids for the slots licenses in Baltimore and Rocky Gap. The states slots commission voted unanimously to give the winner of the Baltimore license a two-year window to decide whether to buy nearby land, instead of expecting the winner to buy the parcels up front, which officials said was implied in the existing terms. Land for a parking garage still would have to be purchased immediately. The recommendation was among several proposed by the quasi-public Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Baltimore officials are planning to sprinkle some sugar on the deal for a city casino by offering additional cash and assurances to potential developers. The new deal would allow the winning bidder to take up to $6 million from a pot of cash that was created to ease the impact of a casino on surrounding neighborhoods and apply the money to required infrastructure improvements, Deputy Mayor Kaliope Parthemos said Monday. The city also plans to give the casino operator more time to decide how much land it will need.
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