Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSwayze
IN THE NEWS

Swayze

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 16, 1995
John Cameron Swayze, one of television's first evening news anchors and the man who introduced the sentence "It takes a licking and keeps on ticking" into popular culture as the voice of Timex watches, died yesterday at his home in Sarasota, Fla. He was 89.Mr. Swayze, whose crisp but folksy voice made him one of the first television personalities, started his career as a journalist, first as a newspaper reporter, then a radio broadcaster. He switched to television in 1949 as the host of the "Camel News Caravan" on NBC.After his news show ended in 1956, Mr. Swayze became the pitchman for Timex watches.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | March 19, 2009
'Road House' 8 p.m. [AMC] It's counterprogramming for the NCAA tournament. This is only one of the greatest bad movies of all time, featuring Patrick Swayze (left) as a traveling bouncer kicking bad-guy butt and winning hot-chick heart. Not to mention dispensing life lessons: "Pain don't hurt" and "Be nice until it's time to not be nice."
Advertisement
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 15, 2009
The Beast is a new drama series starring Patrick Swayze as a maverick FBI veteran who gets teamed with a rookie (Travis Fimmel). But with that rather conventional premise, can it ever be a beast in the ratings? It's pretty much impossible to describe The Beast - which debuts tonight - without getting tangled in the underbrush of potboiler cliche. Hard, unorthodox veteran who breaches the bureau's code of ethics to get the job done. Clear-eyed kid who worships the grizzled vet. And so on. But do you honestly think anyone will pan Swayze's performance - especially after the five-hankie interview with Barbara Walters about his battle with pancreatic cancer?
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 15, 2009
The Beast is a new drama series starring Patrick Swayze as a maverick FBI veteran who gets teamed with a rookie (Travis Fimmel). But with that rather conventional premise, can it ever be a beast in the ratings? It's pretty much impossible to describe The Beast - which debuts tonight - without getting tangled in the underbrush of potboiler cliche. Hard, unorthodox veteran who breaches the bureau's code of ethics to get the job done. Clear-eyed kid who worships the grizzled vet. And so on. But do you honestly think anyone will pan Swayze's performance - especially after the five-hankie interview with Barbara Walters about his battle with pancreatic cancer?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 28, 1995
"I could be quite happy screwing up my career," says Patrick Swayze.Possibly, he means it. His last two films have been about as far from the macho action dude of "Roadhouse" and "Point Break" as it was possible to get, and even further from the sensitive romantics he played in "Ghost" and "Dirty Dancing."In "To Wong Fu, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar," he spends the whole picture in drag behind a face-full of Carol Channing's makeup, and in the yet more peculiar "Three Wishes," which opened yesterday, he plays a drifting hippie-philosopher stuck in the grimly conformist year of 1955.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | March 19, 2009
'Road House' 8 p.m. [AMC] It's counterprogramming for the NCAA tournament. This is only one of the greatest bad movies of all time, featuring Patrick Swayze (left) as a traveling bouncer kicking bad-guy butt and winning hot-chick heart. Not to mention dispensing life lessons: "Pain don't hurt" and "Be nice until it's time to not be nice."
FEATURES
May 4, 2007
Dirty Dancing opened in select movie theaters to mark the 20th anniversary of the film starring Patrick Swayze. In your opinion, what made Dirty Dancing a film worth seeing again? WHAT YOU SAY I thought Dirty Dancing was one of the most delightful movies I have ever seen. In fact, I have been able to view many reruns throughout the years. The story line was pure and simple; the cast of dancers was superb, exhibiting the various Latin dances. The late Jerry Orbach was excellent as the ever-doting but overwatchful parent of teenage daughters, and Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey outdid themselves in displaying their talents.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 27, 1995
A few really interesting ideas bubble through "Three Wishes," so it's a pity the film itself isn't more interesting.Its best thing is a quietly revisionist re-creation of 1955 that shows not merely the sentimental vision of a happy, well-ordered world but almost subversively suggests the oppressive climate of conformism that made sure that world was so well-ordered.Director Martha Coolidge stresses primary colors, prim little houses with neat yards, men in bermudas and dark socks, family cookouts and a male society so impervious to its female partners as anything but extensions of their own egos as to be almost comical.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
"City of Joy" has a slightly archaic feeling to it, as if it were based on a novel by Somerset Maugham rather than Dominique Lapierre. It's about a disillusioned young doctor finding himself in the human flotsam and jetsam of the Third World -- in th"City of Joy" has a slightly archaic feeling to it, as if it were based on a novel by Somerset Maugham rather than Dominique Lapierre. It's about a disillusioned young doctor finding himself in the human flotsam and jetsam of the Third World -- in this case the vast slum in Calcutta, India, whose ironic moniker titles the film.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
"The City of Joy" has a slightly archaic feeling to it, as if it were based on a novel by Somerset Maugham rather than Dominique Lapierre. It's about a disillusioned young doctor finding himself in the human flotsam and jetsam of the Third World -- in this case the vast slum in Calcutta, India, whose ironic moniker titles the film. I kept waiting for Bette Davis to make an appearance as the fallen woman.But like many movies about Occidentals being awakened morally and spiritually in different cultures -- ("Dances With Wolves" springs instantly to mind, followed immediately by "The Year of Living Dangerously")
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 10, 2009
U2's Bono to write column for The New York Times Bono - lead singer for U2 and an advocate in the fight against poverty in Africa and AIDS - will write an Op-Ed column for The New York Times. The paper announced that his first column will appear tomorrow, for which he will also do a podcast. His column will appear occasionally. Bono, 48, called the gig "an honor," and joked that he's "never been great with the full stops or commas." The Times said the column will cover a broad range of topics.
