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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
Environmentalists have long eyed the peaceful, forested green space at the heart of Anne Arundel's most heavily industrialized area, worrying that it could be lost to development. Now the tract of more than 100 acres on the banks of the Patapsco River is a permanently protected part of the landscape on the Marley Neck peninsula. In its first major acquisition, the North County Land Trust has secured a conservation easement on the Swan Creek site owned by the Maryland Port Administration, ensuring the preservation of the land, which contains wetlands and habitat for wildlife and waterfowl.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, 6201 Swan Creek Road in Rock Hall reaches new heights in property ownership. A classic 19th-century farmhouse and a charming waterfront cottage sit on a private peninsula consisting of 177-plus acres of farmland. With gorgeous views of the Chesapeake Bay, the main farmhouse has been meticulously restored by the owner from the foundation up - including a major addition completed in 1998 that nearly doubles the living space. This has allowed for a modern kitchen, family room, guest room and an office.
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EXPLORE
July 27, 2011
First Nutrition recently opened two locations in Harford County, one in Bel Air Plaza and the other in Swan Creek, Havre de Grace. Karl and Sharon Graybeal are coaches at the Bel Air operation and Gary and Diane in Havre de Grace. The nutrition clubs are open for breakfast and lunch each day and close around 6 p.m. Both of locations are independent distributors of Herbalife Products, specializing in weight management programs. A new line of "24" brand athletic products is also now available at each site.
EXPLORE
July 27, 2011
First Nutrition recently opened two locations in Harford County, one in Bel Air Plaza and the other in Swan Creek, Havre de Grace. Karl and Sharon Graybeal are coaches at the Bel Air operation and Gary and Diane in Havre de Grace. The nutrition clubs are open for breakfast and lunch each day and close around 6 p.m. Both of locations are independent distributors of Herbalife Products, specializing in weight management programs. A new line of "24" brand athletic products is also now available at each site.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1995
Harford County officials say an aggressive response that included military helicopters and chemical foam extinguished Thursday's five-alarm blaze at an Aberdeen tire landfill where a similar fire burned for three days in 1983.More than 125 firefighters from Harford, Cecil and Baltimore counties spent 19 hours at the scene of what is being called a suspicious fire. The fire was under control shortly before midnight Thursday, although workers continued to battle flare-ups through the night at the 200-by-200 foot mound estimated to contain 150,000 tires.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
The Harford County Council this week unanimously agreed to hire Raymond A. Dearchs as its new auditor, choosing the assistant Anne Arundel County auditor over two other finalists.Mr. Dearches, 39, a certified public accountant, replaces Michael V. Treherne, who resigned in December.The auditor works on an annual contract and is paid by the hour, up to $24,000 a year, for projects assigned by the council. He helps the council with fiscal issues and reviewing the budget."What is exciting about this candidate is he has government experience with other charter governments," said Council President Joanne S. Parrott.
NEWS
September 25, 1991
The report this past summer that the Maryland Darter, the only animal, bird or fish found only in this state, has disappeared from its last known home in Susquehanna State Park was deeply distressing. Frostburg State University biologist Richard Raesly, who searched for the diminutive member of the perch family in Deer Creek, still hopes it will turn up again. After all, as he says, rare species have been thought extinct before.Still, other fish in the 171-mile Deer Creek watershed near Havre de Grace have been disappearing as well.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
Military veterans applying for work with Harford County will have 5 percent or 10 percent added to their test scores under a preference law passed by the County Council.The measure, which was suggested by the county's Commission on Veterans Affairs, was approved last week by a 6-0 vote, with District A Councilwoman Susan B. Heselton absent.George Mitchell, a veteran of the Korea and Vietnam wars who heads the county's veterans commission, said the new law will bring Harford into line with the state and federal governments' hiring practices.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
On Jan. 24, 1781, Quartermaster Richard Dallam of Abingdon wrote to Gov. Thomas Sim Lee concerning the passage of troops through Harford County during the War for Independence. "A detachment of 32 wagons with Captain Brown's artillery passed a few days ago and experienced much the want of provisions, and the inhabitants have also suffered thereby." Hungry troops forced local citizens to supply them in exchange for worthless certificates of reimbursement. Although Harford County was not invaded during the conflict, the constant military traffic was a source of anxiety.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
Last call for the Maryland darter. The elusive little fish, one of the rarest in the world, hasn't been seen in 21 years. Now, government and university biologists are teaming up for one more, perhaps final search for it in Harford County, where it's never been spotted more than sporadically since it was first noticed almost a century ago in a fast-flowing creek near Havre de Grace. Named for the only state in which it's ever been found, this bottom-feeding member of the perch family has been seen in just three creeks off the lower Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
