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Sweat Equity

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By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 1997
A GROUP of young people from Holy Trinity Catholic Church made a difference in the lives of a Baltimore family by helping renovate a home in the city's Sandtown community.Members of Holy Trinity's senior high ministry worked on the house in June and again Saturday with volunteers from Habitat for Humanity.Chris Benney of Glen Burnie called the work "an awesome experience to go out and help other people who are less fortunate.""It's a great feeling," said Chris, who was one of 26 students who helped on the project.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Wings stood off to one side. The propeller lay in a carton. But the main part of Carl Kesselring's pet project was clearly recognizable as an airplane in progress. "I don't have fear of getting in an airplane," he said, standing in a hangar in Suburban Airport in Laurel surrounded by tools, parts and the remains of a bird's nest that fell through a hole in the roof. "I have confidence in my ability to make it work properly. " Kesselring's daring hobby is increasingly shared by other enthusiasts as the number of amateur-built airplanes grows every year, according to the Experimental Aircraft Association.
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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
With hammer in hand, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman plans to visit a Taneytown subdivision today to learn about a self-help housing project the agency finances.Glickman plans to spend about an hour working with 16 families who are helping to build their homes in the Freestate Heights subdivision off Maryland Avenue. The families have incomes too low to qualify for conventional mortgages, so they are investing "sweat equity," doing much of the work themselves to reduce the cost.Glickman will use the project as a setting to talk about the importance of affordable housing for low-income families in rural areas.
NEWS
August 21, 2009
With the right team and the right project, a renovated Parkway theater could become the much-needed centerpiece of the fledgling arts district north of Penn Station. The strip along North Charles Street between Mount Royal and North avenues has long been a lively destination for movie- and theatergoers. But after the area became the first in the city to receive state designation as an arts and entertainment district in 2001, it took off as a magnet for young artists, musicians and other creative types.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1997
Union Bridge might be the next Carroll County community in line for a nonprofit program that helps low- and moderate-income people work their way to homeownership.James E. Upchurch Jr., president of Interfaith Housing of Western Maryland Inc., said his organization is evaluating the feasibility of such a project in Union Bridge. Representatives held three community meetings during the summer."I'm encouraged. I'm mostly encouraged by the fact that we have leadership and vision on the part of the local officials and the people who came out to the meetings really cared about the community and wanted to see it upgraded," he said.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
For the first six families in a Taneytown self-help housing project, the journey to homeownership began in a clutter of concrete blocks, beams, floor joists and masonry nails.It wasn't your usual builders' crew that showed up for work at 8 a.m. on a Saturday this month, schlepping through mud that surrounded the foundations of two houses under construction in Freestate Heights, north of Commerce Street. It was a group of men, women and a few children who made up in determination and enthusiasm what they lacked in construction experience.
BUSINESS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | June 13, 1991
Ever since she was a little girl, Barbara Ellison has dreamed of someday owning her own home. Now, after years of waiting and more than 2,000 hours of work toward her goal, Ellison, 37, is seeing her dream become a reality.In about a week, Ellison and her two sons will move from their apartment on Garrison Boulevard to the 2800 block of W. North Ave., where they will take up residence in a three-story, two-bedroom row house she has acquired through a homesteading program.For about two years, Ellison hammered, plastered walls and cleaned up trash in an effort to make the rundown house her Sandtown home.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
Clydelle Griffin, who acquired a Baltimore house from Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity yesterday, said her younger days spent picking cotton under the South Carolina sun as a sharecropper's daughter prepared her for the hard work needed to earn the required 300 hours of "sweat equity." A smiling Griffin, 52, stood on the porch of her solidly built four-bedroom house yesterday and thanked a gathering of family, friends and advocates of affordable housing. Some said the house in the 3500 block of Greenmount Ave., which was built in the early 20th century, was a small miracle in renovation.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
It's not every day under the sun you see a first lady with a hammer and nail in her hands, putting in "sweat equity" on a house construction site with a score of fellow women workers. But that was the scene yesterday on Hilltop Lane in Annapolis, where Frances Hughes Glendening came to work on a Habitat for Humanity project, a bright white town house for a 35-year-old widow and her two daughters. "She was so down to earth, it seemed like you knew her forever," said District Court clerk Janice Tutt, as she and others nailed vinyl siding to the front of what will be Tutt's home come September.