FEATURES
May 4, 2007
Dirty Dancing opened in select movie theaters to mark the 20th anniversary of the film starring Patrick Swayze. In your opinion, what made Dirty Dancing a film worth seeing again? WHAT YOU SAY I thought Dirty Dancing was one of the most delightful movies I have ever seen. In fact, I have been able to view many reruns throughout the years. The story line was pure and simple; the cast of dancers was superb, exhibiting the various Latin dances. The late Jerry Orbach was excellent as the ever-doting but overwatchful parent of teenage daughters, and Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey outdid themselves in displaying their talents.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
U.S. forces captured Saddam Hussein Saturday night as part of an operation code-named Red Dawn. The reference, we understand, is to a 1984 film starring Patrick Swayze about a group of teen-agers who almost single-handedly thwart a Soviet invasion of the United States. Interesting factoid, sure. But assuredly, there's something more to this. The similarities between the movie and the mission are just too eerie to be dismissed as coincidence. Consider: Red Dawn featured key figures -- a couple of girls, including terminally cute actress Lea Thompson -- found cowering in a covered pit, hiding from a fate (invading Soviets)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 18, 2003
Jake Gyllenhaal, who looks like Tobey Maguire's loonier brother, has run through a spate of oddball roles, such as the title character in Bubble Boy and the Holden Caulfield wannabe in The Good Girl. None is weirder than the lead in Donnie Darko, a troubled suburban teen-ager visited by a demonic, human-sized rabbit named Frank. Premiering theatrically in Baltimore today at the Charles months after hitting the DVD racks, this 2001 picture has gained a wide cult following - it ranks 88 on the Internet Movie Database list of the top 250 films.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and By Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | April 15, 2001
"Taps," by Willie Morris. Houghton Mifflin. 340 pages. $26. When Willie Morris died in August 1999, his friends, a group that apparently includes every literary light in North America, gathered to celebrate his rich life and to mourn the passing of an original voice. This book, published posthumously, will elicit those same emotions. The delight evoked by Morris' graceful and eloquent passages is muted by the sorrow of knowing that this is the last work of an author who gave us "North Toward Home" and "My Dog Skip."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 28, 1995
"I could be quite happy screwing up my career," says Patrick Swayze.Possibly, he means it. His last two films have been about as far from the macho action dude of "Roadhouse" and "Point Break" as it was possible to get, and even further from the sensitive romantics he played in "Ghost" and "Dirty Dancing."In "To Wong Fu, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar," he spends the whole picture in drag behind a face-full of Carol Channing's makeup, and in the yet more peculiar "Three Wishes," which opened yesterday, he plays a drifting hippie-philosopher stuck in the grimly conformist year of 1955.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 18, 1992
THEATERBreathtaking experienceWhen "Les Miserables" came to the Mechanic Theatre two years ago, it looked and sounded better than any show ever had there. Now this musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's 19th century epic novel has returned, and although a few of the performances don't shine as brightly, the overall effect is as breathtaking as ever. Weekend show times are today at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and tomorrow at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets are scarce, but a few are still available. Prices are $43.50-$48.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | December 3, 2008
Swayze says he's doing just fine in cancer fight Patrick Swayze is angry about tabloid reports that say he doesn't have long to live. The actor, who was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year, issued a statement yesterday affirming that so far he is winning his fight against the disease and responding well to treatment. Swayze said of the publications: "They're reporting that I'm on my last legs and saying goodbye to my tearful family! ... It's upsetting that the shoddy and reckless reporting from these publications cast a negative shadow on the positive and good fight I'm fighting."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 27, 1995
A few really interesting ideas bubble through "Three Wishes," so it's a pity the film itself isn't more interesting.Its best thing is a quietly revisionist re-creation of 1955 that shows not merely the sentimental vision of a happy, well-ordered world but almost subversively suggests the oppressive climate of conformism that made sure that world was so well-ordered.Director Martha Coolidge stresses primary colors, prim little houses with neat yards, men in bermudas and dark socks, family cookouts and a male society so impervious to its female partners as anything but extensions of their own egos as to be almost comical.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.