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NEWS
September 30, 2010
Did politicians exempt themselves from the litter laws the same way they exempted themselves from the "do not call" list? The primary election was weeks ago, yet countless signs for those who lost remain, many illegally placed on public land. It's time for these signs to come down. At what point do they officially become litter? The offending campaigns should be fined. Steve Raskin, Parkton
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
If you wanted any real sense of what was going on in the first hour after primary election polls closed Tuesday night, you had to go online or, better yet, plug into Twitter, because TV didn't seem to be trying hard at all. I am not talking about anything as bold and daring as the network affiliates actually interrupting or, God forbid, pre-empting reruns. I am talking about such basic business as putting tickers or crawls on the bottom of the screen with early vote totals as they came in. I was seeing few of them as I kept switching among WBAL (Channel 11)
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
A woman, dressed as a great blue heron, promised children tales from the swamp."I am going to talk to you about something we don't have at the aquarium -- a swamp," said Cathie Vincent, an educator with the National Aquarium on a visit to William Winchester Elementary in Westminster yesterday."
ENTERTAINMENT
Casi Dow and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
I may have been a little too excited for the premiere of "Top Chef New Orleans. " I had a dream the night before that I was on the show and immediately thrown into a Quickfire Challenge. This was an issue because: 1) I am not a chef, barely a home cook - as evidenced by my dinner of toast and cereal last night; and 2) the challenge was to create a meal out of jellybeans. And I don't mean cooking with jellybeans. I mean that's all we had. A pile of jellybeans. We were asked to put what flavors we thought would work well together on a plate and serve them to Tom Colicchio.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | February 5, 1995
EASTON, Pa. -- Wes Cooper scored 16 points and nine rebounds, leading visiting Navy to an 84-70 victory over Lafayette in a Patriot League game yesterday.The victory for Navy (13-8, 5-4) ended a three-game losing streak at Lafayette (2-19, 0-9), which has lost 16 consecutive games.In their last meeting on Jan. 11, the Midshipmen defeated the Leopards by 16 points. Yesterday, Navy was in command, leading 43-26 at halftime.The Midshipmen shot 16 for 33 from the field in the first half while Lafayette was only 9-of-24.
NEWS
August 9, 2000
Send your answer to us at Weekly Question, The Sun, Features Department, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278. Please include your name, age and the school you attend.
NEWS
By DAN MORSE and DAN MORSE,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1997
A dense Eastern Shore swamp was no match this week for a 90-pound Boy Scout armed with a Charms Blow-Pop.Chris Belknap, a 13-year-old camper who got lost trying to take a shortcut, survived 32 hours in swamp waters up to his waist before he was rescued on a riverbank Thursday evening.He had no water to drink and ate only the Blow-Pop, a watermelon-flavored Jolly Rancher sucker and another piece of candy."I'm basically OK," Chris said from his Denton home yesterday, suffering from more than 40 mosquito bites.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 2002
MILLVILLE, N.J. - The 17 tree lovers shuffled, bent over, fighting their way through the low-hanging vines and branches, resplendent in their vapor trail of insect repellent, swamp and sweat. They were on the hunt, looking for the biggest, oldest trees in the Northeast, and on this day at least, New Jersey - known more for its turnpike than its timber - seemed a likely place to look. "Holy mackerel!" a voice bellowed from up ahead. "Look at the size of this black gum!" Every old tree, no matter where it has taken root, is a mystery story, a testament to time and perseverance wrapped in the riddles of growth rings and scarred bark.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,Special to the Sun | February 11, 2001
Barbara Hurd steps off the dirt road, into a thicket of grasses so tangled they almost hide the still, murky water below. She puts a rubber boot forward, letting it sink down until it rests on something firmer, though invisible. "You just have to feel where the bottom is, because it's deceptive," she says. The sky is overcast as Hurd makes her way through Finzel Swamp in the Appalachian highlands of western Maryland. Scorched-looking spines of trees, their roots long since drowned in the flooded earth, rise starkly above the grass and bushes like gnarled tentacles.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 1996
MIAMI -- Helicopters hovered over the scorched swampland and recovery workers dodged alligators to dive into the muck. But the Everglades, desolate and mysterious, gave up only a few clues yesterday about the jet that disappeared into the mire Saturday afternoon, killing 109 people and leaving almost no trace.Local and federal officials gave up any hope of rescuing survivors from ValuJet Flight 592 and changed the name of the mission to "recovery." Then they set about trying to figure out how to find the plane -- or pieces of it -- in the swamp and pull its victims free.
