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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to the Sun | August 9, 2007
Everyone knows what it's like to perspire -- particularly during the sultry dog days of summer. But some people sweat so profusely -- from their hands, feet, armpits or genital areas -- that it can radically affect their lives, says Dr. Mark J. Krasna, a thoracic surgeon and medical director of the Cancer Institute at St. Joseph Medical Center. They may be suffering from a condition known as hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating. What if, Krasna asks, you weren't able to shake hands at a job interview?
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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
It's a sweaty kind of summer. And while the multiple days of triple-digit temperatures have made some people glow and others drip, everyone seems to be seeking ways to dry off. Some are showering more or slathering on "clinical-strength" antiperspirant. Others, some vain and some desperate, are seeking Botox injections to block the nerves stimulating sweat glands. And those living with extreme conditions are even undergoing surgery to stop sweating permanently. "Everyone sweats," said Dr. David M. Pariser, past president of the American Academy of Dermatology.
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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | December 19, 1999
Q. I received an e-mail message that has scared me. It said antiperspirants are the leading cause of breast cancer. Is this true? I cannot imagine giving up my antiperspirant, but I don't want to do anything that would cause a buildup of toxins and put me at risk of breast cancer. A. Epidemiologists have found a number of risk factors for breast cancer, but antiperspirant use does not appear to be among them. Breast cancer is associated with being female, getting older, having a family history of the disease and taking estrogen for more than five years.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to the Sun | August 9, 2007
Everyone knows what it's like to perspire -- particularly during the sultry dog days of summer. But some people sweat so profusely -- from their hands, feet, armpits or genital areas -- that it can radically affect their lives, says Dr. Mark J. Krasna, a thoracic surgeon and medical director of the Cancer Institute at St. Joseph Medical Center. They may be suffering from a condition known as hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating. What if, Krasna asks, you weren't able to shake hands at a job interview?
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
It's a sweaty kind of summer. And while the multiple days of triple-digit temperatures have made some people glow and others drip, everyone seems to be seeking ways to dry off. Some are showering more or slathering on "clinical-strength" antiperspirant. Others, some vain and some desperate, are seeking Botox injections to block the nerves stimulating sweat glands. And those living with extreme conditions are even undergoing surgery to stop sweating permanently. "Everyone sweats," said Dr. David M. Pariser, past president of the American Academy of Dermatology.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
What can you do about smelly feet and armpits? Lots, including washing a lot and keeping these areas as dry and cool as possible. As you may have noticed, sweat, which helps regulate body temperature, smells different in different parts of the body. That's because the skin contains different kinds of glands. The more common are the eccrine glands, which pump out salty water (sweat). Sweaty feet smell bad because of bacteria that feed off this sweat and dead skin, said Dr. Robert Stern, chief of dermatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
NEWS
March 21, 2001
Do you know? Do rock hyrax live in families or alone? Answer: Rock hyrax live in large family groups that often huddle together to keep warm. Learn more! Visit the rock hyrax at the Baltimore Zoo. 1. Rock hyrax have rubbery pads containing sweat glands on the bottom of their feet. 2. When running, the glands on the feet sweat, which helps the rock hyrax climb.
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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | June 22, 1993
When you exercise, your body temperature rises because more than 70 percent of the energy that is used to drive your muscles is lost as heat. If your temperature rises too high, you can suffer from heat stroke and pass out.Spring and early summer are the most common times for heat stroke to occur because your body loses some of its ability to dissipate heat during the winter.In colder weather, your body has little trouble dissipating the extra heat. When warm weather arrives, it takes from four to 14 days of exercising in the heat to protect you fromhaving your temperature rise too high.
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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
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June 19, 1998
How many flowers is 1 daisy:A-1B-Excuse me?C-256D-HundredsE-Daisies are not really flowers.Answer: Daisies are a kind of chrysanthemum and havcombination blossoms - hundreds of eensy-beensy flowers crammed together as one big flower. Each tiny flower makes 1 seed.How does......a kite fly?- Ing HianRepublicof SingaporeA painful beauty about kites is that without the string, thecouldn't fly. Kites fly because air pressure on your side of the kite is higher than on the back side. If you let go of the string, the kit twists sideways and the air pressures equalize, making the kite fall.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
What can you do about smelly feet and armpits? Lots, including washing a lot and keeping these areas as dry and cool as possible. As you may have noticed, sweat, which helps regulate body temperature, smells different in different parts of the body. That's because the skin contains different kinds of glands. The more common are the eccrine glands, which pump out salty water (sweat). Sweaty feet smell bad because of bacteria that feed off this sweat and dead skin, said Dr. Robert Stern, chief of dermatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | December 19, 1999
Q. I received an e-mail message that has scared me. It said antiperspirants are the leading cause of breast cancer. Is this true? I cannot imagine giving up my antiperspirant, but I don't want to do anything that would cause a buildup of toxins and put me at risk of breast cancer. A. Epidemiologists have found a number of risk factors for breast cancer, but antiperspirant use does not appear to be among them. Breast cancer is associated with being female, getting older, having a family history of the disease and taking estrogen for more than five years.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Kevin Van Valkenburg | August 19, 2008
The Sun's Olympic correspondents, Rick Maese and Kevin Van Valkenburg, are blogging to each other at baltimoresun.com/olympicsblog . An excerpt: To: Kevin, et al. Subject: Melted? This morning brought about a stunning realization. We woke up way too early - as is the norm here - and went downstairs to catch a shuttle, as we had every other morning. But then, nothing. There would be no visit to the Water Cube, our home and work station for nine straight days. While we knew this moment was coming, it was still a bit of a shock to realize that swimming was over and - gasp!
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By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | August 17, 1993
When you exercise in hot weather, you sweat and lose a lot of salt. That doesn't mean that you need to take salt tablets. The use of salt tablets is recommended only if their benefits exceed their side effects.If you lose more salt than you take in, your muscles will start to hurt and cramp. You will feel tired and sick and develop a headache. You can even pass out. Taking salt tablets would replace the lost salt; however, they have side effects. They can irritate your stomach lining and make you throw up, and they can thicken your blood enough to cause clots in your arteries.
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