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NEWS
November 23, 2010
Behind Perdue's "home sweet home" facade is a vast, multinational corporation that for decades has kept the Chesapeake Bay on life support ("Perdue woos consumers with home, sweet home," Nov. 22). Perdue is an industrial-scale polluter of our cherished waterways. Governments should therefore impose industrial-scale clean-up requirements on Perdue and similar companies. Perdue owns many of the 568 million chickens raised every year on the Delmarva Peninsula. These half-billion birds generate 1.1 billion pounds of manure every year, which contributes to the annual dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Unfortunately, Perdue is not alone.
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NEWS
sheila.peter@verizon.net | August 12, 2013
"I felt so comfortable here that I never moved," explained Mildred Zeller, whose parents were original owners of a house in Rodgers Forge. Her parents moved to Dunkirk Road (second group of homes built by Keelty) in 1937 or 1938 and she was born a few years later. As you can imagine, the houses sold for a great deal less than they do today. Houses were $5,000 and only required a $250 down payment. Mildred said it only cost $500 to finish off the third floor with heat, hardwood floors and a cedar closet.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
— The unassuming farmhouse, with long-vacant chicken coops out back, has occupied a rural stretch of two-lane road for decades. Even now, after a facelift that gave it a fresh white clapboard exterior, bright red shutters and a rebuilt wraparound porch, the house built by Arthur W. Perdue offers no outward clue to its role in the birth of a multibillion-dollar poultry and agribusiness conglomerate. It was there that he started a small egg business in 1920. The rest is Delmarva history.
EXPLORE
February 17, 2013
Living in Baltimore City can feel like an uphill effort. The noise, trash, potholes, property taxes and looming deficit are depressing. We live near Roland Avenue and Cold Spring Lane, a major east-west thoroughfare that has turned into a pulsating, trash-filled highway. People open car windows to throw out trash. Students at the bus stop drop wrappers and drink cans. They walk up the street and throw more into the bushes. The wind sweeps wrappers uphill from Falls Road. A few weeks ago, in a regular ritual, my husband spent three hours picking up trash on the median and sides of Cold Spring Lane.
NEWS
sheila.peter@verizon.net | August 12, 2013
"I felt so comfortable here that I never moved," explained Mildred Zeller, whose parents were original owners of a house in Rodgers Forge. Her parents moved to Dunkirk Road (second group of homes built by Keelty) in 1937 or 1938 and she was born a few years later. As you can imagine, the houses sold for a great deal less than they do today. Houses were $5,000 and only required a $250 down payment. Mildred said it only cost $500 to finish off the third floor with heat, hardwood floors and a cedar closet.
EXPLORE
February 17, 2013
Living in Baltimore City can feel like an uphill effort. The noise, trash, potholes, property taxes and looming deficit are depressing. We live near Roland Avenue and Cold Spring Lane, a major east-west thoroughfare that has turned into a pulsating, trash-filled highway. People open car windows to throw out trash. Students at the bus stop drop wrappers and drink cans. They walk up the street and throw more into the bushes. The wind sweeps wrappers uphill from Falls Road. A few weeks ago, in a regular ritual, my husband spent three hours picking up trash on the median and sides of Cold Spring Lane.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - Heavy equipment tore into a brick motel at the edge of a Gettysburg battlefield yesterday, removing the last commercial enterprise from the site of one of the best-known, if disastrous, maneuvers in the history of war. The demolition of the Home Sweet Home Motel - for years a goal of the National Park Service and preservation groups - began when a 40-foot backhoe dodged piles of snow to knock the back off one of the five buildings that...
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
Thirty Naval Academy seniors will perform for the last time tomorrow on a Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium field that hasn't exactly been home, sweet home.And nobody -- not the head coach nor the players -- can pinpoint the reason the Midshipmen have not won in their own house since Oct. 17, 1998, when Division I-AA Colgate was a 42-35 victim, or beaten a Division I-A opponent since Sept. 19 of last year when Navy overcame a Kent team about to launch the nation's longest losing streak.Home cooking has left Navy starving for a win in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 22, 1995
Winslow Homer stands at the summit of American art, as the National Gallery's grand new show of his work once again proves. In his own time a century ago, he was recognized as one of the greatest American artists -- and so he is recognized today.His work has many faces: Civil War battlefront scenes, postwar genre paintings, watercolors from the tropics, environmental protest images, grandly heroic and tragic sea paintings. Among all these, there are greater and lesser individual works, but he was always an artist of uncommon depth.
