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NEWS
November 10, 2011
It was with great interest that I read John Houser III's review of the Grand Cru in Belvedere Square ("Fine wines, fair small plates at Grand Cru," Nov. 3). Having been there several times myself, I wholeheartedly agree with his recommendations. There is however, a glaring error in his text, one which reflects poorly on our knowledge of regional cuisine and culture and only reinforces the belief that Americans have no clue when it comes to anything outside our borders. In this day and age of the Internet, how can it be possible to refer to raclette as a "Swedish classic"?
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SPORTS
Sports on TV | September 7, 2013
SATURDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS F1 Italian Grand Prix, Qualifying NBCSN8 a.m. NASCAR Sprint Cup: Federated Auto Parts 400 2, 77:30 MLB White Sox@Orioles 45, 51 Washington@Miami MASN7 Pittsburgh@St. Louis MLB7 Washington@Miami (T) MASN11:30 WNBA Connecticut@Indiana NBA7 Boxing Seth Mitchell vs. Chris Arreola SHOW10:25 Euro. PGA Omega Euro. Masters, 3rd Round (T)
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NEWS
June 17, 1991
Two decades ago, Britain was seeking membership in the European Community while demanding changes in its terms. Sweden's late Prime Minister Olof Palme told a reporter for this newspaper that Sweden, in contrast, could accept all the terms of the EC's Treaty of Rome, but not the preamble. Neutrality forbade it. And that neutrality, the cornerstone of Sweden's national policy, was a balancing act. Sweden was acutely interested in what it was balancing between.Sweden's decision to apply for membership in the European Community is a testimonial that the balance of Europe is gone, leaving Sweden little to be neutral about.
NEWS
May 18, 2013
Doesn't anyone in this country know the difference between communism and socialism? Russia had communism, or whatever it is called now, and Sweden has socialism. I have been to both places and they are not the same by any means. Sweden has its share of CEOs who are millionaires (Ikea, Volvo), and the rest of the population lives quite well. (They have a good national health care program, too.) Russia has millionaires, too, but the majority of the people struggle to make a decent living.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 11, 1994
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- For nearly 79 minutes, this was the kind of game FIFA had been desperately trying to hide. No goals, and three, four and sometimes five players hanging back on the defensive end.And then it became a historic game in the world's largest sporting event, great until the last shot.Sweden midfielder Henrik Larsson scored in the lower right corner in a sudden-death penalty shootout, and then goalie Thomas Ravelli knocked down a shot by defender Miodrag Belodedici as the Swedes won a 5-4 sudden-death penalty shootout against Romania in a World Cup '94 quarterfinal.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- One young girl had trouble seeing the blackboard. Her teachers concluded that she was mentally retarded. In accordance with the nation's law, she was sterilized. Later, it was discovered that she suffered from nothing more than bad eyesight.What barbaric regime perpetrated such an atrocity? It was Sweden, the very model of progressive socialism.Between 1934 and 1974, 62,000 Swedes were sterilized, often against their will, for a variety of reasons. Many, like the girl who couldn't see the blackboard, were considered mentally inferior.
NEWS
September 20, 1991
Nothing came of the last "bourgeois" party government in Sweden, which lasted from 1976 to 1982. That shaky coalition never created a program to alter the Swedish consensus on welfare socialism, which the ousted Social Democrats had achieved. This time, with a center-right array of parties once more displacing the traditional ruling party, the same could recur. Or it might end the Western world's most generous and simultaneously stifling welfare state.The drubbing of the Social Democrats in Sunday's election was expected.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 14, 1994
STOCKHOLM, Sweden -- At the end of a long and emotional campaign, Sweden yesterday voted solidly to abandon its Arctic isolation and join the European Union.Sweden's approval follows similar yes votes in Austria and Finland this year and is expected to give a boost to a referendum at the end of the month in neighboring Norway, where opposition has been strong.The addition of all four countries would make the EU the world's largest and richest free-trade bloc, surpassing North America, and could help speed the integration of the Eastern and Central European countries hoping to join.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 1997
