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NEWS
July 15, 2010
A steadfast component of conservative gasbaggery has been the primacy of the common man of action, versus the "elites," the "pointy-headed intellectuals" and the "academics" in their "ivory towers." The gist of conservative posing is that frivolous girly-men spend years in college, slipping ever further away from the real world, losing sight of the "common sense" that holds all solutions to our modern problems. It is that Bushian swagger that Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal doubtless practiced before the full-length mirror before taking the stage during the poisoning of the Gulf to proclaim his intention to ignore the red tape, bureaucrats, and professorial pansies.
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | July 29, 2014
The Ravens finished the 2013 season with the 12th-ranked defense in the NFL, but they didn't have the usual swagger. They didn't intimidate anybody. They couldn't stop the run. They gave up big plays. They couldn't get off the field in crunch time of the fourth quarter. Swagger? The only Raven who had any was place-kicker Justin Tucker. So, that's what this training camp is all about as far as defense. The Ravens want to go old-school. "When we're in the heat of the moment, then maybe we may start to do some of those things - reacting too much to personnel groups or personnel - and let's just get back to the basics," Ravens rush linebacker Terrell Suggs said.
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SPORTS
By Mike Preston | December 29, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - The Ravens believe they still can repeat as Super Bowl champions, but they need to gain some momentum heading into the playoffs. In other words, they need to enter the postseason with a swagger instead of a limp. There isn't a better opportunity to regain some confidence and send a message to the rest of the league than tonight when the Ravens play the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Raymond James Stadium. A sellout crowd of more than 65,000 is expected. Playoff berths are at stake for both teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Range, Bryan Voltaggio's fourth restaurant, is a triumph of style in harmony with substance. Dinner at Range, which will last for hours but feel like minutes, is wall-to-wall pleasure, from the first hand-crafted cocktail to the last bonbon from the in-house chocolatier. There's a lot going on, and Range is as big as its name. The restaurant, open seven days a week for lunch and dinner, occupies the top level of the newly renovated retail atrium inside the Chevy Chase Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2008
Night of Thunder by Stephen Hunter Simon & Schuster / 304 pages / $26 With his white hair and unsteady gait, 63-year-old Bob Lee Swagger seems like a bumbling old man, certainly no match for the armed robbers and murderers he finds in NASCAR country. But in Stephen Hunter's latest thriller, Night of Thunder (in stores Sept. 23), nothing is what it seems. Known for his cinematic language, action-packed suspense and multifaceted characters, Hunter delivers all three in his latest. Formerly of The Baltimore Sun, Hunter, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post film critic and best-selling author, writes page-turners pumped with muscular verbs as in "It was Iron Mountain, and 421 slashed crookedly up its angry hump."
NEWS
By New York News Service | April 22, 1992
The aloof swagger and studied unflappability projected by young black men from inner-city urban areas is a "cool pose," a bit of posturing that insulates them from an otherwise overwhelming social reality, a new report holds.While the cool pose is often misread by teachers, principals and police officers as an attitude of defiance, psychologists who have studied it say it is a way for black youths to maintain a sense of integrity and suppress rage at being blocked from usual routes to esteem and success.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
Dennis Mannion expects the Ravens to sell a lot of black jerseys Sunday night at M&T Bank Stadium - between 300 and 500 of them, to be exact. That's three or four times as many replica uniform tops that fans buy on a typical game day. Yet the all-black uniforms, which the Ravens will wear for the first time Sunday night against Cleveland, weren't chosen for their potential as a big moneymaker for the team, he said. "It will definitely boost [sales]," said Mannion, Ravens senior vice president of business ventures.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
The trash-talking will end and the territorial battle will ensue. In a feud that has inspired more insults than Chris Berman has nicknames, the Ravens will clash with the Pittsburgh Steelers tonight before ESPN's national television audience. This vicious tug-of-war at PSINet Stadium is being waged with the AFC Central title at stake and the balance of power in the conference on the line. A win by the Steelers (10-2) would clinch the division title and likely the top seed in the conference, so soft is their schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
"Hot Springs," by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 478 pages. $25. Don't tell the Million Moms, but Stephen Hunter's gun-crazy Swagger boys are back, setting a very bad example on the gun issue. Tommy guns, .45 automatics, Winchester 97 shotguns, M-1 carbines and even Browning automatics are all cheerfully blazing away in Hunter's latest thriller, in a running series of bloody shoot-em-ups. "Hot Springs" is set in 1946. Marine Medal of Honor winner Earl Swagger, son of brutal, race-baiting Sheriff Charles Swagger, has been picked to lead an elite secret team to clean up that legendary Arkansas fleshpot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2003
Havana, by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 416 pages. $24.95 Preparing to eat a cockroach he won playing cards, a cadaverous prisoner in Stalin's frozen Siberian Gulag muses that the roach would be delicious sauteed en beurre with a complex red wine, perhaps a St. Emilion `34 or `35. "Why red?" he asks himself, and then answers: "Because red goes with meat. A cockroach certainly [isn't] fish, of that you may be sure." With that savory bit of whimsy, Stephen Hunter introduces Comrade Speshnev, a brilliant and impishly unpredictable Communist revolutionary who is sprung from the Gulag in 1953 and dispatched to Cuba.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | February 20, 2013
