Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSwedes
IN THE NEWS

Swedes

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 1995
TUZLA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- While thousands of U.S. soldiers wait in their barracks in Germany, in railway cars in Hungary and on the wrong side of a river in Croatia, all to great fanfare, a few hundred Swedes are quietly making important strides for NATO peacekeeping in the so-called American sector of Bosnia.The Swedes have cleared mines, set up crossing points at confrontation lines, opened roads for free movement, presided over an exchange of 200 prisoners of war and, perhaps most important, they've ventured into streets and cafes to break the ice with a tough audience of wary Bosnian Serbs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 11, 2010
Mr. Ray Nilsson died in an upstairs bedroom in my house early Monday morning around 2:35 a.m., which was nothing he or I contemplated back when I married his daughter, but life takes us down some mighty interesting roads. If he'd had his choice, he probably would've died in the woods around his log cabin in northern Wisconsin, ax in hand, splitting wood — a big whump in the chest and the sky spins and you fall off the planet — or in his library, reading American history and listening to Schubert, or maybe in Sweden, walking around and listening to the beautiful language of his mother and, Whump, get run over by a Volvo.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By HELENE ELLIOTT and HELENE ELLIOTT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- This one was for the old guys, the group that ripped away the "chicken Swede" label their predecessors had born and proved that Swedes could win battles in the corners of an NHL rink and any corner of the world. It was for Mats Sundin, 35, the first European player chosen first overall in the NHL draft, in 1989. For Peter Forsberg, 32, who has given his spleen and his knee cartilage in service of his hockey career. For Nicklas Lidstrom, 35, a defenseman of quiet brilliance and big-game performances.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
Anna Nordqvist might be a rookie on the LPGA tour, but she's already showing a flair for the dramatic and a touch of the clutch. For the second straight day, the 22-year-old Swede sank a long birdie putt on her final hole. For the second straight day, it was the margin at the top of the leader board in the McDonald's LPGA Championship. After waiting out a two-hour, 20-minute rain delay, and with darkness approaching at Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, Nordqvist rolled in a 20-foot putt on the 15th hole to wrestle the lead from Lindsey Wright.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 2003
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - As thousands of Swedes continued to pay tribute to Anna Lindh, the foreign minister who was fatally stabbed at a Stockholm department store on Wednesday, the police said they might have a videotape showing her killer. The police had initially said that there was no closed-circuit television footage of the area where Lindh was attacked, but they acknowledged yesterday that they were studying a tape taken from the floor above. The store is made up of galleries around a central atrium.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 22, 1992
MERIBEL, France -- You go to a hockey game and you don't figure an Oliver Stone movie is going to break out. It happened yesterday, though. The Americans lost to the Russians and blamed it on a conspiracy.The Swedes did it. That was the conspiracy. The Swedes got us, not the Russians.Don't buy another Volvo, people. Forget Iraq. Forget Japan. We have seen the enemy and it is . . . Sweden."The Swedish hockey team couldn't beat us, but a Swedish referee sure did," said Clark Donatelli, captain of the U.S. team, after the 5-2 loss to the Russians, now the Unified Team, in the Olympic semifinals.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 11, 2010
Mr. Ray Nilsson died in an upstairs bedroom in my house early Monday morning around 2:35 a.m., which was nothing he or I contemplated back when I married his daughter, but life takes us down some mighty interesting roads. If he'd had his choice, he probably would've died in the woods around his log cabin in northern Wisconsin, ax in hand, splitting wood — a big whump in the chest and the sky spins and you fall off the planet — or in his library, reading American history and listening to Schubert, or maybe in Sweden, walking around and listening to the beautiful language of his mother and, Whump, get run over by a Volvo.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | November 17, 1991
Sweden, which once trod its own path between East and West, now seeks to join the European Community.Known for decades as "the middle way" between East and West -- between collectivism and individualism -- Sweden is shifting. Now that the confrontation between communism and capitalism is dissipating, this Nordic nation is trying to find its place.The new government of Prime Minister Carl Bildt -- ushered in with the Conservatives' historic victory in September's national elections -- signals the change.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
LAKE ORION, Mich. -- Helen Alfredsson turned the first round of the 49th U.S. Women's Open into a one-woman demolition derby at Indianwood Golf and Country Club yesterday.Alfredsson, 29, reeled off eight birdies in posting a 32-3163 over the 6,244-yard, par-71 course. It elevated her name to the highest level of single-round scoring in a major championship, man or woman, a level previously reserved for the likes of Nicklaus, Norman, Miller and Sheehan."When you're shooting a good score, sometimes you don't realize it," the Swedish star said.
