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By Robin Updike and Robin Updike,Seattle Times | February 26, 1992
If you didn't buy Microsoft stock when it went public for peanuts in 1986, here's another missed investment possibility that will make your day: That same year you could have plunked down $50 for a Swatch wristwatch designed by pop artist Keith Haring that might be worth as much as $5,555 today.Yes, we're talking about one of those plastic, techni-colored watches with plastic bands and hands instead of digital readouts. Their looks change each season according to the fashion whims of the Milan, Italy, design team and guest artists who design them, making Swatch the watch industry's equivalent of trendy T-shirts or costume jewelry.
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By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Heads turned as John Robinson drives his diminutive Smart car along U.S. 1. Is it a shrunken minivan? An oversized Hot Wheels? The University of Maryland professor pulls up alongside a sport utility vehicle, and lengthwise, the Smart was about a third of its size. A construction worker gazes so intently he almost walks into a moving crane. Another driver whips out his cell phone camera to shoot the tiny vehicle. Robinson smiles. He seems to enjoy the attention generated by his car - which at just over 8 feet long is 4 feet shorter than a Mini Cooper - so much so he no longer bemoans that it took seven years to secure one to use in this country.
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By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
Got a sec?Michelangelo Capraro doesn't-- not anymore. These days the 24-year-old Web designer from Santa Monica, Calif., is living on Internet time.On a typical workday he rises at 700 beats. By 750 beats, he's in the office checking e-mail. At 900 beats, he faxes a lunch order to the Italian deli around the corner, which, he says, takes about half an hour to prepare. "Oops, I mean 20 beats," he corrects himself. At 170 beats, he logs off his PC and heads home.The "beats" that govern Capraro's life are the brainchild of Swatch, the cheeky Swiss watchmaker that is to the staid business of horology what Dennis Rodman is to basketball.
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By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2006
For years, we relegated gardens to the back yard or to discretely planted aprons around the house. But lately, gardeners -- hungry for beauty and eager to embellish any bit of earth available -- have begun to create curbside gardens. "People want to see some color when they pull in," says Kelly Williams, manager of Kingsdene Nurseries and Garden Center in Monkton. Many also want to make a personal statement. "They want their house to stand out," Williams added. Curbside gardens can enhance the strip between curb and sidewalk, the napkin of ground around the mailbox, or even the dirt around street trees, which can host a gorgeous collection of tough shade-lovers like hosta and coral bells (Heuchera)
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives/. * The Swatch watch first appeared in what year? * The Philco Holiday television cost how much in 1958? * What is the moral of Aesop's"The Lion and the Mouse"? WATCH OUT! Have you ever wondered what makes your watch actually go? You'll find your answer at The Quartz Watch Web site. Tinkered with by inventors for the past 100 years, quartz finally emerged in consumer products during the 1960s, and today, we're lucky enough to enjoy its time-keeping benefits.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
Lab coats have their place, but not in the dining rooms of Oak Crest Village. Doris Henning, the Parkville retirement community's director of dining services, favors appetizing apparel that runs to jewel tones and natural fabrics. At the same time, says Henning, 42, it's important to wear clothes that "are easy to maintain," keeping in mind the potential for spills.How do you approach shopping?I don't shop per se for outfits so much as I do a lot of separates. I buy something because I like it rather than because it goes with something.
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By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | July 21, 1996
Team Dead HeadThe slam-dunking skeleton of the '92 Olympics is alive and kicking. T-shirts, based on those originally worn by the Lithuanian Olympic Basketball Team and produced with funds donated by the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia, have met with such success that old and new versions of the shirts are circulating.Greg Speirs, the artist who designed the original, wears the commemorative skull-man line, which he markets through Slow Leak Apparel at $30; (800) 550-6531.Not Fade Away has a model at $28; (800)
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | November 21, 1999
Fair-haired fascinationDo blondes have more fun?Of course, says a new book by Barnaby Conrad III called "The Blonde" (Chronicle Books, $29.95). The book celebrates the myth and magic of blondes in entertainment, literature, politics and pop culture in the decades between World War I and Vietnam, from the rise of Jean Harlow to the demise of Marilyn Monroe."