FEATURES
September 27, 2002
Starring Reese Witherspoon Directed by Andy Tennant Rated PG-13 (some language,sexual references) Released by Touchstone Pictures Time 102 minutes
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | December 25, 2011
Irving Berlin wrote "White Christmas," one of the biggest-selling songs of all time, with tongue planted firmly in cheek. Although the wistful tune soothed homesick soldiers in such God-awful places as Guadalcanal more than half a century ago, and no doubt it still plays in Kandahar today, Berlin most likely wrote what he called "the best song that anybody's ever written" somewhere in the sunny Southwest, probably while sitting by a swanky hotel swimming...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | June 7, 2011
An overlooked song from an overlooked album finally gets a video. “Home Sweet Home,” the Lloyd Banks/Pusha-T collaboration from Banks’ H.F.M. 2 , goes down a gritty alley of bleak black-and-white shots of New York City. The video doesn’t show us anything we haven’t seen (Blunt ashes! A dice game! NYPD!), but “Home Sweet Home” is, above all else, a display of chilling rap bars. Banks, a gifted wordsmith in love with internal rhyme schemes, and an invigorated Pusha-T create a contrast of styles.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
Behind Perdue's "home sweet home" facade is a vast, multinational corporation that for decades has kept the Chesapeake Bay on life support ("Perdue woos consumers with home, sweet home," Nov. 22). Perdue is an industrial-scale polluter of our cherished waterways. Governments should therefore impose industrial-scale clean-up requirements on Perdue and similar companies. Perdue owns many of the 568 million chickens raised every year on the Delmarva Peninsula. These half-billion birds generate 1.1 billion pounds of manure every year, which contributes to the annual dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Unfortunately, Perdue is not alone.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
— The unassuming farmhouse, with long-vacant chicken coops out back, has occupied a rural stretch of two-lane road for decades. Even now, after a facelift that gave it a fresh white clapboard exterior, bright red shutters and a rebuilt wraparound porch, the house built by Arthur W. Perdue offers no outward clue to its role in the birth of a multibillion-dollar poultry and agribusiness conglomerate. It was there that he started a small egg business in 1920. The rest is Delmarva history.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
When the 10-game homestand started with a victory early last week, the Orioles were seven games under .500 with an upcoming stretch that allowed them to still harbor thoughts of a winning season. They were just five days removed from enjoying back-to-back series wins over the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees, an uplifting run that factored in the club's decision to extend the contract of manager Dave Trembley through next season. But when the homestand came to a merciful end last night and the players headed to the team bus - a road trip never before so welcomed - there was no distancing themselves from perhaps one of the worst on-field stretches in the 54-year history of the franchise.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
Lexington is a handsome little village with good buildings. - Isaac Burr, traveling in Virginia in 1804 The night was dark, the narrow country road deserted. The lights from the few houses along the way looked like distant stars. I'd never been to Clark's Lumber Yard, but I'd heard things got hopping out there on Friday nights. The Saw Mill Band, led by 82-year-old Bruce Clark, started playing at 7:30 p.m., and the dancing started at 7:31. Or so I'd been told. Quite frankly, I couldn't imagine anything "hopping" down this remote road, 15 miles north of Lexington, Va., in rural Rockbridge County, except maybe a frog or two. But then again, the Lexington area can surprise you. Bluegrass and Bach mix comfortably here, and visitors will find a thriving intellectual community in the midst of a gorgeous rural setting.
NEWS
By RICHARD W. SMITH | September 16, 1992
For 30 years, I driven north on Dulaney Valley Road and crossed to Eastridge. Behind me has always been the rapidly changing landscape of commercial Towson. Ahead of me has always been the virtually constant landscape of the tract developments of modest residential housing.To the south, apartment and office towers have spouted, a monster mall has been built and the Towson of 30 years ago has been all but obliterated. Traffic roars.Once I have made the turn into Eastridge an unchanging landscape stretches ahead for several miles.
NEWS
By RENE PARENT | September 16, 1992
I've lived in Baltimore city since 1971. I've worked in Baltimore County, also since 1971. This makes me an expert on the differences between city and county.In 1971, I was a young guy fresh out of college and ready to make my way in the world. I took an apartment in town mainly to be near my girlfriend. I've had plenty of opportunities to get out since then, but for some reason I'm still living within city limits.I'm not in the same apartment, of course. Now I live in my own house, in a city neighborhood that has most of the amenities one would expect in a nice area of Carroll or Harford County, at only about twice the cost.
NEWS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
Anne Arundel County has always been a desirable place to live. Located in proximity to Baltimore and Washington, the county offers miles of beautiful shorelines and an area rich in history and culture. Lobbyists, movers-and-shakers in the business world, Navy personnel and cadets and, of course, the governor of Maryland all live in Anne Arundel's most well-known city of Annapolis. But not everyone can afford a waterfront property or a home on the National Historic Register, and there is plenty of charm to be found in smaller communities elsewhere in the county.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - Heavy equipment tore into a brick motel at the edge of a Gettysburg battlefield yesterday, removing the last commercial enterprise from the site of one of the best-known, if disastrous, maneuvers in the history of war. The demolition of the Home Sweet Home Motel - for years a goal of the National Park Service and preservation groups - began when a 40-foot backhoe dodged piles of snow to knock the back off one of the five buildings that...
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