Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSweet Corn
IN THE NEWS

Sweet Corn

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Carrie Madren | October 4, 2010
Crowning summer cookouts, ears of local corn are hot weather staples. Roasted on a grill, splashed with butter and sprinkled in salt and pepper — and in Chesapeake Country, Old Bay, of course — corn makes barbecues complete. This essential summer side dish may be in danger, however, if global warming continues to incrementally warm our Mid-Atlantic region. Corn, which prefers growing at about 50 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit, will feel the effects from hotter temperatures and more destructive storms, pests, weeds, diseases and ozone pollution.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Letter to The Record and The Aegis | July 2, 2013
Editor: I lift the lid off the writhing pot on my stove and inhale deeply. The aroma of Old Bay seasoning and the briny crab reaches my nose, a smell so familiar and so comforting. Their bright red bodies smeared wholly with that special seasoning wipes away the fact that a mere hour earlier the pots contents were in a cooler on the floor, scratching and pinching, and blue. Placing the lid carefully back down, I turn my attention to the sweet corn, its smell dispersing through the kitchen alarming those present it is ready to be eaten, the broth milky and corn silk floating along in a one note soup.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 23, 2006
As a sure sign of summer, roadside produce markets dot the landscape across Maryland, with sweet corn on the cob often the item that is most in demand. In many cases, corn bought at farmers' markets or roadside stands has been plucked from stalks that same day. Though the supply is adequate, farmers and state officials are warning that sweet corn may become scarce later in the season, especially around Labor Day. And any shortage will be blamed on the cloud-busting storms that raked much of Maryland at the end of last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Sweet corn is at its seasonal peak, and its abundance is a great (and inexpensive) reason to get cooking. Sweet corn has a place in every cookout this time of year, whether in a salad, a side dish or, more likely, on the cob with butter and salt and pepper (or better yet, Old Bay). Jesse Albright, general manager at Albright farms in Monkton, sells sweet corn at the Fells Point Farmers' Market for $6 a dozen and offers preservation techniques for those of us who like to have a little bit of summer during the winter months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Sweet corn is at its seasonal peak, and its abundance is a great (and inexpensive) reason to get cooking. Sweet corn has a place in every cookout this time of year, whether in a salad, a side dish or, more likely, on the cob with butter and salt and pepper (or better yet, Old Bay). Jesse Albright, general manager at Albright farms in Monkton, sells sweet corn at the Fells Point Farmers' Market for $6 a dozen and offers preservation techniques for those of us who like to have a little bit of summer during the winter months.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
In corn-crazy Maryland, especially in corn-rich August, the sweet-corn disciples have worshiped for years at the throne of the exalted corn queen. The queen, of course, was Silver Queen.But a quiet revolution has swept the kingdom of corn. Silver Queen, that elegant cob of succulent white kernels, no longer reigns. "She's been dethroned," declares Tony Evans, a spokesman for the state Department of Agriculture. "She's the queen in name only."That name, "Silver Queen," still denotes royalty with some Marylanders -- good, white, sweet corn -- even though it has not been queen for perhaps a decade.
FEATURES
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
Cool, rainy days may have dampened some plans this summer, but the weather helped produce a bountiful crop of Maryland sweet corn that can be enjoyed at this weekend's Labor Day picnics. "It has been an excellent year for sweet corn," said Steve Weber, who sells corn and other seasonal vegetables at his farm stand on Proctor Lane in Carney. "Cool nights make sweet corn," he said. Also, when corn grows fast, as it has this summer, it has less time to be attacked by pests. "It's the best it's ever been," said Michael Rork, owner and chef at Town Dock Restaurant in St. Michaels.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | February 7, 2001
1999 "Hugel" Cuvee les Amours Pinot Blanc ($12). This vibrant young white wine from the French region of Alsace offers refreshing flavors of pear, lemon, coconut, minerals and sweet corn. Made in a popular style, it doesn't try to emulate the thickest, richest pinot blancs. It's more of a light, celebratory wine to serve with seafood, quiche or to be simply sipped by itself.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | June 22, 2008
Ah, sweet corn on the cob - a summertime treat for most Marylanders - is best straight from the field. It is the freshness that ensures that the kernels have their ephemeral sweet taste and juiciness. And that is what adds to the popularity of corn at farmers' markets and roadside stands across the state. The first pickings of sweet corn are just beginning to show up on pickup trucks or wagons parked at the end of farm lanes. In addition to being a treat for consumers, the crop is a benefit to farmers.
NEWS
April 28, 1991
The Carroll Soil Conservation District Board members have congratulated Bill Buchman for his dedication to soil conservation and water quality.Bill Buchman and his wife own and operate a vegetable and grain farm on Coon Club Road here.Bill also manages eight greenhouses and about 600 acres, in whichhe grows pumpkins, sweet corn, field corn and soybeans.About 35 percent of Bill's rented fields have been contoured by the Carroll Soil Conservation District, and nearly all row crops are planted using no-till.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | February 27, 2012
Back in 1988, newlyweds and Harford County natives Paula and Tom Harman decided they wanted to grow two acres of sweet corn and about 50 tomato plants on their home farm in Churchville. The fruits of their labor were more than two people could eat, so they set up a little cart along the side of the road. “We sold corn and tomatoes. Unbelievably, people came to us,” says Paula. “Each year after that, we grew a little bit more and expanded the variety of what we grew.” Thus, Harman's Farm Market was born.