SPORTS
By Everett Cook | August 3, 2012
In the Orioles Banquet Room overlooking Camden Yards on Thursday night, $566,132 was exchanged for 37 baseball cards that a family almost threw out with the garbage in March. The cards were part of the so-called “Black Swamp Find,” named after the area in Defiance, Ohio where the cards were found by the Hench family. The family was cleaning out the house of an aunt who had recently passed away when they got to the attic, full of relics from the turn of century. The hidden treasure of 1910 E-98 cards was found in a non-descript box underneath a dollhouse, but weren't recognized as valuable because of how small they were in comparison to modern day cards.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
It was like something out of a Hollywood movie - a musty attic in a stately old home, a forlorn-looking dollhouse perched against one wall and underneath it, a mysterious dust-covered box wrapped in twine. But what Karl Kissner and his cousin, Karla Hench, stumbled upon on that gray February day was a real-life bonanza of about 700 baseball cards from the early 1900s with a total estimated value of about $3 million, according to some experts. "Some people discover art in their attic, others discover natural gas on their property," said Chris Ivy of Heritage Auctions in Dallas, which bills itself as the world's largest collectible auctioneer.
EXPLORE
October 3, 2011
Rec sports The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. on Mondays. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). We do not accept results by phone. When two Howard County teams play, players from both teams (first and last names) must be mentioned in the write-up. Questions? Call 410-332-6578. Running Storm in the Swamp The Long Reach and Reservoir field hockey teams combined to put together the Storm in the Swamp 5k run and Mommy Trot Sept.
EXPLORE
By Larry Perl and Lauren Rosenberg | September 14, 2011
City Councilman Carl Stokes said he surprised himself with his wide margin of victory over Odette Ramos in Tuesday's Democratic primary race to represent Charles Village. "It's much more than I expected, frankly," Stokes, an appointed councilman who was running for the 12th District seat, said on election night as he partied with Council President Bernard C. 'Jack' Young, who soundly defeated former Senator Theatre ownerTom Kiefaber. With all Baltimore voting precincts reporting in the Democratic primary race, Stokes led Ramos by 49 to 23 percent, with Devon Brown at 12 percent, Jason Curtis at 8 percent and three others at 3 percent or less, in one of the city's most hotly contested races.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
It's cool one August morning in a forest near the marsh, quiet but for the occasional bellowing of a few green frogs, and two experts on Maryland's flora and fauna are preparing for a sticky mission. Earl "Bud" Reaves dons a wide-brimmed hat and pulls on a pair of hip waders. "A bad day in the woods is better than a good day somewhere else," says Reaves, a forester for Anne Arundel County. Chris Swarth, clad in a tie-dyed shirt, pulls a bright red flag from his jeans. "We're going to find that tree, and we're going to mark it," says Swarth, the ecologist who directs the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in southernmost Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
Did politicians exempt themselves from the litter laws the same way they exempted themselves from the "do not call" list? The primary election was weeks ago, yet countless signs for those who lost remain, many illegally placed on public land. It's time for these signs to come down. At what point do they officially become litter? The offending campaigns should be fined. Steve Raskin, Parkton
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
Isle of Wight Courthouse, Va. -- Some 25 miles west of Norfolk, in the center of what Virginians know as Isle of Wight County, and the rest of us would quickly recognize as the middle of nowhere, a rugged 4 x 4 bounces down sandy, barely discernible trails leading toward Rattlesnake Swamp.Inside, four improbable companions peek through the dust at the forsaken, broken scape of woodland, choked by layers of sweet honeysuckle and shrouded in bleak stillness.Three are armed, sober-minded men who look every bit like agents of the United States Secret Service.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
Researchers digging along a rural Pennsylvania highway have unearthed what they say is the world's oldest known arm bone, once used by a slithery creature to raise itself up out of a prehistoric swamp. "We're looking at our very distant ancestor," said Neil Shubin, a professor of organismal biology at the University of Chicago who worked on the discovery. The bone formed the upper arm of an animal about 3 feet long that looked like a flat-headed salamander and lurked in swamps and shallow waters 365 million years ago. Lodged in a geological formation exposed by highway construction a decade ago, the bone will help scientists determine what kinds of aquatic creatures first ventured out of the primordial ooze to form the roots of our family tree.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang and The Washington Post | March 1, 2010
The Maryland women's basketball team finished its regular season with a 94-61 loss to ninth-ranked Florida State on Sunday in a game that juxtaposed the value of veteran leadership against the inconsistency often associated with youth. With three seniors in their starting lineup, the visiting Seminoles withstood Maryland's 6-0 burst to open the game, tied it soon after and used deft 3-point shooting to pull away before halftime. "I think from our end, it was a game that was not very typical of how we play," Maryland coach Brenda Frese said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | edward.lee@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
The Navy men's lacrosse team might have avoided the storm projected to hit the Annapolis area Thursday night, but the same could not be said for what North Carolina delivered. The No. 3 Tar Heels scored the game's first six goals as they overwhelmed the No. 11 Midshipmen, 11-4, at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. North Carolina senior attackman Gavin Petracca led all scorers with seven points on two goals and five assists, and senior midfielder Sean DeLaney added three goals and two assists for the Tar Heels, who improved to 4-0 for the third consecutive season.
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