KAREN ARNOLD'S maternal grandparents immigrated to the United States from Sweden in the early 1900s.Nearly a century later, the Clary's Forest resident has returned to their homeland.Arnold, a poet with a doctorate in English, is teaching a course in modern American poetry this fall at the University of Lund.She went over in July to visit family. She plans to return home in December.While in Sweden, Arnold will work on translations of 19th-century Swedish women's diaries, a project she began on an earlier visit.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke departed yesterday for Stockholm, Sweden, where he plans to lay the groundwork for a Baltimore bid to play host to the Olympics in 2012.Before leaving, Schmoke said he had set up a meeting with the Sweden Olympic Committee, which is hoping to win the 2004 Summer Games for Stockholm.The chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, John A. Moag Jr., will join Schmoke in what the mayor described as an "informal information exchange" on Sweden's experience in navigating the site-selection process.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Baltimore police Maj. Melissa Hyatt, commander of police's Central District, was accepted into a three-week United Nations training program in Sweden with other law enforcement officials from across the world. Hyatt, 37, said she is the only American participating in this year's United Nations Police Commanders Course, which takes place April 8 - 26, with police officers from around the world. The course, directed by the Swedish National Bureau of Investigation and the Swedish Armed Forces International Centre, focuses on “intercultural leadership” using many of the same training UN military officers undergo, according to a course description.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Doctors in America told Chris Lyles a cancerous tumor on his windpipe was inoperable, but he and his family wouldn't take no for an answer. They wrote surgeons all over the world, pleading for someone to take his case. Then during an Internet search, Lyles' brother-in-law stumbled upon a doctor in Sweden who recently implanted a synthetic trachea in a man in Eritrea. They sent an email to Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, who replied with words they had been waiting months to hear: "I can help you. " Macchiarini performed the surgery, making 30-year-old Lyles of Abingdon the second person in the world, and the first American, to have a synthetic trachea implanted.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
It was with great interest that I read John Houser III's review of the Grand Cru in Belvedere Square ("Fine wines, fair small plates at Grand Cru," Nov. 3). Having been there several times myself, I wholeheartedly agree with his recommendations. There is however, a glaring error in his text, one which reflects poorly on our knowledge of regional cuisine and culture and only reinforces the belief that Americans have no clue when it comes to anything outside our borders. In this day and age of the Internet, how can it be possible to refer to raclette as a "Swedish classic"?
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 28, 2010
Former Loyola soccer player Sarra Moller , now a Greyhounds assistant coach, has signed a contract to play for Kvarnsvedens IK, a professional women's soccer team in Sweden. Moller is the first Loyola women's soccer player to play professionally overseas. Moller concluded her college playing career in 2008 by earning All-Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference first-team honors for the fourth consecutive year. She was the conference's Defensive Player of the Year during her freshman and senior seasons.
SPORTS
December 28, 2009
Former Hart Trophy winner Peter Forsberg is on defending champion Sweden's Olympic squad for the 2010 Vancouver Games. The veteran center was selected for the 23-man Olympic team announced Sunday by coach Bengt-Ake Gustafsson. Forsberg won two Stanley Cups with the Avalanche and was the NHL's MVP in 2003. He plays for Swedish team Modo but has dealt with nagging ankle and foot problems for several years. Gustafsson said he is not worried about Forsberg's injuries going into the Olympics.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
What's the best place in the world to be a mother? According to Save the Children, which compared the well-being of mothers and children in 146 countries, it's Sweden. On the other hand, there won't be too many happy Mother's Days this year in Niger, which ranked last among countries surveyed on measures of maternal and child health and well-being. Consider this comparison between the two nations: Skilled health personnel are present at almost every birth in Sweden, while only 33 percent of births are attended in Niger.
SPORTS
September 1, 1991
PITTSBURGH -- Team USA, relying on strategy drawn up hours before by seriously ill coach Bob Johnson, got its first two goals from Jeremy Roenick within a span of 2 minutes, 8 seconds in the first period and defeated world champion Sweden, 6-3, in the Canada Cup yesterday.The U.S. team built a 5-0 lead midway through the second period, then survived three third-period goals by Sweden, two within 16 seconds by Kjell Samuelsson and Charles Berglund.Just a day after undergoing emergency surgery to remove a life-threatening brain tumor, Johnson designed the USA's lineup and strategy to combat world champion Sweden's physical forechecking.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 18, 1991
Stockholm -- Sweden's governing Social Democrats face a serious challenge in the general election which comes in the fall, a result of the fact that the Swedish model of society -- the famous ''third way'' between communism and capitalism -- no longer commands the electoral majorities it did and no longer produces the economic success of the past.The Social Democrats are in an intellectual as well as political crisis. They have no substitute or successor to the Swedish model of the welfare state they created in the 1920s and 1930s, to international acclaim.
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