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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
With the Duke basketball team riding high and consumers snapping up apparel bearing the university's name, Duke University plans to announce a far-reaching code of conduct tomorrow to ensure that products bearing its name are not made in sweatshops.Duke students and anti-sweatshop groups applauded the code because it goes further than any other university code and will likely be copied by other colleges. Duke has one of the most popular names on sports gear and has 700 licensees that make apparel at hundreds of plants in the United States and in more than 10 other countries.
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NEWS
September 26, 2011
I feel compelled to address the issues discussed in Erica Green 's recent article specific to Roland Park Elementary/Middle School ("Roland Park parents push for middle-school recess," Sept. 23). I am the parent of a current Roland Park Elementary 5th grader and also the parent of a recent middle school graduate. My son is now one of only 18 freshman accepted to the theater program at Baltimore School for the Arts. He was also accepted to the highly challenging and competitive "Ingenuity Program" offered at Poly.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 25, 1999
Asian women who work in ``America's worst sweatshop'' are suing such big-name clothing makers as Tommy Hilfiger, The Gap, The Limited, J. Crew and Wal-Mart, a lawyer for about 50,000 garment makers announced last month.The class-action suits accuse 18 U.S. manufacturers of selling garments made by workers who are mistreated by foreign subcontractors in the Pacific island of Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth. The lawsuits are the first to try to use U.S. racketeering laws to hold retailers accountable for worker conditions and seek about $1 billion in damages.
NEWS
March 8, 2011
So KIPP is "in limbo," eh? ( "KIPP in limbo," March 6.) Good. That's the first step toward purging our public education system of their militaristic sweatshop mentality. When they leave — and I pray they leave — the talented people who teach and serve in our public schools can have one less distraction. This gang of pedagogical frauds and con men have really pulled the wool over a lot of folk's eyes, but I've seen their kind come and go for 40 years, and they have nothing going for them except their slick-talking flacks.
NEWS
By K. Connie Kang and K. Connie Kang,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Seven years after 71 Thai workers were freed from virtual slavery in a Southern California sweatshop, they have permission to live permanently in the United States. The workers, who were allowed after trial proceedings to remain on special visas provided to witnesses whose testimony could endanger their lives, were recently notified by the Immigration and Naturalization Service of their new legal status. "I am happy, happy, happy," Sirilac Rongsakare said outside a South Los Angeles garment factory where she now works.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 13, 2003
Nike Inc., the world's largest maker of athletic shoes, agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle a California consumer's lawsuit that tested the limits of corporate free speech. The settlement resolves claims that Nike lied in a public relations campaign responding to allegations that its shoes were made in overseas sweatshops. In his suit, Mark Kasky contended the campaign violated a California truth-in-advertising law, while Nike argued that its public statements were constitutionally protected.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
Nike Inc., once a principal target of activists protesting the use of sweatshop labor, has been pardoned by investment firms that screen companies for their social and environmental records. The Bethesda-based Calvert Group mutual fund company announced yesterday that Nike now meets its standards for being a good corporate citizen. KLD Research & Analytics Inc., a Boston firm that provides research to institutional investors, also determined earlier this summer that Nike has become an acceptable investment for the socially conscious.
NEWS
March 8, 2011
So KIPP is "in limbo," eh? ( "KIPP in limbo," March 6.) Good. That's the first step toward purging our public education system of their militaristic sweatshop mentality. When they leave — and I pray they leave — the talented people who teach and serve in our public schools can have one less distraction. This gang of pedagogical frauds and con men have really pulled the wool over a lot of folk's eyes, but I've seen their kind come and go for 40 years, and they have nothing going for them except their slick-talking flacks.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | December 13, 1995
THE THING about polls is that you almost always know how they're going to turn out.You ask, for instance, whether people would buy clothes from retailers who sold garments made in sweatshops. What do you think?Right. In a recent poll, 78 percent said they wouldn't.And 84 percent said that they'd pay a buck more for a $20 clothing item if they knew it wasn't made in a sweatshop.These are easy answers. Because, how do you know? None of the clothing I've seen is labeled "made with pride at your local sweatshop with slave labor."
NEWS
By Marla Dickerson and Marla Dickerson,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- It was a story of hope: a Central American sweatshop transformed into a unionized, worker-run apparel factory thanks to nearly $600,000 in loans and donations, including help from retailers Gap and Land's End, and the AFL-CIO. Boosters traveled to U.S. college campuses and church basements, promoting the Just Garments plant in El Salvador as a company looking to do well by doing right by employees. Impoverished Salvadorans saw a chance to earn better wages and to have a say in their future.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
The state of Maryland has contracts with at least four public employee uniform companies that allegedly use sweatshop labor to turn out inexpensive shirts, jackets and pants, according to a report by SweatFree Communities, a group that wants to create a consortium of federal, state and local governments that oppose such labor practices. In the first report of its kind, SweatFree Communities reached out to workers in factories in China, Bangladesh, Honduras and several other nations to gauge working conditions.
