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NEWS
By Christi Parsons, Michael A. Memoli and David S. Cloud, Tribune Newspapers | June 4, 2014
The release of America's only prisoner of war in Afghanistan in a trade for five senior Taliban commanders from U.S. custody took only minutes Saturday. But it followed 31/2 years of secret on-and-off negotiations that produced far less than the White House had hoped. The idea of swapping prisoners emerged in early 2011, administration and congressional officials said Tuesday, when U.S. officials still sought to convince Taliban political leaders to come to the negotiating table to end the grinding war in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
By Dane Egli | July 27, 2014
The violence erupting on the former battlefields of Operation Iraqi Freedom coupled with the planned withdrawal from Afghanistan raises new concerns over the recent exchange of five Taliban commanders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The swap conflicted with traditional hostage recovery policy and trading of war prisoners and may lead our enemies to conclude that we're now willing to negotiate with kidnappers - potentially endangering lives abroad. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was himself an insurgent detainee released by the U.S. in 2009.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
Joy Hindle cried when she found out she couldn't give one of her kidneys to her twin brother. Then doctors gave the Bel Air woman another option: a kidney exchange, in which she would donate her kidney to a patient who needed one, and her diabetic brother would get one from another willing donor. Hindle and brother Paul McSorley were two of six participants in a triple kidney transplant performed last month by doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She gave her kidney to a stranger; he got a kidney from a stranger.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
They came with .22-caliber rifles wrapped in trash bags, Saturday night special handguns, rusted shotguns handed down from grandparents. A crowd of dozens lined up by 10 a.m. Saturday at a Northwest Baltimore church parking lot, most with gray hair and some leaning on canes or using hearing aides. They left with one $100 ShopRite Supermarket gift card per gun turned in. Many were skeptical that the gun buyback event would achieve organizers' goal of reducing city crime, though they were pleased to get something of value for guns that in many cases hadn't been fired in years or decades.
NEWS
January 14, 1995
Speaker Newt Gingrich says he wants conservative suburban Republicans to "swap" House districts with liberal urban Democrats. To lead the way, he plans to swap with the man he says is his favorite black Democrat in the House of Representatives, Baltimore's Kweisi Mfume.We think it's a good idea -- as long as it's not just a gimmick. Representative Mfume seems to be a little skeptical. That's understandable. We are, too. We don't doubt the speaker's sincerity, but we have to say that he has been throwing off so many bold and innovative ideas recently that it is hard to know which ones are thoroughly thought through, do-able and will be assigned a high priority, and which ones are not and will soon be filed away and forgotten.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has offered Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke a deal he cannot afford to reject: a takeover of the poorly run and terribly overcrowded City Jail -- if the city gives up its state police aid. This swap would net Baltimore $2 million in savings this year and much larger amounts later. It is the kind of downsizing of city government that makes fiscal and operational sense.The governor also is asking the General Assembly to take over financial responsibility for the Baltimore Zoo. This three-year phase-in would save Mr. Schmoke another $2.1 million while keeping the non-profit Zoological Society in charge of the institution.
NEWS
By 3. From Staff Reports | September 9, 1995
In a land swap, lawyer and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos is donating a 700-foot strip of Towson land to the state for the widening of the Baltimore Beltway's inner-loop York Road exit.In exchange, the state plans to deed to Mr. Angelos a smaller piece of land that would allow him to build an extra entrance from nearby West Road to the five-acre site he owns at the Beltway intersection. He already has access from York Road.No money was exchanged in the deal, Mr. Angelos and a state official said.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | March 23, 2008
We're considering the idea of swapping houses while in London. How can we find a suitable family? There are many home-exchange sites on the Internet offering domestic and international house swaps ranging from a few days to a month or more. Britain is a popular destination. Among the better-known sites are Homeexchange.com and Homelink. org. Homeexchange charges $99.95 for a one-year membership; at Homelink, you'll pay $110. The site Digsville.com charges $44.95 but has fewer listings.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- U.S. Army Specialist Robert Mora of Cleveland looked at the rusting, decaying guns laid out on the back of the flatbed truck and shook his head in disgust.There were 19 pistols, seven rifles and three submachine guns. Eight canisters of tear gas were stuffed in a bag."You could probably sell 12 or 15 of these guns in America -- to antique dealers," Specialist Mora said.And so it went yesterday on the first day of the guns-for-cash swap between the U.S. military and the Haitian population.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997
Legg Mason Inc. signed a definitive agreement to acquire money manager Brandywine Asset Management Inc. in a stock swap valued at about $135 million, the Baltimore-based company said yesterday.Legg will issue 2.6 million shares of common stock, or about 10 percent of its current outstanding shares, plus 200,000 stock options.Raymond A. "Chip" Mason, Legg's chairman and chief executive, said the Wilmington, Del.-based Brandywine fits well with its "value" style of investing. It also adds billions of dollars in assets to the company's managed portfolio.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun and By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