SPORTS
September 3, 1991
MONTREAL -- Tomas Sandstrom's slap shot with 3 minutes, 54 seconds remaining gave Sweden a 3-2 victory yesterday over the Soviet Union, which, with its second consecutive defeat, was in danger of failing to make the medal round in the Canada Cup hockey tournament.The Swedes, meanwhile, revived their hopes after an opening-game loss to the United States.Trailing by 2-0 after two periods, the Soviets tied it on goals by Alexei Zhamnov and Alexander Semak.Then Thomas Steen sent Sandstrom in on a counterattack down the left side, and he sent a slap shot past goaltender Mikhail Shtalenkov.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 27, 2006
When we split up in 1982, I thought this was it. I thought you would hear an ABBA song played every here and there and now and then, but not any more than that."
SPORTS
By HELENE ELLIOTT and HELENE ELLIOTT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- This one was for the old guys, the group that ripped away the "chicken Swede" label their predecessors had born and proved that Swedes could win battles in the corners of an NHL rink and any corner of the world. It was for Mats Sundin, 35, the first European player chosen first overall in the NHL draft, in 1989. For Peter Forsberg, 32, who has given his spleen and his knee cartilage in service of his hockey career. For Nicklas Lidstrom, 35, a defenseman of quiet brilliance and big-game performances.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
From the moment Annika Sorenstam began distancing herself from the rest of the field at the $1.8 million McDonald's LPGA Championship at Bulle Rock Golf Course in Havre de Grace, everyone there seemed to be thinking ahead to next week's U.S. Women's Open. Everyone except Sorenstam, that is. "I worked hard for this and I want to enjoy it," Sorenstam, 34, said after finishing off a three-shot victory over amateur sensation Michelle Wie to become the first LPGA player in 19 years to win the first two legs of the Grand Slam.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2005
If yesterday's final round of the $1.8 million McDonald's LPGA Championship was merely about golf, it might be remembered more for what didn't happen than for what did. Few on the leader board made much of a move and nobody threatened Annika Sorenstam's march to her ninth major championship. Except for the battle to finish second, there was little drama on a hot and breezy afternoon at Bulle Rock Golf Course. Sorenstam saw a five-shot lead going into the day bulge to eight by the turn before she settled for a three-stroke victory over teenage phenom Michelle Wie. As often is the case with Sorenstam, history superseded hype.
NEWS
By E.A. Torriero and E.A. Torriero,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 2004
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba - As the United States freed the first detainee since last week's Supreme Court ruling that such individuals have a right to take their cases to court, the Navy secretary arrived here yesterday to oversee a process that could result in the release of dozens more prisoners in coming weeks. Mehdi-Muhammed Ghezali, a 25-year-old Swede, was whisked away under heavy security by a Swedish charter plane in the middle of the night. He was captured in Pakistan in the company of Taliban fighters in 2001 and had been held in secret since January 2002.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
On Union Avenue in Havre de Grace, most of one block's restored two-story homes are marked by the sign of Ken Beyer's Crazy Swede. The burgundy, tan and green signs announce a growing guest-suite business, which Beyer began in 1999 when he took over the Crazy Swede bar and restaurant. Since then, he has worked his way down the block, buying derelict houses, creating his own urban renewal project along the way. Beyer, 47, has invested $3 million to purchase six houses and an old hotel, restoring the 19th- and early-20th-century buildings to their glories, down to the original leather wainscoting.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 9, 1991
NEW YORK -- Stefan Edberg was always the stranger in this strange land of hard courts, harsh crowds, made-for-television schedules and screeching subway trains. The U.S. Open tortured him, played tricks with him, defeated him. Home was Wimbledon, a place with grass and royals and history and silence.But yesterday, Edberg made one last stand at trying to conquer Flushing Meadow. The 25-year-old from Sweden brought a high-kicking monster of a serve and a gorgeous volley into Louis Armstrong Stadium.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1995
PARIS -- It was a bad combination: On a stormy day, a stormy guy found himself upset in the opening round of the French Open in a carbon copy of his premature exits from the Australian and U.S. opens.Three sets and out went fourth-seeded Goran Ivanisevic, and then the melodramatic Croatian threatened to break all of his rackets. Then he threatened to quit tennis.Then he promised to calm down, take a 10-day vacation, and tTC check back into Grand Slam tournament contention in time for Wimbledon, where his thunderclap serve has taken him to two finals in the past three years.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - When Anna Jerkovics and Mia Rotberg got married in Stockholm's stone-towered city hall in 2001, it was a bit of a shock to their friends. Not because they both are women. But because they chose to marry at all. "None of our friends, gay couples or straight couples, with children or without children, was married," says Rotberg, 34, a preschool teacher. "We were the first. We feel very grown up." Gay marriage, which has emerged as a volatile and divisive issue in the United States and its presidential politics, has evolved with far less heat and noise in Sweden.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.