NEWS
By Marla Dickerson and Marla Dickerson,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- It was a story of hope: a Central American sweatshop transformed into a unionized, worker-run apparel factory thanks to nearly $600,000 in loans and donations, including help from retailers Gap and Land's End, and the AFL-CIO. Boosters traveled to U.S. college campuses and church basements, promoting the Just Garments plant in El Salvador as a company looking to do well by doing right by employees. Impoverished Salvadorans saw a chance to earn better wages and to have a say in their future.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
Nike Inc., once a principal target of activists protesting the use of sweatshop labor, has been pardoned by investment firms that screen companies for their social and environmental records. The Bethesda-based Calvert Group mutual fund company announced yesterday that Nike now meets its standards for being a good corporate citizen. KLD Research & Analytics Inc., a Boston firm that provides research to institutional investors, also determined earlier this summer that Nike has become an acceptable investment for the socially conscious.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 13, 2003
Nike Inc., the world's largest maker of athletic shoes, agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle a California consumer's lawsuit that tested the limits of corporate free speech. The settlement resolves claims that Nike lied in a public relations campaign responding to allegations that its shoes were made in overseas sweatshops. In his suit, Mark Kasky contended the campaign violated a California truth-in-advertising law, while Nike argued that its public statements were constitutionally protected.
NEWS
By K. Connie Kang and K. Connie Kang,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Seven years after 71 Thai workers were freed from virtual slavery in a Southern California sweatshop, they have permission to live permanently in the United States. The workers, who were allowed after trial proceedings to remain on special visas provided to witnesses whose testimony could endanger their lives, were recently notified by the Immigration and Naturalization Service of their new legal status. "I am happy, happy, happy," Sirilac Rongsakare said outside a South Los Angeles garment factory where she now works.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 2000
An arm of the Pentagon has come under fire for procuring large quantities of apparel from a Nicaraguan factory that labor rights groups say is a sweatshop and about which the U.S. trade representative has voiced serious concerns. Several members of Congress say it is wrong for the Pentagon agency, which runs 1,400 stores at military bases and made $7.3 billion in sales last year, to obtain apparel from the Chentex factory, which a Nicaraguan union has accused of firing more than 150 union supporters.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 19, 1996
BOSTON -- This story begins with a pair of tennis shorts. Generic white. Cotton knit. Deep pockets. No teeny-weeny polo players or alligators or famous players' endorsements.On the outside they bear a price tag: $24.95. On the inside they have a label boasting their and my country of origin: the USA. They have another label recording their and my size: Never mind. And of course, a third label telling how to clean them: Wash in cold water, tumble-dry low.I have come here to adopt these tennis shorts as my very own. So I add them to a pile already containing two pairs of socks born in China.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
I feel compelled to address the issues discussed in Erica Green 's recent article specific to Roland Park Elementary/Middle School ("Roland Park parents push for middle-school recess," Sept. 23). I am the parent of a current Roland Park Elementary 5th grader and also the parent of a recent middle school graduate. My son is now one of only 18 freshman accepted to the theater program at Baltimore School for the Arts. He was also accepted to the highly challenging and competitive "Ingenuity Program" offered at Poly.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 24, 1999
ABU EL ASJA, West Bank -- A fire that killled 16 young factory workers in the West Bank city of Hebron last week has opened a window on a disturbing side of the struggling Palestinian economy: a large number of small, unregulated sweatshops throughout the West Bank and Gaza.In sprawling Hebron alone, there are about 2,000 factories, less than one-fourth of them licensed, turning out everything from shoes to shampoo, says Jamal Shobaky, a local member of the Palestinian Legislative Council.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 25, 1999
Asian women who work in ``America's worst sweatshop'' are suing such big-name clothing makers as Tommy Hilfiger, The Gap, The Limited, J. Crew and Wal-Mart, a lawyer for about 50,000 garment makers announced last month.The class-action suits accuse 18 U.S. manufacturers of selling garments made by workers who are mistreated by foreign subcontractors in the Pacific island of Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth. The lawsuits are the first to try to use U.S. racketeering laws to hold retailers accountable for worker conditions and seek about $1 billion in damages.
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