BOSTON  -  Without the advantage of being in their own facility on Saturday at Fenway Park, the Orioles needed to ensure that right-hander Bud Norris could test his strained right groin as scheduled. So with the Orioles playing a split doubleheader, the club found a way to borrow the Fenway Park field so Norris could throw a simulated game. They traded their pregame afternoon batting practice session for field access between games, Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. Norris pitched two simulated innings after the first game of the doubleheader, which began at 1:05 p.m. and ended just before 4 p.m. He pitched to Orioles coaches Wayne Kirby and Einar Diaz as well as vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson . Between innings, Norris walked off the field and into the dugout to simulate a game inning.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
At last, some outrage from Congress over this imperial president's unilateral actions ( "Ruppersberger: Bergdahl decision sets 'dangerous precedent,'" June 2). Imagine releasing five of the worst criminals from Guantanamo. These are terrorists whose whole purpose is to kill Americans! Now, we find out that U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl might have actually been a deserter. This man does not deserve to be president of the United States. We have "1984," "Animal Farm" and "The Manchurian Candidate" rolled into one in this administration.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons, Michael A. Memoli and David S. Cloud, Tribune Newspapers | June 4, 2014
The release of America's only prisoner of war in Afghanistan in a trade for five senior Taliban commanders from U.S. custody took only minutes Saturday. But it followed 31/2 years of secret on-and-off negotiations that produced far less than the White House had hoped. The idea of swapping prisoners emerged in early 2011, administration and congressional officials said Tuesday, when U.S. officials still sought to convince Taliban political leaders to come to the negotiating table to end the grinding war in Afghanistan.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 16, 2014
The Washington Mystics acquired forward Tianna Hawkins (Maryland) and guard Bria Hartley from the Seattle Storm in exchange for forward Crystal Langhorne (Maryland) on Monday, the day of the WNBA draft. Hawkins was taken sixth overall in the first round by the Storm last year. The 6-foot-3 forward played in 33 games, averaging 3.4 points and 1.6 rebounds. At Maryland, Hawkins led the Terps to the Sweet Sixteen and was named first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference in 2013.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The 16-3 score by which Maryland trounced Mount St. Mary's on Saturday indicated the relative ease of the Terps' effort in the season opener for both teams. In addition to the 10 starters, Maryland rotated 31 players into the game. To coach John Tillman, that was a significant development for a roster that includes 14 freshmen. “It's nice to get a win,” he said Tuesday morning. “For some of our inexperienced guys, [we got them] some playing time. Maybe get some of their anxiousness out of their system playing in their first college game as Terps.” After the game, Tillman said liberal substitution of the players was more of a designed approach to gauging what untested players can do in game conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Holy Frijoles in Hampden and Frederick's on Fleet in Canton are the subjects of a cable TV show being taped in Baltimore this week. The show, being developed for the TruTv network, appears to be a variation of "Wife Swap," the reality show in which two unalike families "swap" mothers. In this show, it's the owners of unalike establishments who take up temporary residence at each other's bar. That meant Holy Frijoles owner Geoffrey Danek took his laid-back management style to Frederick's on Fleet for three nights of filming, while Frederick's part-owner Jim Saufley, a part-time boxing coach, brought his stricter style to Hampden.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 15, 1994
Baltimore's impending network affiliate swap claims its first sports casualty this weekend. Channel 11 has opted not to carry CBS' coverage of the inaugural Presidents Cup golf tournament from Lake Manassas, Va.The tournament, which is similar to the Ryder Cup, will feature 12 of the best players from the United States against 12 players from around the world in match-play competition, and should make for fascinating viewing.But you'll need a TV set that can pick up Washington's Channel 9 to get Saturday (3 p.m.)
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a way, it's too bad that the Republican and Democratic parties don't settle things the way it's done in the international spy business. That is, when each side catches the other spying, they simply swap the spies they've caught and forget about it.This thought comes to mind in the current dust-up over House Speaker Newt Gingrich's $4.5 million book deal, changed in the face of Democratic sniping to a straight royalties arrangement, which could yield him just as much in the end.The Democrats, led by House Minority Whip David Bonior, are continuing to flail Gingrich in the wake of disclosures that he met with publisher Rupert Murdoch and his lobbyist at a time when Murdoch's lucrative television interests are being challenged before the Federal Communications Commission.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
When John Davis' kidney began failing in January, his girlfriend's mother decided to donate one of her kidneys to help save his life. That the two weren't actually a "match" - meaning Davis' body would never accept her kidney - didn't matter. In a groundbreaking program at Johns Hopkins Hospital that is as much about nationwide networking as it is medical innovation, kidney transplants are being arranged not through isolated pairings of patient and donor, but through longer and longer chains of individuals who don't even know each other.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
So many Americans experience dangerous fluctuations in heartbeat that about 400,000 times a year a device is implanted in their chests to keep a normal rhythm. But the defibrillators that send a life-saving electric buzz through the heart can be so painful and damaging that scientists have been looking for a better way. At the Johns Hopkins University, researchers believe that a mellow ray of light could someday replace the electricity. "We're using explosives to open a door for which we have no key," said Natalia Trayanova, a professor in Hopkins' department of biomedical engineering.
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