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
Nicole Arrington moved from New York City to Baltimore three years ago, but still pines for her hometown's profusion of discount boutiques and storefronts where you can snatch up a DKNY sweater or top for a fraction of its original cost.Needless to say, Arrington, who works at the Swatch Store in the Gallery at Harborplace, has illuminated Charm City with unique, urban flair, nurtured in the city that never sleeps.For its part, the Baltimore Swatch Store celebrates seasonal spirit on Dec. 20 by inviting the public to bring in a new or nearly new toy for charity in exchange for a free gift from Swatch.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Heads turned as John Robinson drives his diminutive Smart car along U.S. 1. Is it a shrunken minivan? An oversized Hot Wheels? The University of Maryland professor pulls up alongside a sport utility vehicle, and lengthwise, the Smart was about a third of its size. A construction worker gazes so intently he almost walks into a moving crane. Another driver whips out his cell phone camera to shoot the tiny vehicle. Robinson smiles. He seems to enjoy the attention generated by his car - which at just over 8 feet long is 4 feet shorter than a Mini Cooper - so much so he no longer bemoans that it took seven years to secure one to use in this country.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | January 7, 2006
Picking that "just-right" interior paint color used to be difficult. You would bring back tiny color swatches -- called paint chips -- from the hardware or paint store, hold them up to a huge wall, then try to envision an accurate depth of blue or a specific paleness of yellow as they might spread across a larger area. Today, paint chips are old hat. With the trend toward bolder interior colors, major manufacturers are offering paint samples that actually are applied to walls. These samples -- liquids are sold in 2-ounce containers and peel-and-stick reusable swatches come in coordinated palettes -- provide a truer indication of how the color will blend with accessories, furniture and light.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
After more than a year of nail-biting negotiations, Archbishop Spalding High School has an agreement to purchase the adjacent 22-acre farm from three elderly Severn brothers who were determined the property wouldn't become another housing development. The Upton family farm, which will cost the school about $2 million, is one of the few remaining working farms along busy New Cut Road. Spalding plans to convert the land where fruit and tobacco once grew into badly needed playing fields for its lacrosse, soccer and softball teams.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives/. * The Swatch watch first appeared in what year? * The Philco Holiday television cost how much in 1958? * What is the moral of Aesop's"The Lion and the Mouse"? WATCH OUT! Have you ever wondered what makes your watch actually go? You'll find your answer at The Quartz Watch Web site. Tinkered with by inventors for the past 100 years, quartz finally emerged in consumer products during the 1960s, and today, we're lucky enough to enjoy its time-keeping benefits.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | November 21, 1999
Fair-haired fascinationDo blondes have more fun?Of course, says a new book by Barnaby Conrad III called "The Blonde" (Chronicle Books, $29.95). The book celebrates the myth and magic of blondes in entertainment, literature, politics and pop culture in the decades between World War I and Vietnam, from the rise of Jean Harlow to the demise of Marilyn Monroe."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
Got a sec?Michelangelo Capraro doesn't-- not anymore. These days the 24-year-old Web designer from Santa Monica, Calif., is living on Internet time.On a typical workday he rises at 700 beats. By 750 beats, he's in the office checking e-mail. At 900 beats, he faxes a lunch order to the Italian deli around the corner, which, he says, takes about half an hour to prepare. "Oops, I mean 20 beats," he corrects himself. At 170 beats, he logs off his PC and heads home.The "beats" that govern Capraro's life are the brainchild of Swatch, the cheeky Swiss watchmaker that is to the staid business of horology what Dennis Rodman is to basketball.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
Lab coats have their place, but not in the dining rooms of Oak Crest Village. Doris Henning, the Parkville retirement community's director of dining services, favors appetizing apparel that runs to jewel tones and natural fabrics. At the same time, says Henning, 42, it's important to wear clothes that "are easy to maintain," keeping in mind the potential for spills.How do you approach shopping?I don't shop per se for outfits so much as I do a lot of separates. I buy something because I like it rather than because it goes with something.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
After more than a year of nail-biting negotiations, Archbishop Spalding High School has an agreement to purchase the adjacent 22-acre farm from three elderly Severn brothers who were determined the property wouldn't become another housing development. The Upton family farm, which will cost the school about $2 million, is one of the few remaining working farms along busy New Cut Road. Spalding plans to convert the land where fruit and tobacco once grew into badly needed playing fields for its lacrosse, soccer and softball teams.
FEATURES
By Ellen Sweets and Ellen Sweets,Dallas Morning News | September 24, 1993
If you've got the money, honey, they've got the time."They" being the artists, designers and marketing people who bring you the Swatch watch, currently en route to achieving cult status among a small but growing band of devotees.How devoted are they?So devoted they pay an annual membership of $100 to belong to an international Swatch Watch Club.So devoted they stand in line for hours for the privilege of owning a particular design.So devoted they pay up to $25,000 for a hard-to-find kind.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
Nicole Arrington moved from New York City to Baltimore three years ago, but still pines for her hometown's profusion of discount boutiques and storefronts where you can snatch up a DKNY sweater or top for a fraction of its original cost.Needless to say, Arrington, who works at the Swatch Store in the Gallery at Harborplace, has illuminated Charm City with unique, urban flair, nurtured in the city that never sleeps.For its part, the Baltimore Swatch Store celebrates seasonal spirit on Dec. 20 by inviting the public to bring in a new or nearly new toy for charity in exchange for a free gift from Swatch.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | July 21, 1996
Team Dead HeadThe slam-dunking skeleton of the '92 Olympics is alive and kicking. T-shirts, based on those originally worn by the Lithuanian Olympic Basketball Team and produced with funds donated by the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia, have met with such success that old and new versions of the shirts are circulating.Greg Speirs, the artist who designed the original, wears the commemorative skull-man line, which he markets through Slow Leak Apparel at $30; (800) 550-6531.Not Fade Away has a model at $28; (800)
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