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NEWS
February 26, 2010
Once again we are hearing from Mayor Cheye Calvo of Berwyn Heights who seems to be determined to disband SWAT teams throughout Prince George's County and perhaps the entire state ("Numbers paint portrait of SWAT team use," Feb. 26). Mr. Calvo's crusade is the result of one incident in Berwyn Heights in which a SWAT team, in a mistaken drug raid, killed his dogs. If mistakes were made during the operation in Berwyn Heights, then those mistakes were no doubt identified and appropriate training and policy modifications put in place.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Law enforcement agencies across Maryland are no longer required to collect and report the race of drivers in traffic stops to the state because legislators didn't notice a 3-year-old law expiring. Police, sheriff's departments and other similar agencies also no longer have to provide the state with information about their SWAT deployments as another expiring law had stipulated. The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland decried the lapses, especially the lifting of the requirement to track traffic stops by race.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 24, 2010
After tactical officers burst into Cheye Calvos's house, bound his hands, held his mother-in-law on the floor and fatally shot his Labrador retrievers, the angry Berwyn Heights mayor was convinced that sheriff's deputies and other police in Prince George's County were out of control. Even when police were serving routine warrants, regardless of whether intelligence indicated a threat, Calvo - who was absolved of any wrongdoing - argued that the police as a matter of policy deployed paramilitary teams armed with automatic weapons.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 8, 2014
A SWAT team attempted to serve a warrant at an apartment complex in Aberdeen Thursday morning, according to police officials. The SWAT team was in the 300 block of Stevens Circle at the Cranberry Run Apartments Wednesday morning, Aberdeen Police Department spokesperson Lt. Fred Budnick confirmed. Budnick said he could not provide details of the warrant, nor could he confirm if the warrant was served or if anyone was arrested as a part of the SWAT mission. Budnick did say the warrant is part of an ongoing investigation.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Law enforcement agencies across Maryland are no longer required to collect and report the race of drivers in traffic stops to the state because legislators didn't notice a 3-year-old law expiring. Police, sheriff's departments and other similar agencies also no longer have to provide the state with information about their SWAT deployments as another expiring law had stipulated. The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland decried the lapses, especially the lifting of the requirement to track traffic stops by race.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2003
Super-talented Samuel L. Jackson, the hardest-working actor since Michael Caine and Gene Hackman in their take-the-money-and-run days, has as much of a right as anyone to indulge his yen for lucrative employment. But his straight shooter in S.W.A.T. is packing blanks. You get everything you need to know about him from his John Wayne-esque nickname, "Hondo." He's a confident, no-bull team commander who will home in on a black-sheep officer like Jim Street (Colin Farrell) and give him a second chance at elite service in S.W.A.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 1, 1997
WHITE MARSH -- An open house, featuring video identification and fingerprinting programs for children, will be VTC held Saturday at the Police Department's White Marsh Precinct, 8220 Perry Hall Blvd.The program, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., will also help precinct members celebrate their 10th anniversary. The event will feature demonstrations by SWAT team members, the Aviation Unit, police dogs and their handlers, and other specialty groups.Information: 410-887-5035.Pub Date: 10/01/97
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier and Zulfiqar Ali,Tribune Newspapers | April 25, 2009
After a day of meetings and government threats, a group of Taliban fighters grabbed their guns Friday, jumped into their trucks and headed back toward the Swat Valley. But residents of the Buner district, the object of the Taliban expansionary push, remained badly shaken, well aware of the militants' record in neighboring Swat of burning schools, beheading policemen and beating unmarried couples walking in public or holding hands. "I can't think of going back to Buner," given the security situation, said Afsar Khan, 40, a municipal council member, who fled to Peshawar with his family.