On Tuesday, WWE, through  Brian Flinn , WWE's senior VP of marketing and communications, issued an email statement to the Hollywood Reporter concerning WWE superstar Jack Swagger and manager Zeb Colter. Several blogs, critics and media outlets have complained that the characters Swagger and Colter are portraying on WWE TV are "right wing racists. " One paragraph of WWE's statement reads as follows: “WWE is creating drama centered on a topical subject that has varying points of view to develop a rivalry between two characters.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | February 18, 2013
I'll be the first to admit that I was definitely lukewarm about the main event match between CM Punk and The Rock at the Elimination Chamber pay-per-view. It wasn't a terrible match by any means. It wasn't terrific, either. Both men have had far more entertaining matches in WWE, but it must be said that both men did well given their limitations. What I mean by that is that The Rock, WWE champion, is a part-time worker of matches, so naturally, his "work rate" (as is the commonly used buzz word among the internet wrestling community)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In his new thriller, "The Third Bullet," novelist Stephen Hunter sets his sights on an American tragedy that's also the most famous gun mystery of all time - the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The questions surrounding the shooting as JFK rode in a motorcade in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have never been fully put to rest. And the controversy is certain to intensify as the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches this fall. As the novelist tells it, the decision to enlist his fictitious super-sniper, Bob Lee Swagger, to determine whether the gunman acted alone or as part of a conspiracy began as a joke.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
There has been a lot of discussion about President Obama's highlighting or even bragging about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden and its results ("Bin Laden volatile campaign subject," May 1). Much of this discussion has been criticism by Republicans, proving once again that the one area where Republicans are remarkably consistent is in their hypocrisy. They don't seem to remember cheering for a certain former president strutting about in a flight suit on the deck of an aircraft carrier celebrating "Mission Accomplished!"
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 26, 2011
The Ravens have every right to spend this idle weekend savoring Thursday night's solid performance against the San Francisco 49ers, but they aren't going to get where they want to go if they can't get one yard when it counts. Yes, I'm about to do a little nit-picking here while everybody else ponders the downhill portion of their regular-season schedule and wonders if they can stay focused long enough to win out and secure home-field advantage in the playoffs. That's a fair question, of course, considering that the AFC North title might be a foregone conclusion and the Ravens might have the stand-alone best record in the conference right now if they had taken care of business in their first-half encounters with the kind of teams that lie ahead.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | November 3, 2011
Ravens outside linebacker Terrell Suggs has the right idea. He stirred the emotions in the NFL's best rivalry this week when he reclaimed ownership of Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, talked about his warm and fuzzy relationship with Steelers fans and called out "Smiley," Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward. God bless Terrell Suggs. There was some concern here about the Ravens. After turning in two lackluster performances against Jacksonville and Arizona, I thought they might have lost some life and swagger.
NEWS
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1996
"Black Light," by Stephen Hunter. Doubleday. 463 pages. $23.95.When Crime King Elmore Leonard claims on the jacket that "Hunter does guys with guns better than anyone," it's about like Ken Griffey Jr. saying you have a nice swing - it raises expectations. In "Black Light," Hunter exceeds them all, catapulting the reader through a riveting -and deadly - adventure. Even more impressively, Hunter's book, featuring mostly male psychopaths and misfits, with enough rifles, handguns, shotguns, ammo and night-vision scopes to wear out a militiaman, is an odds-on mainstream blockbuster.
FEATURES
By Mike Leary and Mike Leary,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1998
"Time to Hunt," Stephen Hunter. Doubleday. 467 pages. $23.95.For years, Bob Lee Swagger drank to forget his days in "The Land of Bad Things," as he calls Vietnam, the land where he earned a fearsome name for his skill as a sniper, "Bob the Nailer." In "Time to Hunt," Swagger drinks to remember, to remember especially his jungle confrontation with a dreaded rival, "the white sniper," who killed his friend, and put a bullet in Swagger's hip, where it lies lodged, a bad memory.A generation later, in the Idaho fastness where Swagger has fled to forget, the white sniper comes hunting for him and his family.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
To properly understand the forces that shaped Dylan Bundy, and the journey that molded him into the best high school baseball player in the country, it's best to begin by talking about the red Oklahoma soil and the father's hands that toiled in them out of love. A decade before the Orioles selected Bundy with the fourth pick in the 2011 amateur draft, he was a stocky 8-year-old kid growing up in the tiny, no-stoplight town of Sperry, Okla. His family lived on 20 acres of dry, flat land, land that could have been farmed but was not. Instead, Dylan Bundy's father, Denver, who worked for Ford Motor Company in nearby Tulsa, looked at his vast backyard one day, and where some men might have envisioned rows of corn or cotton, he pictured a pitching mound.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
A couple of weeks ago, I was in Detroit to do a story on Tom Zbikowski, the Baltimore Raven spending the NFL lockout pursuing a pro boxing career, and we were driving from the suburbs to Kronk, a renowned gym that has produced multiple world-title fighters. "You gotta go to the 'hood,'" Zbikowski said as he turned onto an all-too-typical Detroit street of abandoned buildings and ghostly sidewalks. As a serious boxer for much of his 25 years, he's accustomed to training in this kind of neighborhood, but I still was struck by how he saw beyond the surface woes.
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