NEWS
September 18, 1990
County Executive O. James Lighthizer has invited all community associations in Anne Arundel County to apply for funding for improvements through the Community Beautification and Environmental Grant Programs.The grants will pay up to $2,000 per community organization for landscaping, beautifying and addressing environmental concerns in common areas of the community.The money comes from a $125,000 Beautification Grant Program, and a $100,000 Environmental Grant Program fund, and organizations throughout the county already have used the county funding to landscape and beautify their neighborhoods, create wildlife habitats, and halt shoreline erosion.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
With a tool belt slung on her hips, Dana Gaither crouched on a deck on a recent Wednesday, squinting at the bottom edge of a piece of composite siding. Palms on the piece, she lapped it over the top of a big plank of siding. She aligned the lower edge with a red line on the plank. "I think that's it," she shouted over a symphony from a nearby generator, hammers, saws and drills. Volunteer Carol Suzdak pounded in one nail. Next, Gaither hammered in the other. Then, each holding an end of a level, they made sure the siding was on straight.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
IT'S GREAT that Baltimore's Believe in Our Schools campaign is expected to save the school system from $5 million to $10 million in physical improvements to buildings and grounds citywide. The greater result, though, is the sign of a return to the days when more people and businesses took an interest in their neighborhood schools, and a clear signal to city kids that folks outside their immediate crowd care about them and want them to succeed. In the eight weekends since the school work began, more than 2,500 volunteers have improved some 100 schools, building from a June 26 start with work at three schools to some two dozen school projects a week in July.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2003
After growing up in the housing projects of Nyack, N.Y., Cynthia Payne and her teen-age daughter, Brittney, have found a home of their own in Pen Lucy. "I'll have something to pass on to Brittney," the 31-year-old Payne said of her brick rowhouse. "A piece of the American dream." Payne is slated to be the first to move into a cluster of rowhouses that Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity plans to rehabilitate in Pen Lucy, a North Baltimore neighborhood just east of York Road. The rowhouses and duplexes on Cator Avenue have clearly seen better days - and, if the program works, may see better days again.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
Clydelle Griffin, who acquired a Baltimore house from Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity yesterday, said her younger days spent picking cotton under the South Carolina sun as a sharecropper's daughter prepared her for the hard work needed to earn the required 300 hours of "sweat equity." A smiling Griffin, 52, stood on the porch of her solidly built four-bedroom house yesterday and thanked a gathering of family, friends and advocates of affordable housing. Some said the house in the 3500 block of Greenmount Ave., which was built in the early 20th century, was a small miracle in renovation.
FEATURES
By Donna Owens and Donna Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2000
It is late, nearly midnight, and actress Nicole Ari Parker has just finished another 14-hour day on location in Toronto, shooting scenes for the coming Showtime series, "Soul Food." As the Baltimore native begins a telephone chat, she is bursting with energy and emphatic declarations. But after a while, fatigue starts to seep ever so softly into her voice. Marathon workdays, rehearsals, magazine shoots, promotional events, quick meals and very little sleep have left Parker understandably exhausted - but grateful.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
It's not every day under the sun you see a first lady with a hammer and nail in her hands, putting in "sweat equity" on a house construction site with a score of fellow women workers. But that was the scene yesterday on Hilltop Lane in Annapolis, where Frances Hughes Glendening came to work on a Habitat for Humanity project, a bright white town house for a 35-year-old widow and her two daughters. "She was so down to earth, it seemed like you knew her forever," said District Court clerk Janice Tutt, as she and others nailed vinyl siding to the front of what will be Tutt's home come September.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
With a tool belt slung on her hips, Dana Gaither crouched on a deck on a recent Wednesday, squinting at the bottom edge of a piece of composite siding. Palms on the piece, she lapped it over the top of a big plank of siding. She aligned the lower edge with a red line on the plank. "I think that's it," she shouted over a symphony from a nearby generator, hammers, saws and drills. Volunteer Carol Suzdak pounded in one nail. Next, Gaither hammered in the other. Then, each holding an end of a level, they made sure the siding was on straight.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
It's not every day under the sun you see a first lady with a hammer and nail in her hands, putting in "sweat equity" on a house construction site with a score of fellow women workers. But that was the scene yesterday on Hilltop Lane in Annapolis, where Frances Hughes Glendening came to work on a Habitat for Humanity project, a bright white town house for a 35-year-old widow and her two daughters. "She was so down to earth, it seemed like you knew her forever," said District Court clerk Janice Tutt, as she and others nailed vinyl siding to the front of what will be Tutt's home come September.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | March 5, 2000
A COLLEAGUE of Karols, new to town and dwelling in the suburbs, is pondering a move to the city. He and his wife love the rowhouses, the ambience, the neighborhood quality of places such as Federal Hill, Fells Point, and, in its new surge of development, Canton. Ron has also seen rising interest in the Bolton Hill-Reservoir Hill areas, and in the area around the two stadiums downtown. But this couple has already looked at some houses and discovered they are 30 years too late for the kind of real estate killing made by people in the 70s, who bought crumbling, Formstone-coated rowhouses and turned them into period palaces.
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