NEWS
By Laura King | August 1, 2008
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Fighting raged yesterday in a scenic valley in Pakistan's troubled northwest, killing at least 17 civilians, including seven members of a family whose home was hit by a mortar shell, local officials said. The violence that broke out Tuesday has been the worst in months in the Swat Valley, which is about 100 miles from the capital, Islamabad. In recent days, militants seeking to impose a Taliban-style social code have been burning girls' schools, attacking police posts and abducting paramilitary troops.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | October 29, 2006
A 22-year-old Columbia man faces the possibility of 30 years in prison after being convicted of attempted second-degree murder for firing an assault rifle at Howard County SWAT officers during an investigation of his home this year. Sentencing for Delcarlos Johnnie Jacobs is scheduled for Nov. 30. After more than eight hours of deliberations Wednesday and Thursday, a jury found Jacobs guilty of attempted second-degree murder against one SWAT officer, and guilty of assault and reckless endangerment against 14 other members of the team.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Baltimore police used battering rams to smash their way into suspected drug dens in a series of pre-dawn raids Tuesday that netted a half-dozen arrests, continuing what authorities describe as aggressive campaign to "dismantle" the Black Guerrilla Family gang. It was the second such strike in less than a week. Officials sharpened their rhetoric against the one-time prison gang they say has been spreading across the city and taking over drug territories through force and intimidation.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Baltimore police responded to a report of an armed person inside Under Armour's headquarters in Locust Point Sunday but later determined that the 911 call was a hoax, officials said. About a dozen Under Armour workers were evacuated after the call came in at 2:18 p.m. Sunday, police said. Police barricaded streets surrounding the company's campus for hours while a SWAT team swept each building room by room. Investigators said they believe the caller was not an Under Armour employee and had no association with the company.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
Too often, we take for granted the people we hire to guard our communities and apprehend those accused of wrongdoing. Baltimore County Police Officer Jason Schneider, a 13-year veteran of the force whose unit carried out some of the department's most difficult and dangerous missions to capture armed fugitives, was one such unsung hero. His death Wednesday in a hail of gunfire inside a Catonsville house was a tragic reminder of the risks he and others like him face on a daily basis in order to ensure the safety of those they are sworn to protect - that is, all of us. Officer Schneider, a 36-year-old father of two, was by all accounts an exemplary public servant and a leader among his colleagues on the county SWAT team, where he had been involved in the planning and execution of virtually every tactical operation carried out by his unit over the last decade.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 17, 2013
That Aberdeen, Bel Air and Havre de Grace are considering pooling police agency resources to form a single SWAT team is an idea with some merit insofar as it would be less expensive than having each of the three municipalities form its own special unit for dealing with dangerous situations. Then again, the taxpayers of Harford County - including those in the three municipalities - already pay for a police tactical unit, the one that's under the command of the Sheriff's Office. Similarly, Maryland State Police have some pretty specialized units that can be called in to deal with unusual situations.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013
Mitch Ross, the supplement maker who allegedly provided deer antlerĀ velvet spray to Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis, said during a news conference Friday that he's received death threats from angry Ravens fans. Ross didn't provide any specific information about the alleged threats, though. "It's unfortunate that I'm getting death threats from Ravens fans," said a sleeveless Ross, who was wearing a black skull cap and displaying bottles of the spray and other products, including performance chips, which aren't banned by the NFL. "I got duped by Sports Illustrated.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Mitch Ross handled Ray Lewis' public berating the way the Ravens linebacker has said he handles difficult times. "That stuff with Ray?" Ross said Wednesday. "I've put that in God's hands. " Ross co-owns SWATS, the company that, according to Sports Illustrated, provided Lewis with deer antler spray and other supplements and apparel to aid in his recovery from a torn triceps. Lewis aggressively denied using the SWATS products again Wednesday from New Orleans, where the Ravens are preparing to play the 49ers in the Super Bowl on Sunday and painted Ross as an opportunist with "no credibility.
NEWS
By Pamela Constable and Pamela Constable,The Washington Post | April 24, 2009
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -Taliban forces consolidated control of two northwestern Pakistan districts and sent patrols into a third Thursday, stepping up their defiance of a government peace deal and raising fears of further advances by violent Islamists who have now come within 60 miles of this capital city. Officials reacted with only mild concern, saying the Taliban should comply with their pledge to lay down arms but the peace deal should be given a chance. The national security adviser, Rehman Malik, said security had actually "improved" in the past two weeks but force would be "the only option" if the militants do not halt violence.
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 15, 1997
Police were seeking a motive and suspect in the slaying yesterday of a 15-year-old boy, who was shot on a crowded East Baltimore street.The boy, whose name was withheld pending notification of family, was in the 1700 block of N. Broadway about 3: 15 p.m. when he was shot several times with a handgun, said Detective Don Gordon of the homicide unit.Gordon said the mortally wounded youth stumbled into a nearby house and collapsed on the living room floor. Gordon said the youth was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died at 4: 27 p.m.Woman is fatally shot near home; man soughtA woman was fatally shot yesterday afternoon about a block from her West Baltimore home, and police were seeking a man with whom she was talking shortly before the shooting.
NEWS
August 13, 2012
The death of a Reisterstown man who was not the subject of a police arrest warrant during a SWAT team raid this summer unfortunately is nothing new ("Reisterstown fatality raises concerns about police raids," Aug. 9). Since President Reagan initiated the so-called "war on drugs" in 1981, these tactics have become increasingly common. SWAT teams were originally intended for violent situations. Today, however, they are deployed quite regularly, often to serve narcotics warrants as part of this misguided and racially biased "war on drugs.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
The Army's next-generation carbine may come out of a Highlandtown machine shop best known for making high-volume bottling equipment for major drink makers. Adcor Industries Inc. learned this month that it was among a handful of weapons makers selected to compete to build a possible replacement for the M4, a rifle descended from the well-known M16 and that some soldiers have criticized as unreliable in the dry, dusty conditions in Iraq. Adcor, which employs about 80 people in its block-sized building on South Haven Street, will face some of the biggest names in global gun-making in a race to be the Army's small-arms weapon of choice in the 21st century.
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