NEWS
By Carrie Madren | October 4, 2010
Crowning summer cookouts, ears of local corn are hot weather staples. Roasted on a grill, splashed with butter and sprinkled in salt and pepper — and in Chesapeake Country, Old Bay, of course — corn makes barbecues complete. This essential summer side dish may be in danger, however, if global warming continues to incrementally warm our Mid-Atlantic region. Corn, which prefers growing at about 50 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit, will feel the effects from hotter temperatures and more destructive storms, pests, weeds, diseases and ozone pollution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2009
Every so often, a restaurant opens so successfully, is embraced so universally, that you can only figure that it's filling a deep, communal need. Miss Shirley's arrival in Roland Park a few years ago was such a case. It seemed that more than almost anything, Baltimore desperately wanted an upscale and Southern-style breakfast- and lunch-only restaurant, one that maintained a homey and cheerful ambience while adding New American panache to traditional morning-time recipes. We're talking things like French toast stuffed with coconut cream, flaked coconut and bruleed bananas; eggs Benedict served on top of cakes made from shredded potatoes or sweet corn; and deviled eggs stuffed with jumbo lump crab meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 28, 2008
Have you been following Slow Food Baltimore's Eat in Season Challenge? If it ended up producing nothing except this crazily cream and corntastic dish from Donna's chef Andy Thomas and sous-chef Brian Price, it would have been worth it. Thomas used local cream, too, in this silky smooth dish, and the basil was just the rough edge it needed. Donna's whole Eat in Season menu was admirable (but succotash without corn - sacre bleu!), and they've promised to try to keep the corn pudding (or is it a flan?
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | June 22, 2008
Ah, sweet corn on the cob - a summertime treat for most Marylanders - is best straight from the field. It is the freshness that ensures that the kernels have their ephemeral sweet taste and juiciness. And that is what adds to the popularity of corn at farmers' markets and roadside stands across the state. The first pickings of sweet corn are just beginning to show up on pickup trucks or wagons parked at the end of farm lanes. In addition to being a treat for consumers, the crop is a benefit to farmers.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 2006
Bob Clark Produce stand operator Hereford Age --73 Salary --He averages $250 a week. Years on the job --Seven How he got started --Clark worked as a machine operator with Black & Decker for 37 years, then took care of animals on a farm for seven years. Baltimore County farmer Herman Kupisch asked him if he'd be interested in working a produce stand during the summer, so Clark decided to give it a try. Typical day --He opens the stand on Mount Carmel Road just west of Interstate 83 at 10 a.m. and stays until about 6 p.m., rain or shine.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 27, 1994
Say hallelujah and pass the butter! The sweet corn has arrived.I had a couple ears of corn Sunday that were so sweet that eating them had me curling my toes with delight. There I was, barefoot in the the kitchen, attacking two pieces of sweet corn. I was in such a frenzy, the corn cobs moved like the carriages of a typewriter -- left, right, return.All I knew about the corn was that the kernels were white and it was delicious. But after talking with Ronald Sewell, the Taneytown farmer who grew the corn, and with a couple other farmers -- John Selby in Centreville and Pam Pahl in Woodstock -- I got a quick education on the sweet corn scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 28, 2008
Have you been following Slow Food Baltimore's Eat in Season Challenge? If it ended up producing nothing except this crazily cream and corntastic dish from Donna's chef Andy Thomas and sous-chef Brian Price, it would have been worth it. Thomas used local cream, too, in this silky smooth dish, and the basil was just the rough edge it needed. Donna's whole Eat in Season menu was admirable (but succotash without corn - sacre bleu!), and they've promised to try to keep the corn pudding (or is it a flan?
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 23, 2006
As a sure sign of summer, roadside produce markets dot the landscape across Maryland, with sweet corn on the cob often the item that is most in demand. In many cases, corn bought at farmers' markets or roadside stands has been plucked from stalks that same day. Though the supply is adequate, farmers and state officials are warning that sweet corn may become scarce later in the season, especially around Labor Day. And any shortage will be blamed on the cloud-busting storms that raked much of Maryland at the end of last month.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
Gerard Campbell, executive chef at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore, says Wild King Salmon With Applewood Smoked Bacon and Corn Hash is one of his biggest sellers. The recipe is for a single serving, he says, "so it could easily be adjusted to the amount of servings." WILD KING SALMON WITH APPLEWOOD SMOKED BACON AND CORN HASH MAKES 1 SERVING two 7-ounce King Salmon fillets salt and pepper to taste 3 ounces diced applewood smoked bacon 2 tablespoons diced white onion 1 / 2 cup fresh yellow corn (cut from ear)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.