Last call for the Maryland darter. The elusive little fish, one of the rarest in the world, hasn't been seen in 21 years. Now, government and university biologists are teaming up for one more, perhaps final search for it in Harford County, where it's never been spotted more than sporadically since it was first noticed almost a century ago in a fast-flowing creek near Havre de Grace. Named for the only state in which it's ever been found, this bottom-feeding member of the perch family has been seen in just three creeks off the lower Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,david.kohn@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
No pool. No spa. No concierge. No room service. Not even a restaurant, unless you count the Burger King a few blocks away. But the Swan Creek Inn and River Lodge at Aberdeen Proving Ground is the haute place to stay, anywhere on the planet, at least according to the Army. Last summer, the hotel won the Army's highest hotel honor, Lodging Operation of the Year, beating military inns and lodges from Japan to Texas. Swan Creek has won in its category - large hotels - three times in the past decade, an impressive feat, given that military lodges are ineligible for the contest for two years after winning.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
On Jan. 24, 1781, Quartermaster Richard Dallam of Abingdon wrote to Gov. Thomas Sim Lee concerning the passage of troops through Harford County during the War for Independence. "A detachment of 32 wagons with Captain Brown's artillery passed a few days ago and experienced much the want of provisions, and the inhabitants have also suffered thereby." Hungry troops forced local citizens to supply them in exchange for worthless certificates of reimbursement. Although Harford County was not invaded during the conflict, the constant military traffic was a source of anxiety.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
Environmentalists have long eyed the peaceful, forested green space at the heart of Anne Arundel's most heavily industrialized area, worrying that it could be lost to development. Now the tract of more than 100 acres on the banks of the Patapsco River is a permanently protected part of the landscape on the Marley Neck peninsula. In its first major acquisition, the North County Land Trust has secured a conservation easement on the Swan Creek site owned by the Maryland Port Administration, ensuring the preservation of the land, which contains wetlands and habitat for wildlife and waterfowl.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | May 25, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- What to do?Here are a couple of dozen eighth-graders, several parents and teachers, and 11 canoes, all waiting on the shore of the Chesapeake Bay for a long-planned outing. But the northwest wind is wailing like a far-off siren, the tree branches overhead are whipping around, and away out on the wide expanse of water between us and the beached-whale hump of Elk Neck to the east are what look a lot like whitecaps.The timorous among us, including at the moment your correspondent, wonder if this is really a good idea -- even considering the bright sun, the adequate safety gear and the number of experienced paddlers in the party.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1995
Harford County officials say an aggressive response that included military helicopters and chemical foam extinguished Thursday's five-alarm blaze at an Aberdeen tire landfill where a similar fire burned for three days in 1983.More than 125 firefighters from Harford, Cecil and Baltimore counties spent 19 hours at the scene of what is being called a suspicious fire. The fire was under control shortly before midnight Thursday, although workers continued to battle flare-ups through the night at the 200-by-200 foot mound estimated to contain 150,000 tires.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
After more than an hour of hearing residents complain of foul odors and unreasonable sewerage charges, the County Council rejected a bill that would have assessed some residents more than $240 a year for septic systems installed in six Harford County neighborhoods.The council, which could have taken a month to decide on the bill after Tuesday's public hearing, voted 7-0 against the assessments shortly after the hearing ended."It's a health hazard," said Agnes Ellis, a Dembytown Road resident, of the septic system installed in her neighborhood.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | May 25, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- What to do?Here are a couple of dozen eighth-graders, several parents and teachers, and 11 canoes, all waiting on the shore of the Chesapeake Bay for a long-planned outing. But the northwest wind is wailing like a far-off siren, the tree branches overhead are whipping around, and away out on the wide expanse of water between us and the beached-whale hump of Elk Neck to the east are what look a lot like whitecaps.The timorous among us, including at the moment your correspondent, wonder if this is really a good idea -- even considering the bright sun, the adequate safety gear and the number of experienced paddlers in the party.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
The Harford County Council this week unanimously agreed to hire Raymond A. Dearchs as its new auditor, choosing the assistant Anne Arundel County auditor over two other finalists.Mr. Dearches, 39, a certified public accountant, replaces Michael V. Treherne, who resigned in December.The auditor works on an annual contract and is paid by the hour, up to $24,000 a year, for projects assigned by the council. He helps the council with fiscal issues and reviewing the budget."What is exciting about this candidate is he has government experience with other charter governments," said Council President Joanne S. Parrott.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
Military veterans applying for work with Harford County will have 5 percent or 10 percent added to their test scores under a preference law passed by the County Council.The measure, which was suggested by the county's Commission on Veterans Affairs, was approved last week by a 6-0 vote, with District A Councilwoman Susan B. Heselton absent.George Mitchell, a veteran of the Korea and Vietnam wars who heads the county's veterans commission, said the new law will bring Harford into line with the state and federal governments' hiring practices.
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